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Did all 259"s come with straight wall wrist pins? Did all 289"s come with tapered wall wrist pins?

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  • Engine: Did all 259"s come with straight wall wrist pins? Did all 289"s come with tapered wall wrist pins?

    When several engines are going together at once, it's necessary to examine each part to insure the right stuff stays together.

    Both the OEM 259" pistons and the Egge Machine replacements have barrel skirts and straight wall wrist pins. The 289"s always seem to have slipper skirts and tapered wall wrist pins.

    Here's the unexpected data point; the straight wall wrist pins are slightly lighter in weight than the tapered pins. At a glance, everyone chooses the straight wall pin as heavier than the tapered, but the scale doesn't agree.

    Since the cylinder diameters are the same, since both the 259" and the 289" engines were built on the same assembly line from 1956-1964, why did Studebaker choose to stock two different wrist pins and two different skirt designs?

    jack vines

    PackardV8

  • #2
    I've wondered about the different piston skirts and wrist pins for as long as I've been building Studebaker engines. I hope someone chimes in with a reasonable answer. Bud

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    • #3
      Ross gave me thin wall, "short" pins for their pistons..!

      Ha, I know, doesn't answer your question, I'll shut up.

      Mike

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      • #4
        Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
        When several engines are going together at once, it's necessary to examine each part to insure the right stuff stays together.

        Both the OEM 259" pistons and the Egge Machine replacements have barrel skirts and straight wall wrist pins. The 289"s always seem to have slipper skirts and tapered wall wrist pins.

        Here's the unexpected data point; the straight wall wrist pins are slightly lighter in weight than the tapered pins. At a glance, everyone chooses the straight wall pin as heavier than the tapered, but the scale doesn't agree.

        Since the cylinder diameters are the same, since both the 259" and the 289" engines were built on the same assembly line from 1956-1964, why did Studebaker choose to stock two different wrist pins and two different skirt designs?

        jack vines
        I am just guessing but maybe there were two different suppliers. Any piston supplier would also be supplying the pins.
        james r pepper

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        • #5
          Different part number= different part. The 259 is different than the 289. They have different parts if that is the question.

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          • #6
            Are the pins the same length?

            With the material generically re-distributed as described, the 289 pin is likely stronger and stiffer than the 259 pin.
            If OEM Studebaker parts are like that, it sounds like that was likely the intended goal.

            Would the 259 style full skirt piston smash into the crank counterweights?
            Crank clearance is just one reason for using slipper skirts.

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