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How can I get my 64 GT quieter?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by jbwhttail View Post
    I agree with Joe Hall. When we started our restoration on the 64 GT I chose to go with a spray bed liner on the inside and out of the car "tub" as well as inside all the fenders. It is amazing how quiet the car has become as well as insulating.
    For true. When my custom C-body was a shell on the rotisserie, I had it sprayed inside and underneath with bed liner. I've never seen anyone try to apply this solution to a completed running car.

    jack vines

    PackardV8

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    • #17
      Be careful what you buy in "rubber roofing" the tar based stuff will soften and smell to high heaven. The butyl rubber "ice shield" would probably be OK but I'd still use the aluminum foiled covered stuff "Dynamat et. al." as it's cheap on a relative scale and will reflect heat.

      Judy doesn't like riding in my cars mainly due to the exhaust systems. I figure if I want quiet, I'll drive my Ram or her Toyota.

      After you chase noise all over the place and find out it's difficult at best to get it under control in these cars, buy her a cheap set of noise canceling headphones (Amazon has a ton), plug them into an old smart phone with a free app like Spotify and let her listen to her favorite music/podcasts/books on route. Heck, a happy wife might be worth the $10/mo they charge for their premium service.

      On the same note, I signed up for Spotify premium and got Hulu for free with it last year. The $10/mo is well worth the cost as I've built up a large collection of music I didn't know existed and play it through the Android Auto in my Ram whenever I'm on the road.

      Bob

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      • #18
        Rattles and squeaks can be stopped, but the hard part is finding the source; road noise can be reduced significantly with sound deadening materials; exhaust can be quietened with regular mufflers, but wind noise is hardest to reduce due to the hardtop design. My son and I went out earlier today for 40 miles in the 63GT, 20 miles out and 20 back. Going out, we were pushing a very strong headwind, and needed to speak a bit louder to each other in order to be heard. Coming home, with a tail wind, the car was almost as quiet as a modern brand X. I have heard C body Hawks are quieter, but never had one, so cannot say.

        Common rattle sources: the hood torsion bar, that whacks the upper part of the firewall when hitting bumps. It has a rubber sleeve on each side, but they often become lost or shift away from the spots they are prone to hitting. Also, on a hardtop, the window rollers can rattle a lot, and usually the only cure is new felt and rollers. The front and rear springs are prone to squeaking, as are loose bumper bolts, door hinges, and dry outer 'A' arm pivot pins.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by JoeHall View Post
          Dynamite is old technology, and does a poor job at noise and temp control.
          True, but with the exception of a lot of noise for a split second it would solve the issue.


          Wow, all these complaints about noise. I guess I got a good one; I knew my GT was a decent car when I got it, but didn't realize it was exceptional. It's surprisingly quiet, with no problem talking or listening to the radio. The car is pretty tight with no rattles, well, except what is normal when going over railroad tracks or driving on a washboard road. In fact the only noises it had, (fixed now) was a bad right rear shock upper bushing, so it rattled, and wind noise from the hole someone butchered throught the firewall to install AC, and a missing "gill vent" gasket. Currently I have no insulation or anything on the firewall, just metal, (haven't replaced it yet) but there's no significant difference from when it was there. But, I no longer have ANY open or partially open penetrations in the floor or firewall, all the pedal, master cylinder and steering column openings have been sealed with steel sheet, that AC hole welded up and all wire and cable grommets have been replaced. The thing that amazed me the most is how quiet it is with the windows down; WAY better than any other hardtop I've ever had.
          Last edited by bensherb; 11-27-2019, 12:31 PM.
          sigpic

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          • #20
            Originally posted by bensherb View Post

            True, but with the exception of a lot of noise for a split second it would solve the issue.
            Darn auto-correct spell checker. LOL

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            • #21
              Wow, I really appreciate all the suggestions. I really have my work cut out for me. My floor is well insulated with the tar foil backed deadener sheets with thick jute mats under the carpet. However, the firewall just has the reproduction original style cover (with the fiberglass on door panel material). I glued carpet over that. I guess that is just not enough.

