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  • Paint: Painting over lead

    Getting ready to primer my 64 cruiser. Any advice on what to put on the lead on the roof seams and the old body work on the passenger door to get the paint to stick and not bubble up in a few years?

    the ppg pait store said epoxy primer should seal it, but my 50 starlight is bubbled up at the leaded seams by the trunk and we used epoxy primer on it.



    Attached Files

  • #2
    I used epoxy primer on a 60 Hawk. At the two year mark, it still looks good. When I stripped and sanded the old paint, it didn't appear that they had done anything special at the factory. It had one respray, buy the original paint and primer were still very intact over the lead. Good luck with the Paint!

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    • #3
      Just make sure it is clean, metal prep around it, and scuff with a grey scotchbrite and you will be fine.
      Bez Auto Alchemy
      573-318-8948
      http://bezautoalchemy.com


      "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

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      • #4
        Painting is a lot like planning a wedding. Hard work, doing your due diligence investing in time and preparation. Thoroughly removing anything that might contaminate the outcome. Epoxy primer is the best I know of sealing a clean substrate from corrosive oxygen. Any chemical residue that could interfere with proper chemical adhesion (oil, silicone, sweat, etc.), can cause fish-eye, bubbling, crazing, etc. Do your best to get it clean and properly prepped. Then, (like a wedding), the actual painting will be "anti-climatic" by comparison to all the time and work put into getting the substrate ready to paint.

        I have sold some of the most sophisticated paint systems in existence. In order to sell the equipment, I studied and worked to familiarize myself with the required technical knowledge. (Worked out great for my car hobby!) That included basic handheld equipment to robots & automated systems. Even then...all of my automotive and industrial accounts had "Final Finish & Repair" departments to correct and repair occasional flaws & hiccups.

        Just don't let yourself become paralyzed into inaction by fear of doing something wrong. Steel and iron will rust...soft metals, (aluminum, lead, copper, etc.) will oxidize/corrode. The trick is to seal it from exposure to the contaminants and prep the surface for the best adhesion possible.

        While I find it easy to make the statements I have just typed in here...I made my living selling and not "using" the equipment. Therefore, I often started my classes on the subject with a disclaimer..."I'm no painter and I have the cars to prove it!" I have the utmost respect for the folks that actually operate and earn their living "using" such equipment.
        John Clary
        Greer, SC

        SDC member since 1975

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        • #5
          Nothing better than epoxy on properly prepped surface.
          Wayne
          "Trying to shed my CASO ways"

          sigpic‚Äč

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          • #6
            Originally posted by bezhawk View Post
            Just make sure it is clean, metal prep around it, and scuff with a grey scotchbrite and you will be fine.
            This is about what I was going to say, based on painting lead seams on customs in the 1950s.
            Gary L.
            Wappinger, NY

            SDC member since 1968
            Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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            • #7
              I've painted over hundreds of pounds of lead with plain old laquer primer and laquer, synthetic and acrylic enamel and urethane and never had a problem with it lifting. I did once have it lift after several years on brass; I fixed it by removing the plastic filler that was there and leadding over the brass, before repainting it.
              sigpic

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              • #8
                Thanks guys. Ill clean everything really well and spray it with epoxy primer.

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                • #9
                  I have had good luck by lightly grinding the lead and appling a good grade of body filler over it to seal the lead under the filler.
                  The lead usually needs to be smoothed over anyway. The plastic adheres to the lead well and then the primers adhere to the plastic.
                  Have used this method for 30 years or so with good results on 55-57 T-Birds that are unibody with every welded seam leaded.
                  Some of the newer primers may bite into that lead, but it's always a crap shoot. If there's ever a paint failure, it's usually over the lead joints. Another point on that is to melt out all of the old lead (often finding rust and poor welds under it) and then cleaning and filling the seam with a good waterproof marine filler. Lead was used because it was what they had. Once plastics became available, lead was replaced.
                  I always look at it as: The Space Shuttle was not made with any lead, but a lot of plastics.
                  sigpic1966 Daytona (The First One)
                  1950 Champion Convertible
                  1950 Champion 4Dr
                  1955 President 2 Dr Hardtop
                  1957 Thunderbird

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                  • #10
                    Plastic will stick better over epoxy than any bare metal (roughened up or not). A chemical bond is stronger than a mechanical bond. The best epoxy I use is a Sherwin-Williams product called Genesis. The main reason being is you can sand it without gumming up the sandpaper. Something you can't do with PPG DP products. Lots of people swear by SPI products, but you get what you pay for. There is a reason they are less expensive.
                    Bez Auto Alchemy
                    573-318-8948
                    http://bezautoalchemy.com


                    "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

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                    • #11
                      Bez I use Spi and love it. Both their epoxy and clears. Have yet to find anything better and been doing this for just a couple years short of 50 years. As Berry the owner of SPI says the reason his prices are less is his overhead, and he doesn't give anything away for free. No Million dollar sponsoring of race cars or TV shows. If you haven't tried it get a qt of epoxy and a qt of their universal clear. You will be impressed.

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                      • #12
                        Forgot to add customer service is unreal. I had a question on the epoxy on a Sat. afternoon and called the tech hot line and thinking I would get a call back on Monday. Phone picked up and Berry the owner of the company was on the line and you could tell he was at home as I could hear kids in the background. Answered everything I wanted and really knew what he was talking about. Hell of a nice guy to boot.

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                        • #13
                          I like the SPI epoxy primer also.

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                          • #14
                            Well I used 2 coats of black epoxy primer then 2 coats of 2k filler primer. Now for the "fun" part. Blocking then filling dents.
                            Attached Files

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                            • #15
                              Block party time!!

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