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oil drain holes

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  • Engine: oil drain holes

    I've read through several post on the forum indicating that the oil drain holes in the heads are insufficient in draining the oil back to the sump on on long trips. Can the drain holes in the head and block be drilled out to help? If so what is the largest diameter before going through to a water jacket?


  • #2
    On the late engines the holes were opened up .031". They went from 11/32 to 3/8. The oil feed hole in the rocker shaft was also made smaller restricting oil to the top of the engine.
    james r pepper

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    • #3
      James,
      When was the change in oil drain holes and oil feed holes made?
      I presume that the original 289 V8 engine # P95999 in my 63 GT Hawk is a later engine with the newer specifications.
      Mark.
      Last edited by Ermine White; 12-04-2019, 08:26 AM.

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      • #4
        Just be careful opening up the drain holes in the block.
        Past sonic testing has shown that the cylinder wall thickness is pretty thin right there, and drilling it more could make a thin situation even thinner.



        Last edited by DEEPNHOCK; 12-04-2019, 08:27 AM.
        HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

        Jeff


        Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



        Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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        • #5
          Originally posted by jwitt View Post
          I've read through several post on the forum indicating that the oil drain holes in the heads are insufficient in draining the oil back to the sump on on long trips. Can the drain holes in the head and block be drilled out to help? If so what is the largest diameter before going through to a water jacket?
          I do not know if you are referring to a V8 or a six. On the V8s, I suggest keeping the drains clear, the oil clean and do not use too high of a viscosity oil. On the sixes, I have seen external drains successfully used.
          Gary L.
          Wappinger, NY

          SDC member since 1968
          Studebaker enthusiast much longer

          Comment


          • #6
            Good point, but he said heads (plural), so it should be assumed he meant a V8 engine.
            I would like to see some pic's of a supplemental oil drain setup, six cyl or V8.


            Originally posted by studegary View Post

            I do not know if you are referring to a V8 or a six. On the V8s, I suggest keeping the drains clear, the oil clean and do not use too high of a viscosity oil. On the sixes, I have seen external drains successfully used.
            HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

            Jeff


            Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



            Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

            Comment


            • #7
              Are the oil drain holes in the heads insufficient? Speaking for 259/289 there is no problem in normal service. To me, normal service would be cruising or otherwise sustained RPM at or below 3000. It does not matter how far you drive, i.e. from tank to tank, you will never have a problem. This may also be true at much higher RPM, but I can only speak from experience about 3000 and below. To give some idea of RPM at road speeds: with a 3.73 rear end and 27" tall tires, 3000 RPM is 66 MPH; with a 3.31 it is 72 MPH, with a 3.07, it is 78 MPH. With an OD, RPM is really not even worth calculating, for purposes of this thread.

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              • #8
                You can't do too much to the holes in the block. Going bigger won't get you too far when the choke point will still be the dowel pin/sleeve.
                Also, it's got little to do with "long" trips. As long as the head and block holes are clean, and you aren't using 70w oil...they will work fine on a drive from the East Coast to a West Coast trip. Unless you are driving the north side of 100mph the whole trip.

                I don't know the particulars of material thickness, but... I started to look into this at one time, and never did.
                As a friend of mine did in his Chrysler powered Drag Racer, he drilled and tapped two holes in the cylinder head, just below the rocker cover gasket surface, and ran two oil drain lines to the oil pan on each side of the engine.

                IF...there is sufficient material thickness in the horizontal surface to dig out a small trough that would lead to drilled and tapped holes in the side of the heads, the same thing could easily be done. "One" additional hole per head would be plenty enough. You'd just need to remember to install the head on the correct side of the block, as a hole in the front would do no good..! Or...drill and tap two holes, and plug the front most hole.

                As I write this, it might be a very easy task at that. Thinking about it, I'd bet it would be simple to drill and tap (1/8" NPT) a hole adjacent to the current drain back hole. There should be plenty of material there for a hole that size. And a second drain right there should be plenty for sufficient drain-back.

                I have a junk head, I'll give it a try, and then check the left over material for safety (cracking) sake.

