Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Do you all follow the shop manual?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Rear Axle: Do you all follow the shop manual?

    So Studebaker "suggests" the rear axle bearings(Spicer/44) be re-packed every 25K miles.
    Just curious as to how often you actually effectuate this "suggestion"?

  • #2
    I have gone as far as 30,000, but usually re-grease them closer to 20,000. While at it, I also inspect and R&R the rear brakes, as needed. I have never found the bearings dry, or looking like they were about to self destruct. They tend to wear gradually, and I make appropriate notes in the maintenance, I,e., "slight brindling, next time will need new bearings".

    Comment


    • #3
      If you have a '56 or Older Car or a 1/2 Ton Truck, you have the Option of using the Plugged hole at the rear of the outboard Axle Tubes to insert a Zerk Fitting and VERY carefully inject some Wheel Bearing Grease (small amount) into the cavity.

      CAUTION: You DO run the risk, since you cannot see what is happening in there, of OVER GREASING the Bearing and causing a Grease Leak past the Inner Seal into the Diff. which may damage the Seal enough to cause 90 Wt. to leak out into the Brake area.
      StudeRich
      Second Generation Stude Driver,
      Proud '54 Starliner Owner

      Comment


      • #4
        Any harm in leaving the Zerk fitting in premanently?...

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by 345 DeSoto View Post
          Any harm in leaving the Zerk fitting in permanently?...
          NONE that I know of.
          It was probably a precaution having a Plug, to allow Factory Trained Studebaker Mechanics who knew about this, to PROPERLY do the job, as opposed to "Grease Monkeys" at Lube Shops and mostly Gas Stations in the Day.

          I have actually seen one of these "Professional" Grease Gun Jockeys try to grease a Brake Bleeder Screw!
          StudeRich
          Second Generation Stude Driver,
          Proud '54 Starliner Owner

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
            If you have a '56 or Older Car or a 1/2 Ton Truck, you have the Option of using the Plugged hole at the rear of the outboard Axle Tubes to insert a Zerk Fitting and VERY carefully inject some Wheel Bearing Grease (small amount) into the cavity.

            CAUTION: You DO run the risk, since you cannot see what is happening in there, of OVER GREASING the Bearing and causing a Grease Leak past the Inner Seal into the Diff. which may damage the Seal enough to cause 90 Wt. to leak out into the Brake area.
            Don't know about all the rear axles but on my '48 Champion Business Coupe, '51 Land Cruiser, and '55 truck, when removing the plug to install the grease fitting, I clean the axle housing and find the tiny "weep" hole that serves to let you know when the grease cavity is full. You can use a straightened small paper clip to clear that little hole. I use either a carburetor jet clearing wire or paint spray gun tip broach ( not everyone has these tools) but the paper clip works fine. The hardest part is finding that little hole because the axle is usually pretty dirty and the hole is tiny. However, once it is cleared/cleaned grease will come out there, relieve pressure, and shouldn't push past either the inner or outer seal. It shouldn't take much, and you should stop pumping as soon as you see the little grease worm squeeze out that hole.

            Another reason to not leave a grease fitting in that area of the axle is that it would be easy to break it off while using a jack, lift, or jack stand. It could also get knocked off from road debris. I would hate to have to try to use an "easy-out" tool to extract a broken grease fitting in that part of an axle.
            John Clary
            Greer, SC

            SDC member since 1975

            Comment


            • #7
              One of these days I am gonna have to upgrade to the repro seal, that is made of rubber instead of felt like the old ones. I still have a supply of the old type, and too cheap to throw them away. Only downside is, if you leave the Stude parked sideways on a steep hill a few hours, the rear endow will seal past the felt and down the axle, inside the taper area, where the tapered hub mates to it. Yes, most will drip off, and down to the drain hole, but some still follows the axle to the tapered area. Once in awhile it will also get on the lower end of the shoes. I run the rear end oil about 1/2" low, to alleviate this. It's only an issue for me here in KY, never noticed it in California. LOL

              When I installed flanged axles in the 63GT, I included the rubber, inner seals, and tapped the axle housings to install the subject grease zert plugs. Mainly because I never wanna come back inside that rear end. But I probably will, if still able, in 20-30 thousand miles, since I prefer to keep an eye on rear bearing wear.

              Comment


              • #8
                Joe,
                I heartily agree with the zerks as years ago on an old Suburban 4x4 with Dana 60 front axle, I installed the zerks and filled the tubes with grease figuring it would provide protection against contamination while running submerged crossing streams etc. It worked as I suffered no internal damage.
                Bill

                Comment

                Working...
                X