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Avanti II brakes

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  • Brakes: Avanti II brakes

    Recently bought a 1970 Avanti II. Super excited about this car, but it's got a leaking rear wheel cylinder, and I can't find a parts listing or application. Anybody know a part # or crossover application?

  • #2
    Get what you need from one of the Studebaker vendors such as Myer's Studebaker, Studebaker International or Nostalgic Motors. Local parts houses won't list it and they'll give you the deer caught in the headlights look when you tell them what car it's for. Suppliers such as NAPA have consolidated numbers for older vehicles and the parts...while they might fit...won't work properly. Don't ask how I know.
    Poet...Mystic...Soldier of Fortune. As always...self-absorbed, adversarial, cocky and in general a malcontent.

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    • #3
      If I recall, it's a 3/4" ID cylinder. Rebuild kits are reasonably priced, but be prepared to reach deeper into your wallet for a new cylinder assembly. To refurbish the old 3/4" bore, it may be difficult to find a hone that will adjust down to 3/4". But you could probably make do with a split 3/8" bolt stud and emery cloth threaded into the split, and a drill.

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      • #4
        I agree with parts houses giving you the wrong one, the one that most offer is something like 1 1/4" bore, which will make teh rear brakes almost useless. Consider sending your old cylinders to White Post Restoration (or others) that will reline it with bronze or stainless steel sleeves, for a lifetime fix. It's almost exactly teh same price as new ones.
        Ron Dame
        '63 Champ

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        • #5
          Paul,
          I agree with each of the post listed above.
          I highly agree with Ron Dame's recommendation. White Post Restoration relined all of the wheel cylinders and the master cylinder for my 1963 Studebaker GT Hawk with bronze sleeves. The job was done perfectly and I anticipate that the work will last a lifetime. The price was reasonable for the work done.
          I feel that the value of relining will exceed the value of new parts since the bronze sleeves will resist corrosion better.
          Mark.

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          • #6
            I don't know the cost for White Post to reline the wheel cylinders but Myer's Studebaker sells quality repops of the wheel cylinder new.
            Poet...Mystic...Soldier of Fortune. As always...self-absorbed, adversarial, cocky and in general a malcontent.

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            • #7
              Gunslinger,
              I completely agree that several vendors, including Myer's Studebaker, sell quality reproduction wheel and master cylinders.
              I got tired of replacing those quality repo cylinders and chose to reline all my cylinders and be done with it.

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              • #8
                I just went the OTHER WAY on my '63 Avanti: all (3) New Wagner & Bendix USA Hydraulic Cylinders, (4) Fresh New Calipers from Japan and Lifetime DOT 5 Silicone Brake Fluid.
                SAME result as re-sleeved, for WAY less Money.
                StudeRich
                Second Generation Stude Driver,
                Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Ron Dame View Post
                  Consider sending your old cylinders to White Post Restoration (or others) that will reline it with bronze or stainless steel sleeves, for a lifetime fix. .
                  Don't believe that "lifetime" sales pitch. I did my 50 Commander cylinders with White Post some 30 years ago and they still went bad. Of course, I was dumb enough to let the car sit in the garage for some ten years or more. I can't really blame White Post for my stupidity/laziness, but I actually believed the "lifetime" sales pitch.
                  RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

                  17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
                  10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
                  10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
                  4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
                  5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
                  56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
                  60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

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                  • #10
                    Use a Berry Hone of the right size.does a good job quickly and lasts a good long time. Luck Doofus

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                    • #11
                      What's your serial number? My '70 is RQA 0330.

                      Studerich, can you elaborate on those hydraulic cylinders you used?
                      Mike Sal

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                      • #12
                        Hi Paul (&Mike),
                        My '70 is RQA 0332.
                        This is what I used to substantially improve the stopping power of the original discs(2 1/4"):

                        http://www.hyedracyl.com/studabkr.html

                        Luck,
                        Bill

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                        • #13
                          StudeRich,
                          When I acquired my 63 GT Hawk in 1983, I rebuilt the original Wagner wheel cylinders and master cylinder. When I found out about DOT 5 Silicone brake fluid, I flushed the entire system with and maintained DOT 5 Silicone. After I stopped driving the Hawk as my daily driver, the car sat for several years (big mistake on my part!!) When I started to drive it again, most of the cylinders were leaking from heavily pitted cylinders again. That is when I decided to have all manner of cylinders bronze sleeved by White Post.
                          My question is: Why did the DOT 5 Silicone brake fluid not prevent water from entering the hydraulic system and prevent all of the rust formation in the cast iron wheel cylinders?
                          Mark.

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                          • #14
                            Am not Rich, but will attempt to answer question above. Every time you step on the brake pedal, brake fluid is forced out to the wheel cylinders, and a small amount of air is sucked into the MC to replace it. That air will include water molecules. Depending on a lot of factors (temperature, humidity, number of times brakes applied, etc), some of that water will either be absorbed into the brake fluid (DOT3) or end up as unmixed tiny droplets in the brake fluid (DOT 5). These droplets will eventually tend to migrate to the ends of the brake lines and/or the lowest points of the brake lines.

                            Rich can probably improve on this explanation.
                            Skip Lackie

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