                Mike

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                • #9
                  IIRC, wasn't Mike's method used on the Holman & Moody Larks?

                  JT

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                  • #10
                    Seems like much ado about nothing to quote Shakespeare. I had a new 59 Hawk with a 259 V/8. It had two speeds...stopped and wide open its entire life. Finally the family got to big and had to trade it off for a station wagon at 80,000 trouble free miles. I did however religiously change the oil and filter every 1500 miles.

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                    • #11
                      E. Davis has a point.
                      I had to get to a SDC Regional Meet in Meridian, MS in 1988. I had worked all that night and knew I should not drive so my girlfriend (wife now) drove the 1963 GT Hawk with original 289 V8 while I slept in the back seat. BTW, very uncomfortable for a 6'8" person.
                      I slept while she drove but finally awoke to the sound of a higher revving engine sound than I was used to. Half asleep, I thought to myself, "Oh no, you forgot to tell her that the transmission is a T-10 4 speed and she is driving at interstate speed in 3rd gear."
                      Upon fully awakening and sitting up I realized she was driving at 90 mph in 4th gear! I did not look at the tachometer or oil pressure gauge but the engine was not overheating and was running smooth at that rpm without hesitation.
                      I asked her how long she had been at that speed and she said as soon as I went to sleep.
                      That would have been about 200 miles.
                      I don't condone that activity but it may make an anecdotal point of oil flow from the heads of a post '62, full flow 289 V8 on a long trip.
                      By the way, we got to the meet on time.
                      Like E. Davis, I have always used top quality engine oil and filters and done regular oil/filter changes.
                      Mark.
                      Last edited by Ermine White; Yesterday, 04:19 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by DEEPNHOCK View Post
                        Good point, but he said heads (plural), so it should be assumed he meant a V8 engine.
                        I would like to see some pic's of a supplemental oil drain setup, six cyl or V8.



                        When I saw "heads, I thought that he meant heads in general, not necessarily on one engine (but it probably is a V8 - didn't want to assume).
                        I do not have pic's, but I remember drain lines coming from the lowest point of the rocker arm cover on OHV sixes.
                        Last edited by studegary; 12-04-2019, 07:01 PM. Reason: missing d
                        Gary L.
                        Wappinger, NY

                        SDC member since 1968
                        Studebaker enthusiast much longer

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          E. Davis -

                          Um...yea...see the last sentence in the first paragraph of my note above.
                          A coupla times when going from my house to the drag strip in Bakersfield (Famoso), there's a stretch or road a few miles long with no exits or entrances to the freeway. ALWAYS good for a little "laying down the throttle".
                          Topping out at around 118 or so mph on my speedometer, I had no obvious oil pressure problems. And yes, my speedometer was -1 mph at 70 mph according to the AAA's check machine that used to come around to the AAA offices. And...a cop that stopped me leaving the same drag strip on one trip going 80 mph..!

                          Anyway, again, enough oil in the pan to keep the pickup properly covered according to my Autometer pressure gauge.

                          Mike

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by JoeHall View Post
                            To give some idea of RPM at road speeds: with a 3.73 rear end and 27" tall tires, 3000 RPM is 66 MPH; with a 3.31 it is 72 MPH, with a 3.07, it is 78 MPH. With an OD, RPM is really not even worth calculating, for purposes of this thread.
                            My '62 with a 3.54 axle, 27.18 diameter tires and OD runs at just under 83 mph at 2500 RPM. Almost 100 mph at 3000. Rational freeway speed is only 2000 rpm.

                            sigpic

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                            • #15
                              When I built my R4 clone years ago, I deburred and chamfered all of the oil drain back holes in both the cylinder heads and the block. I also painted the inside valley/lifter area and inside block with Glyptal Special Coating in order to lower the resistance and assist the oil return to the pan. I also performed the same gasket matching and chamfering for the water passages. It must have been of some assistance as in it's day, it repeatedly saw 6000 rpm and lived. I concur with Joe's findings as with 3:73's I am turning approximately the same 3000 RPM at approximately 60+ mph.
                              Bill

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