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  • Engine: Oil Filter Problem

    I find it hard to believe but for some reason everything I try to do, no matter how simple, becomes a major problem. I just had my 79th birthday last month. Maybe it is dementia setting in.
    Today's problem, a simple oil change. I changed the oil and went to change the filter. No luck. I cannot get the old filter off. It has only been about 18 months since I changed the oil.
    I always make it a point to not tighten the filter too tight.
    I have now destroyed the filter and I am not sure how to proceed.

    The engine is a 289 from a President. It is a spin on filter. I am now wondering if I was trying to tighten it instead of remove it. Unless my memory has failed me, you tighten clockwise and remove counter clockwise. Is that correct? I have now destroyed the filter and the filter"wrench/grip" will not hold.

    I would appreciate any suggestions to get the filter off. Thanks.

  • #2
    Righty tighty... Lefty loosy...
    Counter clockwise to remove.
    HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

    Jeff


    Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

    Comment


    • #3
      If there is enough of the filter left, you could drive a punch, or screwdriver, through both sides of the filter and use that as a lever to turn the filter counter clockwise. Be sure you are not too close to the base as the the threads of the adapter protrude an inch or so.
      78 Avanti RQB 2792
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      Comment


      • #4
        Sorry for your trouble on the filter. I too have had occasional difficulty with removing a filter. Sometimes when one was torqued on too tight, or the filter was installed without properly oiling the gasket. It can also occur when an oil change is just not done in a timely manner. If I understand correctly... it is a by pass...you can simply remove the entire assembly, plug the oil holes, remove the entire assembly and deal with it off the engine.

        On a disposable spin on filter that has collapsed or deformed, I have been able to remove those by wrapping a piece of rough sandpaper between the strap wrench and filter allowing a good enough grip to spin it off. I have also heard of folks puncturing a big screwdriver through the filter and leveraging it off. Fortunately, I have never had to do anything that drastic. Let us know how it works out.
        John Clary
        Greer, SC

        SDC member since 1975

        Comment


        • #5
          That is one of those filters that mounts "upside down." Be sure that you are looking down on the filter when determining the direction to unscrew it. I really doubt that it can be cross threaded. I don't believe that you could have gotten an oil tight seal that way. You may have started to turn the filter the incorrect way and got it extremely tight. If you can't get the filter loose on the engine, remove the assembly and work on it on a bench. (Don't blame age. I am older than you are.)
          Gary L.
          Wappinger, NY

          SDC member since 1968
          Studebaker enthusiast much longer

          Comment


          • #6
            It is very easy to turn the wrong way when using oil filter wrenches, because of how they fit and how they work in tight spaces.

            It may be possible that it just got locked on there too tight. If it does not come off, remove the housing is a good idea if poking through it it does not work. . The problem with removing the housing is that it is very hard to hold when it is off of the engine without gouging it or cracking it.. If it does not come off easily, it will likely damage the housing just trying to hold it.

            The best way to hold it is to bolt it back onto something. If it breaks- they are kind of rare, but replaceable.

            I have one of those STP-7 's stuck on a housing hanging on the wall of shame.

            Comment


            • #7
              Last I looked SI still had those bases in stock
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              Claude Chmielewski
              Studeski
              http://www.studeski.com
              Fillmore, Wisconsin
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              Comment


              • #8
                Thank all of you for the responses. I did not realize you could remove the mount until it was mentioned. Fortunately I did not have to do this. I had used a "strap" type oil filter wrench and actually caved the filter in like a young ladies waist in two places. Of course the wrench would then start to slip. I also used a monkey wrench but it just tore the filter up even worse.
                I finally went back to the strap oil wrench and used a piece of course sandpaper as recommended by jclary.

                I consider myself to be strong for my age and I weigh about 190. I strained with all of my strength and then began to bounce my weight against the wrench handle until I could see it start to bend. All of a sudden it looked like the filter moved about a half inch. I gave it one more try and it moved an inch. From that point it turned easily.

                I looked closely at the bottom of the filter and the face of the mount. Everything was clean and no damage. I looked at the threaded fitting and it was oiled and perfect. I have no idea why it was stuck so tight.

                I did skip changing the filter the last time I changed the oil. I thought as the filter only filters a small part of the oil at a time, it should be good for two oil changes.
                I learned a bitter lesson. I will go back to changing the filter every time. Thanks again for all of the help.

                Comment


                • #9
                  As noted by John in post #4, it's more important to oil the filter gasket than the threaded fitting.
                  Skip Lackie

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I had two filters of the same well known brand on two different cars not want to come off. The sheet metal housing just shears when trying to remove. I swapped to another well known brand and never had another issue. At the time, it seemed the housing of the latter had thicker metal ...but maybe now I use more care to not over tighten. I watch and count those 1/4 turn indicator marks on the filter now with diligence.
                    Also, It only took one time for the old gasket to stick to the block and a floor flooded with oil....that I now check and make sure the old gasket comes off with the old filter!!
                    Like an old boss of mine use to say.....education costs!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Glad you got success. I imagine the fact that filters use thinner metal just like our beer cans as I remember when you couldn't crush those with one hand.
                      Best of luck in the future.
                      Bill

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Some filters have a multi point bottom and there is an aluminum "socket" for a 1/2" drive that makes the job relatively easy. There is also tapered aluminum "sockets" with a rubber friction ring for a 1/2" drive available.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I find that a rubber strap wrench works better than most oil filter wrenches that use a steel band.
                          Gary L.
                          Wappinger, NY

                          SDC member since 1968
                          Studebaker enthusiast much longer

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Remember trying to remove filter from a Cadillac that had been to Jiffy Lube. Took hours! Figure it had been installed by a" technician" with the strength and probably the IQ of a gorilla. Always lubricate the base gasket with clean motor oil and tighten the filter to 3/4 turn past first contact with the base. It is tempting to just snug it up a little more. Lotta helpful hints.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Jeffry Cassel View Post
                              Remember trying to remove filter from a Cadillac that had been to Jiffy Lube. Took hours! Figure it had been installed by a" technician" with the strength and probably the IQ of a gorilla. Always lubricate the base gasket with clean motor oil and tighten the filter to 3/4 turn past first contact with the base. It is tempting to just snug it up a little more. Lotta helpful hints.
                              Been there. Done that. Very frustrating.

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