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old gas

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  • #31
    Checked price today at local Chevron station. 87 octane regular $2.419/gal. 87 octane non-ethanol (marine gas) $3.799/gal. $1.38 higher!!!!!!!!!

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Skip Lackie View Post

      You're welcome -- best I could do from memory.

      I know we all love to hate the EPA -- but they are largely blameless for the ethanol-gas debacle -- equivalent to a cop having to enforce a badly written law.
      They do make rules.

      don

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      • #33
        Alcohol gas is over $4 for regular here in the San Francisco Bay Area. It's been that price for months.

        But there is no snow here, either.
        RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

        17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
        10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
        10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
        4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
        5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
        56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
        60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

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        • #34
          Originally posted by RadioRoy View Post
          Alcohol gas is over $4 for regular here in the San Francisco Bay Area. It's been that price for months.

          But there is no snow here, either.
          Same here in Tracy, I have to add fourty or fifty cents a gallon to that when I'm in Goleta.
          sigpic

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          • #35
            I thought those old John Deere's would run on almost anything.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by GTHawk View Post

              They do make rules.
              Agreed -- but only within the limits allowed by federal law. And as some politicians have stated: "Elections have consequences". So different administrations will pull them one way or the other.
              Skip Lackie

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              • #37
                Originally posted by RadioRoy View Post
                This is puzzling to me. Does it seem like all the non-alcohol gas is only available in the heartland? That's the same place where the corn grows. Is there something about local lobbyist groups pressuring the law makers?
                Evidently... Can't find any non-corn gas here in the Austin area of Texas.

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by GrumpyOne View Post

                  Evidently... Can't find any non-corn gas here in the Austin area of Texas.
                  If you want it bad enough: Lakeway Marina, 103 A Lakeway Dr. Must bring can. Pumps on dock.

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by GrumpyOne View Post

                    Evidently... Can't find any non-corn gas here in the Austin area of Texas.
                    That really surprises me, as Texas is the land of oil. I've heard of guys adding a quart of diesel to a tank of corn gas, and they report good results.
                    I haven't tried it yet, but will if I'm on a trip and can't find the good gas.
                    I wonder if the diesel will extend the fuel shelf life to more than the usual couple months for corn gas?

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                    • #40
                      The EPA still monitors air quality nationwide and determines which regions (counties, cities) must sell only oxygenated fuels. The EPA doesn't have its own police, so enforcement is left up to the states and cities. Nearly all big cities in North America are still in non-compliance with the air quality standards, and many suburban areas flunk as well. But most rural areas have clean air, so ironically, the areas that make the stuff don't have to use it.
                      And that's why I cannot buy non-ethanol in my county, or any counties in northern Virginia. But, drive south across the river and it is available in several stations. Just too much traffic on I-95 to ever get good emission rating from the EPA test. Yes, we also have to have our cars emission tested to get tags if under 25 years of age.

                      I've had gasoline go bad since I was a boy and had to get dad to rebuild a carburetor on a lawn mower that was given to me. Float bowl coated with shellac from gasoline drying up. And then there is the valve sticking issue with old gasoline. That sticky gasoline flows through the fuel system and deposits on the intake valve, sticking it in the guide. I have fixed many of these engines over the years in lawn equipment, cars, trucks..... What do you mean non-ethanol gasoline never went bad?????????????
                      Frank DuVal

                      50 Commander 4 door

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                      • #41
                        Deepnhock raised some pertinent views way back on page on of this topic. Older cars are not well designed for alcohol fuels but they can run on it if need be. There is an awful lot of bad press put out there by oil companies and their supporters. I am not going to try cramming the alcohol argument down anybody's throat, but come a day when petroleum fuel becomes just plain too rare- Alcohol can be an alternative. Please DO view this documentary http://bit.ly/2QeXSHu (circa 2015)- it's really good (albeit longish)and will make you think. It also puts forward a lot of plain good sense for alternate fuels and the highly politicised standpoint of the petroleum industry.

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                        • #42
                          This tractor and most prewar tractors were made to run on tractor fuel. It was low octane distillate that you put in the main tank. There was also a small gasolene tank that you would switch to to start the engine. When it reached operating temperature, you would switch over to tractor fuel in the main fuel tank.

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