Announcement

Collapse

Get more Tips, Specs and Technical Data!

Did you know... this Forum is a service of the Studebaker Drivers Club? For more technical tips, specifications, history and tech data, visit the Tech Tips page at the SDC Homepage: www.studebakerdriversclub.com/tips.asp
See more
See less

Conversion to LED Headlights

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by bezhawk View Post
    If you do decide to use halogen bulbs, be aware they draw more current, and will trip the circuit breakers and you will be totally in the dark. They also will burn up the headlight switches if you do not wire them with a remote power relay.
    If you get the right reflectors, and the correct LEDs you won't have any of those problems.
    Brad, this is the first I have heard this. My car is actually running an 8 volt system and these are 6 volt bulbs. Would that make a difference?
    Ed Sallia
    Dundee, OR

    Sol Lucet Omnibus

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by bezhawk View Post
      If you do decide to use halogen bulbs, be aware they draw more current, and will trip the circuit breakers and you will be totally in the dark. They also will burn up the headlight switches if you do not wire them with a remote power relay.
      If you get the right reflectors, and the correct LEDs you won't have any of those problems.
      Brad, this is the first I have heard this. My car is actually running an 8 volt system and these are 6 volt bulbs. Would that make a difference?
      Ed Sallia
      Dundee, OR

      Sol Lucet Omnibus

      Comment


      • #18
        I have been using Halogens in all Studes for over a decade (always with 30 amp headlight CB). But LEDs have taken usable brightness to a whole other level. LED "Driving lights" are popular on all types of vehicles, motorcycles, cars, off-road vehicles, etc.. To see what they are capable of, look up clearwaterlights.com. They make driving lights that put out 6,000 lumens (each) on only 60 watts of power. Compare to the halogens' 700 lumen low beams and 1200 high beams on our Studes. The Clearwater's come with an adjustable dimmer, and most users set at 10-15 percent, lest they blind other drivers. They also have a feature that kicks the lights to 100 percent anytime the horn is blown!

        I am sure there are 7" LEDs out there somewhere for our Studes that far exceeds anything we have ever seen in halogens. Need to think out of the box, if driving our Studes on into the 21st century. LOL

        Comment


        • #19
          I have glass headlight conversion reflectors made for halogens and am using halogen to LED conversion bulbs. Brightest and coolest(to the touch) headlights that I have ever seen. I am not concerned about heat melting anything in my wiring harness or switches. Granted the glass conversion reflectors don't have same exact convex shape on outside as the original bulbs and you do have to cut the back out of your headlamp buckets to let the long LED lamps fit with their cooling fans, it is a hot rodded version of a '55 and I don't care about authenticity.

          Comment


          • #20
            Hi Mike,
            As per Mike Van's comments, I agree and have successfully used Cibie Biode lamps for decades. As mentioned by Brad Bez, you must upgrade the gauge of wire and use relays to keep the integrity of the rest of the system. These lamps allow the use of 100 watt bulbs for low beam and 130 watt for the specialized high beams. It literally turns nighttime into brilliant daylight as on high beam you are running 460 watts.
            Good luck,
            Bill

            Comment

            Working...
            X