Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

old gas

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Jeff_H
    replied
    Around '93 or '94 I attended a farm/estate auction. On the auction was a 1950 Desoto "Carry-All". I guess a fairly rare car. It had been sold new in my hometown in rural MN and was in decent original shape. Early 70's plates on it. They had put a new battery in it and started/ran it to demo before the bidding started. Oh my did that 20yr old gas stink!!! But, the flathead 6 ran on it just fine.

    Few years ago, I tried to get the portable generator on the farm running and it would not fire a shot. The gas was maybe 2yrs old and I'd put stabel in it. It was not E10 either. After draining that out and fresh gas, started right up.

    I need to drive about 25miles to get 100% gas in the area of rural Minnesota where the farm is and there is only 1 station I know of with a "red" pump that is intended for off road equipment (usually boats, etc). So, normally, I bring non-E gas from home (Fargo area) for use in the mowers, etc at the farm as that can end up setting around for months. I've had poor luck using E10 (fresh) in things like chainsaws and weed-whackers. Seems they just won't start/run very well if at all.

    Leave a comment:


  • Skip Lackie
    replied
    Originally posted by GrumpyOne View Post


    Well, I live in the Austin metro area so I think that you can guess as to why none of that good ol' stuff is available here...
    Don't wish to engage in a political debate, but local governments usually don't get to have any say in what kind of gasoline is sold there. According to the EPA: "Almost all of the gasoline supplied in the U.S. today contains 10 percent ethanol."

    Ethanol is being added to gas in the US because the Congress required it. So eliminating it will require electing different people to represent us.

    Leave a comment:


  • Jeffry Cassel
    replied
    Grumpy: Ah, yes, Austin, The home of the University where thinking is banned.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mrs K Corbin
    replied
    I Get my Non-Ethanol from the Farmer's Coop. I refuse to use anything else in a lawnmower, weed whacker, or Studebaker.

    Leave a comment:


  • GrumpyOne
    replied
    Originally posted by TWChamp View Post

    That really surprises me, as Texas is the land of oil. I've heard of guys adding a quart of diesel to a tank of corn gas, and they report good results.
    I haven't tried it yet, but will if I'm on a trip and can't find the good gas.
    I wonder if the diesel will extend the fuel shelf life to more than the usual couple months for corn gas?

    Well, I live in the Austin metro area so I think that you can guess as to why none of that good ol' stuff is available here...

    Leave a comment:


  • GrumpyOne
    replied
    Originally posted by rbisacca View Post

    If you want it bad enough: Lakeway Marina, 103 A Lakeway Dr. Must bring can. Pumps on dock.
    Naw... I'll just chug on with corncrap...

    Leave a comment:


  • Jeffry Cassel
    replied
    This tractor and most prewar tractors were made to run on tractor fuel. It was low octane distillate that you put in the main tank. There was also a small gasolene tank that you would switch to to start the engine. When it reached operating temperature, you would switch over to tractor fuel in the main fuel tank.

    Leave a comment:


  • Steve Winzar
    replied
    Deepnhock raised some pertinent views way back on page on of this topic. Older cars are not well designed for alcohol fuels but they can run on it if need be. There is an awful lot of bad press put out there by oil companies and their supporters. I am not going to try cramming the alcohol argument down anybody's throat, but come a day when petroleum fuel becomes just plain too rare- Alcohol can be an alternative. Please DO view this documentary http://bit.ly/2QeXSHu (circa 2015)- it's really good (albeit longish)and will make you think. It also puts forward a lot of plain good sense for alternate fuels and the highly politicised standpoint of the petroleum industry.

    Leave a comment:


  • Frank DuVal
    replied
    The EPA still monitors air quality nationwide and determines which regions (counties, cities) must sell only oxygenated fuels. The EPA doesn't have its own police, so enforcement is left up to the states and cities. Nearly all big cities in North America are still in non-compliance with the air quality standards, and many suburban areas flunk as well. But most rural areas have clean air, so ironically, the areas that make the stuff don't have to use it.
    And that's why I cannot buy non-ethanol in my county, or any counties in northern Virginia. But, drive south across the river and it is available in several stations. Just too much traffic on I-95 to ever get good emission rating from the EPA test. Yes, we also have to have our cars emission tested to get tags if under 25 years of age.

    I've had gasoline go bad since I was a boy and had to get dad to rebuild a carburetor on a lawn mower that was given to me. Float bowl coated with shellac from gasoline drying up. And then there is the valve sticking issue with old gasoline. That sticky gasoline flows through the fuel system and deposits on the intake valve, sticking it in the guide. I have fixed many of these engines over the years in lawn equipment, cars, trucks..... What do you mean non-ethanol gasoline never went bad?????????????

    Leave a comment:


  • TWChamp
    replied
    Originally posted by GrumpyOne View Post

    Evidently... Can't find any non-corn gas here in the Austin area of Texas.
    That really surprises me, as Texas is the land of oil. I've heard of guys adding a quart of diesel to a tank of corn gas, and they report good results.
    I haven't tried it yet, but will if I'm on a trip and can't find the good gas.
    I wonder if the diesel will extend the fuel shelf life to more than the usual couple months for corn gas?

    Leave a comment:


  • rbisacca
    replied
    Originally posted by GrumpyOne View Post

    Evidently... Can't find any non-corn gas here in the Austin area of Texas.
    If you want it bad enough: Lakeway Marina, 103 A Lakeway Dr. Must bring can. Pumps on dock.

    Leave a comment:


  • GrumpyOne
    replied
    Originally posted by RadioRoy View Post
    This is puzzling to me. Does it seem like all the non-alcohol gas is only available in the heartland? That's the same place where the corn grows. Is there something about local lobbyist groups pressuring the law makers?
    Evidently... Can't find any non-corn gas here in the Austin area of Texas.

    Leave a comment:


  • Skip Lackie
    replied
    Originally posted by GTHawk View Post

    They do make rules.
    Agreed -- but only within the limits allowed by federal law. And as some politicians have stated: "Elections have consequences". So different administrations will pull them one way or the other.

    Leave a comment:


  • swvalcon
    replied
    I thought those old John Deere's would run on almost anything.

    Leave a comment:


  • bensherb
    replied
    Originally posted by RadioRoy View Post
    Alcohol gas is over $4 for regular here in the San Francisco Bay Area. It's been that price for months.

    But there is no snow here, either.
    Same here in Tracy, I have to add fourty or fifty cents a gallon to that when I'm in Goleta.

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X