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Carter AS vs RBS on 170 ci

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  • Fuel System: Carter AS vs RBS on 170 ci

    When looking at the carburetors used on the 6 cylinder OHV engine I notice that in 1964 Studebaker changed from the AS to the RBS on the Champ trucks. What are the pros and cons of using one versus the other on a 62 engine?
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  • #2
    I think most folks here regard the RBS carb as cheap junk.
    Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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    • #3
      This folk here knows da RBS is junk. If you're handed a brand new one, run fast to da nearest dumpster and body slam it into da bottom. That's after you've over it with your Cat D10 dozer of course.
      Kim

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      • #4
        I have never been able to figure it out: I have one RBS on a Lark that was slapped together with a cheap kit and has worked perfectly for over 20 years and more than 30K miles and delivers 20+ mpg in a very heavy convertible. Others I have tried to rebuild with painstaking care and great attention to detail and they are useless. Use the AS.

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        • #5
          FWIW, my RBS performs satisfactorily on my 63.
          Of course, I rebuilt it completely after taking the time to understand how it works. The shop manual explains this thoroughly.
          IMHO, this carb is simply misunderstood and I'd be glad to find a new one.
          Nice day to all.
          sigpic

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          • #6
            Kind of like Ross, I had a decently performing RBS that was starting to get tired. The throttle shaft was tight, so I got a zip kit so I could clean it up and refresh the needle and accelerator pump. It was a basic clean up and adjust but it never worked well again. I sent it out for rebuild by Daytona Carbs, it still did not work well. I tried a junky looking one I had on my shelf, and it worked OK. I did nothing but last it with carb cleaner, and it stopped working.
            I swapped to an AS and all was well, plus, it seems that the mixture at wider throttle openings was better..or at least it felt smoother and stronger.
            Ron Dame
            '63 Champ

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            • #7
              How about using one of the Carters that came on the earlier flat head engines? They seem to be fine. I know nothing about overhead Studebaker sixes.
              RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

              17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
              10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
              10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
              4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
              5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
              56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
              60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Ron Dame View Post
                Kind of like Ross, I had a decently performing RBS that was starting to get tired. The throttle shaft was tight, so I got a zip kit so I could clean it up and refresh the needle and accelerator pump. It was a basic clean up and adjust but it never worked well again. I sent it out for rebuild by Daytona Carbs, it still did not work well. I tried a junky looking one I had on my shelf, and it worked OK. I did nothing but last it with carb cleaner, and it stopped working.
                I swapped to an AS and all was well, plus, it seems that the mixture at wider throttle openings was better..or at least it felt smoother and stronger.
                I found that several parts on the RBS could need special attention.
                The pump jet has a very tiny passage that can get easily clogged.
                If the step-up rod diaphragm gets bad or that it's cover is not airtight, you no longer get extra fuel under heavy loads. You can check this by applying slight vacuum with a hose and your mouth in the hole located at the base of the carb. With the fuel bowl removed, you should see the step-up moving accordingly.
                The choke housing can get loose. It is sometimes necessary to drill a hole on the outside fixation and use a little nut and bolt to tighten it against the carb housing.
                Of course, all the settings are to be made as indicated in the shop manual.
                There is a guy on this forum who put almost 300 000 miles on his 63S. He said that he got better mileage with RBS but that the performance was better with the AS.
                Nice day to all.
                sigpic

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