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Painting over lead

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  • #16
    There is also a product called "Eliminator" it is made by Morton Paints. It is basically fiberglass with gray pigment in it. You literally mix it with fiberglass hardener.
    It sprays out well, will stick to EVERYTHING, mix ONLY what you can spray in 5-10 minutes, clean out the spay gun as soon as you're finished, or throw it away.
    Eliminator will cure as hard as fiberglass. You will have a lot more success wet sanding it vs. dry sanding. There is also another product called "Feather Fill" it is supposed to be just like Eliminator, I have not used Feather Fill.
    Eliminator is not cheap! "about" $125 a gallon a few years ago. As with ANY product, you get what you pay for, and pay for what you get!

    Jim
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    • #17
      Originally posted by 52 Ragtop View Post
      There is also a product called "Eliminator" it is made by Morton Paints. It is basically fiberglass with gray pigment in it. You literally mix it with fiberglass hardener.

      Jim
      So, this material is actually either epoxy resin or polyester resin? It can't be "fiberglass" as such because that is silicon-based glass, in fiber form.
      -Dwight

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      • #18
        "the ppg pait store said epoxy primer should seal it, but my 50 starlight is bubbled up at the leaded seams by the trunk and we used epoxy primer on it."

        I suspect there was/ is a cantamination issue; not the lead.

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        • #19
          Once plastics became available, lead was replaced.
          "Bondo" and other brands came on the scene in the late 50s. GM was still leading seams in the early 80s. Why? Because it is faster than plastic! As soon as it cools below "plastic" stage, it can be filed to finish shape. Then on down the assembly line..... Plastic filler has to cure before it can be filed/sanded to shape.
          Frank DuVal

          50 Commander 4 door

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          • #20
            I still use lead on many things. Motorcycle gas tanks for one, and certain types of seams, though a good inexpensive bonding agent could take care for those, just haven't found one that fits both qualifiers yet.

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            • #21
              Originally posted by Frank DuVal View Post

              "Bondo" and other brands came on the scene in the late 50s. GM was still leading seams in the early 80s. Why? Because it is faster than plastic! As soon as it cools below "plastic" stage, it can be filed to finish shape. Then on down the assembly line..... Plastic filler has to cure before it can be filed/sanded to shape.
              My 69 Z/28 came from the factory with lead in the seam between the quarter panel and the roof panel. As noted GM used it for many years. BTW, it was done poorly FROM THE FACTORY, so I re-applied and smoothed it over. I much prefer using lead than plastic. Lead will never shrink. Plastic always shrinks to some degree. If I wanted my roof seam done in plastic, I would have to apply and wait months to finish it, hoping that I did not need to apply another layer.

              Because my car is black, and because that sail panel area is so conspicuous, I needed it perfect. Car came out pretty nice. Paint is now 8 years old, and no bubbling at the lead seam. Click image for larger version

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