Announcement

Collapse

Get more Tips, Specs and Technical Data!

Did you know... this Forum is a service of the Studebaker Drivers Club? For more technical tips, specifications, history and tech data, visit the Tech Tips page at the SDC Homepage: www.studebakerdriversclub.com/tips.asp
See more
See less

ignition timing R2

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Ignition: ignition timing R2

    Can anyone suggest ignition timing settings for a 64 Avanti R-2? I have mine set at 28 degrees advance at 1600 rpm (4 degrees more than shop manual) and I'm not all that happy with the idle, which is a little rough. I'm getting 15 inches steady vacuum at idle 600 rpm (distributor vacuum hose plugged), I'm sure there are no vacuum leaks. The vacuum reading seems low to me, I was expecting 17-20 inches. The engine has had a total rebuild including rings, valves, etc etc. Any suggestions are much appreciated. Thanks! Lance

  • #2
    Have the valves been adjusted again? Did the builder use an R 2 + cam, more lift,lumpier idle hence lower vacuum at idle. Lou Cote

    Comment


    • #3
      Have you checked the Centrifugal Distributor Weights and their mounting "Pins" for excessive wear?

      I believe the idle speed should be a bit higher with the Performance Camshaft, especially if it is a R2+ re-grind.
      Resetting the Carb. idle richness could also help.
      StudeRich
      Second Generation Stude Driver,
      Proud '54 Starliner Owner

      Comment


      • #4
        I agree with Rich, If you are using a Prestolite distributor and it hasn't been rebuilt and then tested on a distributor machine., that could be your problem. Also, there are differences in advance rates and the amount of advance between the distributors used in Studebaker V8 engines. If you are using a distributor such as a Delco window distributor, there will be way too much centrifugal advance built into it for use in an R2 engine. Be sure you are using the correct distributor for your engine. Bud

        Comment


        • #5
          I know nothing . . . but, for what it is worth . . . in a post where someone was outlining what he found to work best in many years of Stude racing, he recommended advancing timing more than factory specs suggested. I think he was talking about 35 degrees of advance.

          It was on the internet, so it must be true, eh? But he may not have been concerned about the idle, and your Stude R2 may have different components that require different timing . . . so take it with many grains of salt.

          Comment


          • #6
            ALL...
            At idle, the mechanical advance is doing "nothing"...it's just sitting there waiting for some rpm to start working. And the way most seem to set them up, the weights still...don't start moving until 1500 or 1800 rpm..!

            So NO...no need to be concerned the mechanical advance at idle.

            As far as a rough running engine at 1600rpm...again, at a steady state speed, the weight springs will hold onto the distributor shaft hard enough that if the pins are loose, still nothing is going to happen. Beside, I'm "sure" Lance would have seen the timing mark move as he was watching it on the damper ring...and would have asked, "why is the timing mark moving while I'm setting the timing?".

            1. I have seen bad distributor shaft bushings that allow the timing to fluctuate in small amounts at all speeds.

            2. Another vote for incorrect valve adjustment. Things move around during the initial run-in of a new engine. Best to double check, adjust them .001" or .002" on the loose side for now. I even set my exhaust to .002" loose for most of the 93,000 miles that I put on the 259 in my Lark wagon. The engine just seemed to like it better.

            3. And yes again, the factory recommends a very low timing value. As noted above, I'd start at 34° total, and go up from there after testing for detonation.

            4. What is the method of spark..? Points, electronic ? If points, the same goes as for the valves, the rubbing block will wear quickly on a new set of points, especially if not lubed. Check the point gap.

            Mike

            Comment


            • #7
              IF you still have the original Dual Points Prestolite Distributor, it is still possible, maybe not highly likely as Jeff said, for the Centrifugal Weights to be Jammed outward at idle, but with weak or broken springs or serious wear that does happen.
              StudeRich
              Second Generation Stude Driver,
              Proud '54 Starliner Owner

              Comment

              Working...
              X