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1954 Hood Hinge Assembly

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  • Body: 1954 Hood Hinge Assembly

    I have a 54 Studebaker which was disassembled to have the body E-Coated. There are (2) arms on the hood hinge assembly half which is mounted to the body. These arms have about a 1" gap between them. But, there is only (1) short stud on the hood part of the hinge assembly.

    My question is can someone post a close up picture of how and where the arms get attached?

    Thanks in advance....grr

  • #2
    I found it - There are holes where the studs used to be. The guy who took it apart must have knocked them out, or something...

    grr

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    • #3
      This is where the hinge mounts on the hood. The studs are tack welded to the inside of the corner reinforcement. When I removed my hood I found two of the studs missing, their tack weld had broken and they had fallen into the hood. I was able to fish them back into place with a magnet but the only way to reattach them to the hood was to cut access in order to reweld them to the inside. This pic is after the repair.

      These are the studs, they have three locating spots which index into mating dents on the inside of the hood around the hole they protrude through, they were then tack welded in place. The access hole I cut to get inside in order to reweld the stud.

      After welding.



      The only problem I found was that even if the studs were welded back in place with the spots and the original tack weld indexing them prefectly to where they had been before breaking loose; when reassembled to the hinge they are not EXACTLY where they should be and caused the hinges to bind. I can only assume the studs were never exactly where they should have been which is probably why they had broken loose to begin with. To alleviate the hinge bind, I elongated the holes in the ends of the hinge arms longitudinally with the hinge arm. This allows the two arms of each hinge to move slightly different distances from one another without over loading the studs when not aligned perfectly. A bonus to this is the hood is allowed to be lifted about 9" higher than before elongating the holes. By the way, before removing the hood and finding that two of the studs (one on each side) were broken loose and "floating" the hood would open 11" higher than the prop rod.

      sigpic

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