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232 Stude diesel?

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  • Engine: 232 Stude diesel?

    Given the sturdiness of the V8 engines, I wonder if one could be engineered into a diesel? Of course engineering new heads, rods, and pistons would have to be made. But I'm thinking the 232 block would be a good start cuz it has the most "meat" to handle the extra forces involved. What yda thunk?

  • #2
    Doubt it.
    The main webs aren't nearly stout enough, the cylinder bore's aren't thick enough. The deck "maybe" as long as it's never been cut.

    Rods and pistons are plenty available and could be designed with the proper strength. Who is going to do your heads? We can't even get a good modern performance head designed and built.

    In reality, the only place the Stude block is "sturdy" would be in a twisting moment or longitudinal bending moment. Unfortunately all that metal for that strength doesn't do much for high horse power strength.

    Mike

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    • #3
      The 232" block with a 224" crank would be 201" and the strongest combination of OEM parts. It is at least as strong as the GM Olds conversion diesel. Some people loved them and some had nothing but problems.

      jack vines
      PackardV8

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      • #4
        Using a gasoline engine and re-egineering it into a diesel did not work all that well for Oldsmobile!
        Frank van Doorn
        Omaha, Ne.
        1962 GT Hawk 289 4 speed
        1941 Champion streetrod, R-2 Powered, GM 200-4R trans.
        1952 V-8 232 Commander State "Starliner" hardtop OD

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        • #5
          I'd suggest using a diesel that is already a diesel. I used the Mercedes 300 Turbo diesel in my CE IE. You can buy a good used engine for a lot less than starting from scratch with all the components built for it. Believe me just adapting all the stuff to the old stude was job enough without engineering a motor from a 70 year old engine.
          Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by t walgamuth View Post
            I used the Mercedes 300 Turbo diesel in my CE IE.
            But then there are those who might question the logic of swapping in a last-century diesel design. There are many more modern, lighter, more efficient diesels from which to choose.

            jack vines
            PackardV8

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            • #7
              Check out the new cummins 2.8 liter. Many people using it now for conversions.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post

                But then there are those who might question the logic of swapping in a last-century diesel design. There are many more modern, lighter, more efficient diesels from which to choose.

                jack vines
                Sure. My 300d though is simple and durable. Once it is set up correctly it can be driven for decades without major costs. The performance is good too. And I have had fifteen or so of them and know them inside out.

                All that said an aluminum LS motor does have its attraction.
                Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by t walgamuth View Post
                  Sure. My 300d though is simple and durable. . . . . All that said an aluminum LS motor does have its attraction.
                  You understand the comment on an obsolete diesel came from the guy who built an obsolete Packard V8 for his Studebaker truck. Agree, an aluminum LS is the most modern, most compact, efficient, most widely supported engine one could choose for a swap. However, logic would say one can buy the aluminum LS and in the Corvette it came for less that it costs to build a good Studebaker street rod. None of the above, nor is logic among the reasons we mess with the weird combinations of obsolete stuff. It is what it is.

                  jack vines


                  PackardV8

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                  • #10
                    That is for sure! (I was not in the least bit offended).
                    Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

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                    • #11
                      'course I already have the street rod done, so the ls would just be a motor and transmission swap. It already has the ford 9" and 12" ventilated discs all around.
                      Diesel loving, autocrossing, Coupe express loving, Grandpa Architect.

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