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My Stude is leaking a lot of oil. Any suggestions?

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  • Engine: My Stude is leaking a lot of oil. Any suggestions?

    I bought this '49 2R5 pickup in July and it didn't leak very much at all. In the last month it's been leaking worse and worse. I tried to tighten the bolts in the round piece in front of the oil pan (Sorry-I don't know what you call it) and they wouldn't tighten very tight at all so today I removed two of them and they're different lengths. (See pics) Should they be longer than that? Another half an inch maybe? Could this be the cause of the leaking oil? As you can see from the pic of my garage floor it leaks pretty good when the engine is running. ***NOTE: I moved the truck over a little so I wouldn't have to lie in the oil but the leak is directly under the center of the engine.*** Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_0208.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	52.5 KB ID:	1811912Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_0211.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	81.5 KB ID:	1811913Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_0213.jpeg Views:	0 Size:	57.1 KB ID:	1811914 Any help would be appreciated. Thanks in advance....
    1949 Studebaker 2R5 half ton pickup...

  • #2
    I forgot to mention that the engine is a 289-2v out of a '62 Hawk....
    1949 Studebaker 2R5 half ton pickup...

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    • #3
      The good news is, if it's a bad lek, it should be easier to find. The leak could be coming from half a dozen places, so best to first nail down the source. I'd suggest wiping it down real clean and dry in the entire suspected area. Then, get a strong light and position yourself to be able to eyeball it with the motor running. Look carefully for the first seeps or drops to appear, and any trailing that may reveal where they originate from. Once you find the source, it is not too difficult to address on the front of the motor, especially in a truck, where there's quite a bit of room.

      Be careful about tightening bolts at random, unless they are loose. If overly tightened, you could strip aluminum threads, or squish cork gaskets.

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      • #4
        Those bolts go into an aluminum filler block behind the lower timing cover & the filler block threads can get stripped.
        (Perhaps why "they wouldn't tighten?)
        Others have posted about using heli-coils to restore the threads, but you have removed the filler block you can also drill the bolt holes all the way through, and epoxy in bolts with the heads toward the crankshaft & the threads coming out through the timing cover & lock washers & nuts out front.
        These will NOT strip out!

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        • #5
          I bought some bolts that were half an inch longer and have put in three of them so far. I ran the engine for 5 minutes and didn't see any oil leaking so that's cool. I'm going to try to replace the rest of them but am not sure if I can reach up that high. Thanks for the responses....
          1949 Studebaker 2R5 half ton pickup...

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          • #6
            Yep, as long as possible is better, I also like to slather those bolts with my favorite gasket sealer.

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            • #7
              The leaking issue at the Aluminum Filler Block is almost always warping on the formerly level and true surface of the Block between each Screw that the Timing Cover Gasket seals on. No amount of longer screws will fix that.
              StudeRich
              Second Generation Stude Driver,
              Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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              • #8
                The standard screws that go into the aluminum spacer are too short and only go in about three turns and will strip very easily, longer screws will help. On my 259 they were all stripped out and there was enough material to drill the over to 3/8 with one inch screws. A PO had Heli coiled them with the same short screws and restriped them, longer screws would not have stripped out. There was no recovery with the 5/16 screws therefore I used 3/8, the holes in the cover fit the 3/8 with no problem, it was a perfect fit with no leaks.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
                  The leaking issue at the Aluminum Filler Block is almost always warping on the formerly level and true surface of the Block between each Screw that the Timing Cover Gasket seals on. No amount of longer screws will fix that.
                  The condition you describe is most always caused by bolts that are too short, and over-tightened. Use longer bolts, good gasket sealer, and don't go crazy with the torque.

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                  • #10
                    Don't forget that the bolt holes are not open all the way through. Using too long bolts will bottom out or possibly break out through the back of the filler block.

                    Roger List
                    Roger W. List
                    Proud Studebaker Owner

                    sigpic

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Roger L. View Post
                      Don't forget that the bolt holes are not open all the way through. Using too long bolts will bottom out or possibly break out through the back of the filler block.

                      Roger List
                      That is why you use something like a nylon tie-tie to measure the depth, then subtract about .100". You can then use small flat washers as spacers if the selected bolt is only a tad too long, or grind to fit. Important, as others have mentioned, to take advantage of ALL the threads in the soft aluminum cover. Why anyone would install a short bolt in that application is beyond me. As mentioned before, the problem is also compounded by over torquing. Once properly sealed in place, those bolts should only need snugged up occasionally, till the next overhaul 100,000 miles or so later.
                      Last edited by JoeHall; 11-28-2019, 06:00 AM.

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                      • #12
                        All three bolts that I have removed so far are different lengths. Is that the way they did it at the factory? My guess is no. Also, the longest bolt is what I'm using to replace the others. I'm going to replace as many as I can. I bought a 1/2" ratcheting box wrench yesterday so hopefully that will make the job easier on the higher bolts....
                        Click image for larger version

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                        1949 Studebaker 2R5 half ton pickup...

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                        • #13
                          There are a total of 13 bolts in the cover the four in the Aluminum spacer are 7/8" they could be replaced with 1 1/4" safely, the remainder except for the two at the water inlet can remain at 7/8".

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                          • #14
                            Correction I meant to say "fuel pump" housing.

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                            • #15
                              altair,
                              When the discussion is wrapping up I like that someone gives a concise answer to my question. What is the optimum (& practical) size and length of the bolts needed for the original problem presented in the post.
                              Thank you for your post.
                              Mark.
                              Last edited by Ermine White; 11-29-2019, 10:20 AM.

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