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Crank Pulley Bolt

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  • Engine: Crank Pulley Bolt

    Hello.
    The manual states on a 289, 130-140 lb on the crank pulley bolt, just wondering how to stop it spinning while tightening, is it ok to use a rattle gun?

    regards, Cus
    sigpic

  • #2
    I would stay away from an impact wrench.
    I would lock the ring gear/flywheel with a proper tool, or a simple ViceGrip and use a torque wrench.
    HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

    Jeff


    Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



    Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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    • #3
      If the oil pan is off, you can stick a 1/2" drive socket extension into one of the deeper balance holes in a crankshaft journal. Let it roll up against the block, and then tighten the bolt. I have forgotten on 259/289, but the 352 has a plate on the bottom of the flywheel cover where you can place a small piece of wood up against the flywheel teeth. Pretty sure the 259/289 has something similar. I use a floor jack under the wood, jack it up slightly to hold tension on the wood, then tighten the bolt.

      Whatever you decide, be VERY careful not to chip a flywheel tooth. They are much weaker than you'd think, and easily chipped. I chipped one with a screwdriver. If the happens, you must remove the flywheel and replace the ring gear!

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      • #4
        Thanks for the replies,
        ended up cutting a wedge of nolathane & wedged between the ring gear & bell housing,
        worked a treat, & no chance of chipped teeth,

        regards, Cus
        sigpic

        Comment


        • #5
          Not to be condescending to any of you wise old mechanics who already know, but we never know when we have new folks coming into the hobby with a new set of tools and very little experience. Therefore, may I offer the following caution...Since it was mentioned (and thankfully not used)...let me offer this about impact wrenches.

          Just like a hand ratchet, they come in different drive sizes of 3/8"-1/2", & 3/4," but the most common for us is the 1/2" drive. As a general rule, they are designed to perform with 90psi input pressure at anywhere from 10 to 22 cfm of air flow. Rule of thumb is that after 5 hammer blows (the rattle you hear as it operates)...it has reached it maximum torque for the fastener you are driving. These are not very exact specs and there is a very wide range for error. Depending on the quality of your tool (say...Ingersol Rand vs Harbor Freight), and the compressor supplying the air. So...be careful when using them on parts with critical tolerances.

          I spent years selling, supplying, and repairing these tools. I've been out of the business for years now and things might have changed since. They are wonderful tools and sometimes you can get away with taking risks with them. But, if you decide to violate the rules of application, be ready to accept the consequences and hopefully have enough extra parts to correct the damage.
          John Clary
          Greer, SC

          SDC member since 1975

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by jclary View Post
            Not to be condescending to any of you wise old mechanics who already know, but we never know when we have new folks coming into the hobby with a new set of tools and very little experience. Therefore, may I offer the following caution...Since it was mentioned (and thankfully not used)...let me offer this about impact wrenches.

            Just like a hand ratchet, they come in different drive sizes of 3/8"-1/2", & 3/4," but the most common for us is the 1/2" drive. As a general rule, they are designed to perform with 90psi input pressure at anywhere from 10 to 22 cfm of air flow. Rule of thumb is that after 5 hammer blows (the rattle you hear as it operates)...it has reached it maximum torque for the fastener you are driving. These are not very exact specs and there is a very wide range for error. Depending on the quality of your tool (say...Ingersol Rand vs Harbor Freight), and the compressor supplying the air. So...be careful when using them on parts with critical tolerances.

            I spent years selling, supplying, and repairing these tools. I've been out of the business for years now and things might have changed since. They are wonderful tools and sometimes you can get away with taking risks with them. But, if you decide to violate the rules of application, be ready to accept the consequences and hopefully have enough extra parts to correct the damage.
            sigpic

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by jclary View Post
              be ready to accept the consequences and hopefully have enough extra parts to correct the damage.
              Guilty as charged!
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              • #8
                Another thing: Do NOT attempt to pull the vibration damper onto the snout of the crank with the bolt: Use the proper tool, or you risk stripping the bolt threads, or worse, the crank threads. Ask me how I know. The tool is available for rent from several vendors.
                Ron Dame
                '63 Champ

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by norvada
                  Guilty as charged!
                  Originally posted by Ron Dame View Post
                  Another thing: Do NOT attempt to pull the vibration damper onto the snout of the crank with the bolt: Use the proper tool, or you risk stripping the bolt threads, or worse, the crank threads. Ask me how I know. The tool is available for rent from several vendors.
                  We see more abuse of the crank bolt than any other engine part. Because not every farmer had the necessary 1-1/2" socket, the marks of loosening the bolt with a cold chisel never go away. And yes, it's so common to find stripped threads, we had to buy a 11/16" tap set to clean and restore them.

                  jack vines

                  PackardV8

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by PackardV8b View Post

                    We see more abuse of the crank bolt than any other engine part. Because not every farmer had the necessary 1-1/2" socket, the marks of loosening the bolt with a cold chisel never go away. And yes, it's so common to find stripped threads, we had to buy a 11/16" tap set to clean and restore them.

                    jack vines
                    Thinking of ABUSE!...Oh my! 😧You reminded me of another cruel fact. That thin head 1 1/2” bolt will abuse you back! Years ago I was working on an engine in the car. For some reason I needed to turn the crank just slightly. I think I was installing a distributor. I had a socket on the crank bolt and a firm grip on the ratchet handle. As I increased my pulling power (proud of my biceps) the evil bolt head suddenly slipped out of the socket. Perfectly slamming my thumbnail into the water pump pulley! Oh the throbbing pain!
                    John Clary
                    Greer, SC

                    SDC member since 1975

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