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Bearing prep for compression test?

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  • Mrs K Corbin
    replied
    what doofus said, but still recommend pulling at this point, especially after finding water.

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  • doofus
    replied
    Your going at it wrong trying to turn the crank by the crank bolt. pull the starter, use a crow bar and work on the flywheel teeth. also if you suspect stuck valves remove the rocker arm assy. work it back and forth (Flywheel) after lots of diesel is poured into the cylinders. be patient, let the diesel work. Luck Doofus

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  • sweetolbob
    replied
    Personally, setting 40 years and finding some water in it, I'd put it on the engine stand, pull the pan and see what I had. It could be just fine or there could be rust on all the cylinder walls and journals.

    That first turn could be more destructive than any other event. If it had set a couple of years and no moisture I'd probably still pull the pan but I'd be more comfortable just changing the oil, turning the pump and rolling it over.

    That's just me but I hate to see carnage that I could have prevented by a couple hours extra work.

    Bob

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  • Mrs K Corbin
    replied
    Time to Yank it.

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  • ChampCouple
    replied
    We pulled the plugs, shot lube in the cylinders, and made a little rod to drive the oil pump. The oil pump worked with the rod and drill motor, as we were getting oil to the oil filter canister, and some of the pushrods. That's where the luck ended. With a three foot cheater bar on the crankshaft nut, we could not budge the crankshaft to turn. Transmission was in neutral.

    Leave a comment:


  • PackardV8
    replied
    The Studebaker V8s had at least three and maybe four different types of rocker adjusting screws
    Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
    Even though there has been much talk here about Early, Earlier and Newer Rocker Arms and Shafts, and different types of Lock Screws, I do not remember ever hearing THIS Term: "Wasp-waist" ??


    The very narrow "wasp-waist" oil passage section between the two threaded sections will trap crud and when it cruds up sufficient to stop oil flow, the unlubricated rocker arm can then run hot enough to turn the crud to hard carbon. Locked up by hard carbon, the screw will be hard enough to turn, sometimes even adjusting the valves will twist the screw in half.

    That's why they must be baked to burn out some of the carbon before removing the screws to clean them. Even with the best technique, we seldom get a set of sixteen of those to all come out without twisting off at least one.

    jack vines

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  • doofus
    replied
    Probably pre 62 adj. screw. just found several hands full while cleaning shop. they are for the lo oiler rocker arms. these were NOS discards, the box had fallen apart. Luck Doofus

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  • StudeRich
    replied
    Even though there has been much talk here about Early, Earlier and Newer Rocker Arms and Shafts, and different types of Lock Screws, I do not remember ever hearing THIS Term: "Wasp-waist" ??

    Is it the type of Lock Screw, it's shape or what?

    Would they only be the Really Old ones, '51 to '54?

    Leave a comment:


  • PackardV8
    replied
    Originally posted by t walgamuth View Post
    In my younger days I started engines without the above precautions and regretted it later. I had a fairly low miles 52 Cad motor which I just unstuck and started up. Too bad the rocker shafts were full of dirt so I ended up doing a full rebuild, perhaps it would have needed it in any case but the dirt in the rocker shaft was really a bad deal. Of course the stude v8 is a virtual clone of the Caddy motor.
    All old-school rocker shaft engines which oil through the rockers, the inside of the shaft will be filled with crud.

    FWIW, we're currently rebuilding a Studebaker V8 which the owner "freshened" himself. He soaked the rocker assemblies in solvent and was proud of how clean it was. But he only cleaned the outside; since he didn't disassemble them, when he ran it, trash from inside the shaft and the rockers took out the bearings.

    To get Studebaker rocker assemblies clean, it all must be disassembled, the soft plugs in the ends of the shafts removed and the interior rodded out with a steel brush. Then, on the early rockers, those with the wasp-waist screws, must be baked in a 600-degree oven to burn the carbon. Even after this treatment some of the screws will break because the carbon is so packed in there. The later rockers don't have that carbon trapping wasp-waist design, so don't have to have the screws removed.

    jack vines

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  • ChampCouple
    replied
    Originally posted by t walgamuth View Post
    In my younger days I started engines without the above precautions and regretted it later. I had a fairly low miles 52 Cad motor which I just unstuck and started up. Too bad the rocker shafts were full of dirt so I ended up doing a full rebuild, perhaps it would have needed it in any case but the dirt in the rocker shaft was really a bad deal. Of course the stude v8 is a virtual clone of the Caddy motor.
    Oh bummer. Guess it really pays to be safer than possibly sorry with low production engines.

    Leave a comment:


  • t walgamuth
    replied
    In my younger days I started engines without the above precautions and regretted it later. I had a fairly low miles 52 Cad motor which I just unstuck and started up. Too bad the rocker shafts were full of dirt so I ended up doing a full rebuild, perhaps it would have needed it in any case but the dirt in the rocker shaft was really a bad deal. Of course the stude v8 is a virtual clone of the Caddy motor.

    Leave a comment:


  • ChampCouple
    replied
    Thanks for all the input, very much appreciated!

    Mike

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  • Mrs K Corbin
    replied
    Oil Pressure Is KING....

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  • StudeRich
    replied
    Unbelievable! A THREE WAY Tie! 5:40 PM each.

    After reading all 3, you should have a good idea of what is needed, I just forgot the Reversible 3/8" or larger Drill trick (the Distributor and Oil pump turn COUNTERCLOCKWISE) but all 3 of us have some good points.

    Jack had a good thought about the Compression Test not being a Priority at this point, maybe later after it has run.

    We are all just here to Help.

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  • DEEPNHOCK
    replied
    (What Jack said...)

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