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              • #22
                Today, the wife and I rode 180 miles in the 63GT, mostly interstate at around 70 MPH. We talked a lot, and did not need to raise our voices. However, if there'd been a strong head wind, we'd have had more wind noise. The car has had all holes plugged in the firewall, all new seals, and a few tricks of my own, i.e. rear quarter windows locked and sealed in place. Still, at 70 MPH the car is drafty. But the OEM heater, combined with the heater in the AC evaporator, will make anyone sweat, even at single digits outside.

                Lately there's a squeak somewhere in the rear, noticeable only at walking speed. Likely the bushings between the rear spring leafs. Gonna hafta fix that someday. There's always something that needs attention. Old Studebakers are like old Harleys of the same era, ride awhile then work awhile. LOL

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                • #23
                  My 1950 restored Champion is quiet except for the exhaust drone from the turbo muffler the previous owner had installed. The tail pipe even has the exhaust deflector to make sure the exhaust is beyond the bumper and pointed somewhat downward. I already bought a new stock muffler, and can't wait to get it installed.
                  In high school I owned a 1955 Bel Air 4 door sedan. I brushed roofing tar on the floor, then layed down 2 layers of tar paper, then jute padding and new carpet. That car was quieter than a new Cadillac, and there was no smell of the tar or tar paper. The car had the new car smell due to the new carpet and new vinyl seat covers.

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                  • #24
                    Just wait a couple of years, and when the hearing begins to go, problem solved.

                    Seriously, tires and shock absorbers can be the source of a huge amount of vibration noise. The vibration will be transferred throughout the body, to become annoying rattles. A tire out of balance, or defective shock is sure to become an issue at road speed. I always suggest rotating your tires, or temporarily substituting another good set for a trial run.

                    Bill

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                    • #25
                      Well, you could do any, or all of the above, as helpfully suggested, spend lots of money, but the results are going to be the same. It will never be as quiet as your wife would like it. A hard top (and a convertible) are the worst noise maker type cars ever built. Unlike modern cars, these old beasts just weren't made with the type of precision and fit that will allow for a quiet ride, no matter what you do.

                      That said, the only way your going to achieve your goal for quietness, is to sell me the car. I assure you that you, being in Alabama, will hear nothing but quiet from both the car and the wife. For the rest of your life, of the former, probably not so much the later, though.........

                      Please, enjoy the thought, if not the content. Remember, don't judge to critically, you never know when Karma will come back around and bite you.

                      Enjoy the car and the holidays....

                      Bo
                      Bo

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                      • #26
                        Scads of good advice on quieting down our Stude's. if you havent insulated/sound deadened that humongus hood i would go there next. years ago when gutting a 56 Pelham wagon project i discovered the factory firewall insulation to be a tar impregnated piece of rock wool behind the card stock firewall liner. it was about 1in thick in the center and tapered to a thin edge on the ends. very impressive,the 185 was quiet until it swarmed. i like Black Jack roofing mastic troweled on about 1/2 thick, the whole floor and firewall gets this and it helps.My 53 coupe hot rod has a 224 with 3in side pipes and 18 in glass packs and is quieter than any of our other Studes, including a 57 silver hawk and a 62 lark Hardtop. work on that hood! Luck Doofus

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Hallabutt View Post
                          Just wait a couple of years, and when the hearing begins to go, problem solved.

                          Seriously, tires and shock absorbers can be the source of a huge amount of vibration noise. The vibration will be transferred throughout the body, to become annoying rattles. A tire out of balance, or defective shock is sure to become an issue at road speed. I always suggest rotating your tires, or temporarily substituting another good set for a trial run.

                          Bill
                          Add to the above universals that need to be replaced..........talk about vibration!!!:-(

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                          • #28
                            One other thing to look at, the steering column seal. it's probably hard as a rock. I add a pad of jute carpet insulation between the seal and the firewall. I spray this with rubberized undercoating, and make it slightly larger than the seal. But that hood first! Luck Doofus

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