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Drum to Disc system switch - 60's cars

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  • Drum to Disc system switch - 60's cars

    What parts are needed from a donor car (66 Cruiser) to convert another similar Studebaker's front brakes to the disc brake system?
    Mainly, are the hubs different from the drum hubs? Any other not so obvious parts?
    I had someone inquire about purchasing the disc setup and need to know what parts I will need to include if the deal goes through.
    Thanks

  • #2
    I would think out long and hard about transplanting stock disc brakes and think about investing in a Turner brake setup.
    Why?
    Unless everything has been refurbished on the stock disc setup, you can expect to rebuild or replace both the calipers, and the rotors.
    Replacing the wheel bearings and seals is good maintenance, too.
    I would suggest pricing all those stock items out and then price a bracket kit from Turner Brakes and then price the calipers and rotors from your flaps.
    Not poo-poo'ing the disc swap idea at all...
    Just stressing doing your homework.
    Jeff[8D]


    quote:Originally posted by 5brown1

    What parts are needed from a donor car (66 Cruiser) to convert another similar Studebaker's front brakes to the disc brake system?
    Mainly, are the hubs different from the drum hubs? Any other not so obvious parts?
    I had someone inquire about purchasing the disc setup and need to know what parts I will need to include if the deal goes through.
    Thanks
    http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock
    HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

    Jeff


    Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

    Comment


    • #3
      You'll need the rear brakes - every bit of them. They're unique to the disc brake option. You'll need the booster/master cyl. unit and of course, the brake parts at the front wheels. The front spindles are unique as well and the wheels on disc brake cars are different too!

      1957 Transtar 1/2ton
      1963 Cruiser
      1960 Larkvertible V8
      1958 Provincial wagon
      1953 Commander coupe
      1957 President two door

      No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

      Comment


      • #4
        Has anybody here found a ford or dodge disc brake hub that fits the studebaker spindle? I heard mention of using different bearings to make them fit. I'm sure I could fab up some caliper brackets out of mild steel once I found the compatible parts. Joint venture anyone?

        Comment


        • #5
          It's already been done a few times by several different people...


          quote:Originally posted by buddymander

          Has anybody here found a ford or dodge disc brake hub that fits the studebaker spindle? I heard mention of using different bearings to make them fit. I'm sure I could fab up some caliper brackets out of mild steel once I found the compatible parts. Joint venture anyone?
          HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

          Jeff


          Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



          Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

          Comment


          • #6
            if you want to use a slip on type rotor, easiest place to start would be your stock drum brake hubs. If your drums are still good, ask around, someone probably has some loose hubs and/or hubs with worn out drums attached. You'll need new studs to do this however.

            Search here for threads by tom "sbca96" about his Cobra brake conversion, that sounds a little like what you are envisioning, or you might get some ideas for a "roll your own" conversion if you don't want to buy his brackets.

            Alternately, Turner's is a one piece rotor/hub that works well...

            word of warning, neither conversion will fit *stock* 15" wheels, although Turners will fit Ford/Chrysler wheels I believe. Depending on which of Tom's setups you were to go with they may or may not fit.

            nate

            --
            55 Commander Starlight
            http://members.cox.net/njnagel
            --
            55 Commander Starlight
            http://members.cox.net/njnagel

            Comment


            • #7
              But I thought the original hub would make the rotor stick out too far since the original stude rotor fits to the inside of the hub, right? I'm only looking for ten inch rotors or so. I want disc because they self adjust better and aren't affected by water. My first thought was to cut off the aframes and weld on ball joint ends using a different spindle.

              Comment


              • #8
                Your average rotor is about a 1/4 thick at the hub. Not a serious
                issue unless you go to a certain width rim or offset. All these are
                correctable with research. The wheels I am running on my Avanti are
                17 x 8, no issues with fender clearance. As a matter of fact I put
                a .10 spacer to help clear the upper front zerk fitting on full lock.

                Also keep in mind the drum sits on the hub face, moving the wheel
                out roughly 1/8 inch. In comparison the Disc brake cars have their
                wheels inboard more than the drum cars.

                Yes 15 inch wheels work with the GT Mustang 11" brakes. I reposted
                the thread since the old one was locked and archived and my picture
                locations all changed from AOL dropping their FTP.

                Tom
                '63 Avanti R1, '03 Mustang Cobra 13" front disc/98 GT rear brakes, 03 Cobra 17" wheels, GM alt, 97 Z28 leather seats, TKO 5-spd, Ported heads w/SST full flow valves.
                Check out my disc brake adapters to install 1994-2004 Mustang disc brakes on your Studebaker!!
                http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...bracket-update
                I have also written many TECH how to articles, do a search for my Forum name to find them

                Comment


                • #9
                  Those Avantis look like they have a lot more tire room than the Hawk. That Mustang stuff is still pretty new. I was hoping for some older stuff, like dodge truck with the 5 on 4.5. I think I'll check out those common GM front wheel drive rotors and calipers. Those are extremely common and I think some have the Studebaker bolt pattern. But the idea of mating a different spindle to the Stude aframes and using the upper aframe shafts to align using slots in the frame is still gnawing at me.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I guess the big question then is what's wrong with using Turner's system?

                    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                    Tom - Mulberry, FL

                    1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2125.60)

                    Tom - Bradenton, FL

                    1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2514.10)
                    1964 Studebaker Commander - 170 1V, 3-Speed w/OD

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Cost. And for me, it's overkill.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        70-71 Dodge Charger rotors will fit with just a change of the inner bearing and the grease seal. Plus you have to make your own caliper mounting bracket and spacers. Or you could use the Wilwood brake set up for the Dodge but then you are back up to the expense of the Steel Tec brakes.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          quote:Originally posted by buddymander

                          Cost. And for me, it's overkill.
                          There is no such thing as overkill in a brake system. As for the cost, I guess I look at it as time is money. For $230 you get the brackets & adapters. Heck, you can't get a complete brake job for that. How long will it take to build a better mousetrap? I'll stop because I really am not looking to offend anyone, but for the money, I don't think you can beat it.

                          ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                          Tom - Mulberry, FL

                          1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2125.60)

                          Tom - Bradenton, FL

                          1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2514.10)
                          1964 Studebaker Commander - 170 1V, 3-Speed w/OD

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Did they only make that for the two years? i'd like something from the late seventies or eighties for the sake of availability. Early nineties would probably be best. Maybe a crown vick.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              There's the added cost of the late model mustang rotors and calipers, right? I can't get that stuff cheap from the junkyard. It's not even IN the junkyards that I go to. So; the total is far more than $230. I can hit Pick-Your-Part on a half price day and come out of there with EVERYTHING for under $100. I think the original Studebaker discs were probably up to snuff, it's just that there aren't enough to go around. The brakes are the last thing I need to upgrade in my GT. I've already installed the mitsubishi power box and the 1 1/4 sway bar, installed shortened Z28 coils and shortened the steering arms and I'm totally satisfied with the way it handles. I'm almost ready to find a spindle that matches the stude tie rod end and start chopping off aframes and welding on ball joint mounts.

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