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  • Exhaust: Exhaust ideas

    I currently have a 62 lark with a 259 v8, and not to sure what exhaust I should get to give it more or a deep rumble.

  • #2
    Duals, if not already ? Add Smithys mufflers, and you are all set

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Flashback View Post
      Duals, if not already ? Add Smithys mufflers, and you are all set
      Its currently a single pipe exhaust, but I'll definitely switch over to the dual set up! And thanks for the recommendation!

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      • #4
        how loud you want it? I dropped mine out in front of the rear wheels with no mufflers at all. hit the loud button...

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        • #5
          It seems that when these questions come about no one has a definitive answer to what mufflers. I guess it is because everyone's taste is different. He wants it quiet, I want a nice rumble, that guy wants raspy straight through glass packs.
          I have had a car with loud glass packs and a long trip was not pleasant. I guess I would err on the side of quieter just because I can't afford to experiment. Your car your choice, but definitely get dual pipes.
          "In the heart of Arkansas."
          Searcy, Arkansas
          1952 Commander 2 door. Really fine 259.
          1952 2R pickup

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          • #6
            Originally posted by 52-fan View Post
            It seems that when these questions come about no one has a definitive answer to what mufflers. I guess it is because everyone's taste is different. He wants it quiet, I want a nice rumble, that guy wants raspy straight through glass packs.
            I have had a car with loud glass packs and a long trip was not pleasant. I guess I would err on the side of quieter just because I can't afford to experiment. Your car your choice, but definitely get dual pipes.
            true, true , true. I'm sure when it comes to mufflers my middle name is LOUD...but two things I've learned (the hard way) over the years when it comes to living with loud...

            -make sure the exhaust pipes do not exit under the car...get the system to run to the outside of the car somewhere...having the exhaust 'dump' anywhere under the car will produce the same effect of having your head stuffed in the middle of a bass drum...plus there is the CO factor to consider.

            - go at least one size larger in diameter than the 'experts' say you need. personally for a 259 I'd go with 2.25" pipes...that will result in a 'deeper' tone...smaller typically means a sharper tone. cheers, junior

            sigpic
            1954 C5 Hamilton car.

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            • #7
              There is something to be said about maintaining the correct amount of back pressure. Too much back pressure and the engine loses power, too little and...?
              RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

              17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
              10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
              10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
              4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
              5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
              56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
              60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

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              • #8
                Part of the unique sound of Studebaker engines is that the exhaust systems were built without crossover pipes to link left and right sides. The limited crossover was through the intake manifold, as I recall. Chevy engines all have the crossover pipes, sound different.
                Gary Ash
                Dartmouth, Mass.

                '32 Indy car replica (in progress)
                ’41 Commander Land Cruiser
                '48 M5
                '65 Wagonaire Commander
                '63 Wagonaire Standard
                web site at http://www.studegarage.com

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Mrs K Corbin View Post
                  how loud you want it? I dropped mine out in front of the rear wheels with no mufflers at all. hit the loud button...
                  I dropped mine out just behind the front wheel with no mufflers, and it's not loud; louder yes but still legal at 3000 rpm. I expected it to be a lot louder. (overbored 289, roughly 298 now, R3 headers)
                  Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_1122.JPG Views:	0 Size:	79.3 KB ID:	1819224
                  The largest tube that will fit at the manifold is 2", any larger and the flange nuts won't fit so you can't attach to the manifold. I used 2" (which is still larger than the exit on the R3 header) for the first few inches then went to 2 1/4", its about 3 feet to the fender.

                  My exhaust does also go back through a resonator from a '17 Mustang then two 10" glasspacks on the way to the rear bumper. It's not loud but sounds good, but not as good as when dumps are open.
                  Click image for larger version  Name:	2019 Exhaust complete.jpg Views:	0 Size:	125.0 KB ID:	1819225
                  Last edited by bensherb; 01-31-2020, 09:42 PM.

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                  • #10
                    Wow, there's a lot going on under there. The driveshaft looks kinda crowded.
                    I would like to have cut-outs/dumps on my 52 just for the looks.
                    "In the heart of Arkansas."
                    Searcy, Arkansas
                    1952 Commander 2 door. Really fine 259.
                    1952 2R pickup

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by 52-fan View Post
                      Wow, there's a lot going on under there. The driveshaft looks kinda crowded.
                      I would like to have cut-outs/dumps on my 52 just for the looks.
                      It just looks that way. Actually there's a fair amount of room around the driveshaft, which is larger than stock. I suppose if I were to get airborne for an extended period it might contact the resonator, but it doesn't when you lift the frame with a jack and let the axle hang, which is necessary to get the tires out from under the fenders.

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                      • #12
                        I want a deeper rumble, but at the same time cut outs/ dumps, I see would be my best option, since then I can keep the regular mufflers but make it crazy loud when I want!

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                        • #13
                          That's what i am doing with my 53.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by garyash View Post
                            Part of the unique sound of Studebaker engines is that the exhaust systems were built without crossover pipes to link left and right sides. The limited crossover was through the intake manifold.
                            For true, Gary, but it is probable there are few Studebaker V8s remaining running with OEM dual exhaust systems. Aftermarket and reproduction exhaust systems are different and usually louder. What we're hearing today may not be the way it was.

                            As mentioned, sensitivity to/tolerance for loud exhausts is an individual thing. We had a thread here recently where a member complained about exhaust resonance on the highway. The solution for that is either a crossover/H-pipe/X-pipe or adding resonator eliminators, neither of which were OEM Studebaker. Since OEM Studebaker exhaust systems are not readily available, each build is a whole new experience, sound and solution.

                            as I recall. Chevy engines all have the crossover pipes, sound different.
                            Minor point, but most early Chevy V8 OEM dual exhaust systems used resonator eliminator canisters behind the rear axle. IIRC, the 1960s Fords began to use H-pipe crossovers behind the headpipes on factory dual exhausts.

                            jack vines
                            Last edited by PackardV8; 02-02-2020, 09:35 AM.
                            PackardV8

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post

                              For true, Gary, but it is probable there are few Studebaker V8s remaining running with OEM dual exhaust systems. Aftermarket and reproduction exhaust systems are different and usually louder. What we're hearing today may not be the way it was.

                              As mentioned, sensitivity to/tolerance for loud exhausts is an individual thing. We had a thread here recently where a member complained about exhaust resonance on the highway. The solution for that is either a crossover/H-pipe/X-pipe or adding resonator eliminators, neither of which were OEM Studebaker. Since OEM Studebaker exhaust systems are not readily available, each build is a whole new experience, sound and solution.

                              Minor point, but most early Chevy V8 OEM dual exhaust systems used resonator eliminator canisters behind the rear axle. IIRC, the 1960s Fords began to use H-pipe crossovers behind the headpipes on factory dual exhausts.

                              jack vines
                              Any recommendations for a good dual exhaust systems or company? Right now I have the OEM single exhaust.

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