Announcement

Collapse

Get more Tips, Specs and Technical Data!

Did you know... this Forum is a service of the Studebaker Drivers Club? For more technical tips, specifications, history and tech data, visit the Tech Tips page at the SDC Homepage: www.studebakerdriversclub.com/tips.asp
See more
See less

How can I get my 64 GT quieter?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Body: How can I get my 64 GT quieter?

    My 64 GT is like riding in a B17 Flying Fortress! I installed a new exhaust system, tar deadining sheets and thick jute underneath the carpet and it still just roars down the road. I know these are 60 plus year old designs, but I can't belive this car was that loud when it left the factory. My wife hates riding in it because she's so spoiled with the quietness of modern cars. Any tips to quiet down the interior noise would be appreciated!
    Last edited by jostanton1; 11-26-2019, 11:47 AM.

  • #2
    Viscous fan drive
    64 GT Hawk (K7)
    1970 Avanti (R3)

    Comment


    • #3
      Check inside the Doors when New they WERE coated with Tar Undercoating but New replacement Doors did not have that.
      That will get rid of any "Tinnyness" sounds but not road noise, for that you need to add Insulation Sheets.

      Insulate the Trunk to passenger compartment wall, that helps with the noise from the exhaust tips.

      Maybe you need Quiet Tone, wide oval, stock type Mufflers?

      Switch from a fixed Engine Cooling Fan to a Viscous Drive type.

      Check the Headpipe to Exhaust Manifold flanges, Gaskets and Heat Riser for leaks.

      Seal any air leaking Wiring, Cable etc. Grommets on the firewall.

      What about the Rear Axle Ratio? Have you checked for a good High one, like 3.07 or 3.31 for Automatic or Manual, or 3.54, 3.73 for Overdrive?

      I don't think it will ever match a Lexus!
      Last edited by StudeRich; 11-26-2019, 06:54 PM.
      StudeRich
      Second Generation Stude Driver,
      Proud '54 Starliner Owner

      Comment


      • #4
        I do have the viscous fan and the doors are original. I'll work on the trunk compartment wall.

        Comment


        • #5
          What is your tach reading at highway speeds? Are you talking about engine noise or wind noise? Radial tires are quieter if you haven't changed over but like Rich says they won't compare with modern cars no matter what you do.

          Comment


          • #6
            For exhaust noise, take it to a Payless Muffler Shop and tell them you want quiet mufflers installed. Have a seat in the lobby, and they will come and get you when they are finished, probably less than an hour.

            For fan roar and motor sounding like an airplane, if your car does not have overdrive, install a 3.07 rear end.

            Comment


            • #7
              How is the weather stripping and windlace ? Window channels ? Are exhaust pipes touching anything ? Are the tailpipe tips lower than the rear bumper ? and all the above , Ed

              Comment


              • #8
                If you could better describe the type of noise (whirr, rattle, squeak, roar, etc.) and the area that it emanates from, it would help with possible solutions (other than all of the above).

                I have owned and ridden in '64 Hawks that were quite quiet (for a 1960s car), but not like a modern luxury car.

                EDIT: I have been in a B-17, but I have never ridden in one, so I do not know what that sound is.
                Last edited by studegary; 11-26-2019, 07:16 PM.
                Gary L.
                Wappinger, NY

                SDC member since 1968
                Studebaker enthusiast much longer

                Comment


                • #9
                  Coker tires by chance?
                  '64 R2 back on da road again

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Also..
                    Extend your tail pipe tips past the back bumper.
                    HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                    Jeff


                    Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      My 64 GT is like riding in a B17 Flying Fortress!
                      X3, that doesn't tell us anything other than you think it's loud. Is the noise engine RPM, exhaust, vibration, does it change when you shift into neutral at road speed?

                      The Studebaker firewall is like Swiss cheese. It's full of holes. Pull up the front carpet and spend some time making rubber gaskets to go around the throttle, clutch, brake, speedometer cable, emergency cable, steering column. Then put Dynamat over the entire floor and up the sides of the kick panels.

                      Check the center carrier bearing. I've ridden in Studes where the owner seemed not to hear the noise coming up through the floor from the carrier bearing insulators being gone.

                      jack vines
                      PackardV8

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I used dynamat sound reducer on my Hawk. It seems to work well, but I installed it while the car was under restoration, so I was able to cover the floor pan and fire wall, some inside doors, bulkhead between trunk,and most of the area under the headliner. This would not be practical on a completed car, but could be used on the areas that you can access. Good Luck with it!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by tsenecal View Post
                          I used dynamat sound reducer on my Hawk. It seems to work well, but I installed it while the car was under restoration, so I was able to cover the floor pan and fire wall, some inside doors, bulkhead between trunk,and most of the area under the headliner. This would not be practical on a completed car, but could be used on the areas that you can access. Good Luck with it!
                          Dynamat becomes soaked, if ever caught in prolonged heavy rain, and will need a dehumidifier sitting on the front seat for a week to dry it out. Truck bed liner is a much better alternative, and and be placed anywhere matting can. I like Rhino-Liner.

                          Dynamite is old technology, and does a poor job at noise and temp control. But if matting is preferred, there is much better stuff available nowadays, albeit more expensive. Dynamat has became dirt cheap, comparatively speaking, but you get what you pay for.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I had and still have the same complaint on my '62 Hawk. I have changed the tires (helped some), put in noise damping on the floors/firewall/doors and the area between back seat and trunk. The car is absolutely noisy and not fun to drive; it is one rattle machine. All rubber is; new maybe it is time to dump it. I owned a '53 c/k, 65 ht, and 62 wagon and they were fine vehicles. What more could be done...undercoating maybe? Chet

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I agree with Joe Hall. When we started our restoration on the 64 GT I chose to go with a spray bed liner on the inside and out of the car "tub" as well as inside all the fenders. It is amazing how quiet the car has become as well as insulating. Also as Packard V8 stated you need to create your own gaskets for the holes on the cowl area. Roofing rubber comes in various thickness and is cheap. Weatherseals around hood, trunk, doors and windows may also need to be replaced.
                              It is an addiction!

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X