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Camshaft recommendation for turbo 289

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  • Engine: Camshaft recommendation for turbo 289

    OK.
    Hoping the engine guru's will weight in here on this one.
    I'm looking for a camshaft recommendation for a mildly boosted 289. (5 to 8 psi NOW) more with forged pistons later.
    Not a drag car but a highway cruiser with some kick in the pants.
    Rear gear of 3:55
    5 speed manual gear box.
    Near stock full flow 1963- 289 with 8.50 to 1 comp ratio
    4bbl as of now possibly FI tech fuel injection later
    What grind?
    Who's grind?

  • #2
    This sounds like a good question for Ted Harbit - he was running dual turbos on the Chicken Hawk toward the end of its carrier. Good luck.

    Comment


    • #3
      Not much to choose from..! Unless you have someone build you a roller cam.
      So, the factory R2, or the aftermarket R2+ cams are your choices.
      No one is building flat tappet cams, so you are relegated to regrinds of OEM cores. And as you might imagine, you can't add material to make a cam bigger, without a ton of money spent.

      Both the R series cams can be had by a few of the Stude vendors.
      Ted Harbit does not sell parts any longer.
      Phil at "Fairborn Studebaker" bought all of Teds stock and has added his own various bits of stock. Good guy, he'll advise you on what he has or can get.

      Mike

      Comment


      • #4
        As Mike said.... The R2 or the R2+ reground cam is about your only choice on a flat tappet cam.
        And, since you stated your boost parameters, it sounds like a good match, since the Paxton output spec's are similar.
        The R2 and R2+ are regrind cams, so you would need to supply a core cam, or send in your cam to be done.
        ALWAYS put new, or reconditioned lifters in with a cam change... ALWAYS.
        To take advantage of the new cam, you should put new R2 valve springs in.
        Do not trust your old valve springs to be decent.
        Phil Harris usually has reground cams and matching lifters in stock.

        However, if you were to get deeper into the possibilities...
        If you had one of the engine builders put ALL of your spec's into a cam program, or engine dyno simulator program, you could get real specific as to what the ultimate combo you could shoot for.
        Having said that, you then could contact Phil Harris at Fairborn Studebaker and order the roller cam of your dreams.
        Phil has new roller cam blanks in stock and can have the profile of your choice installed.
        The roller cam would require a change in lifters, a change in pushrods, and a change in distributor drive gear.
        There are even hydraulic roller lifters available, so the days of valve adjustment and clatter can be put in the past.
        Pretty extreme (ie:$$) for a mild street engine.
        But it is possible.
        Last edited by DEEPNHOCK; 09-16-2019, 06:39 AM.
        HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

        Jeff


        Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



        Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

        Comment


        • #5
          X3 what Jeff and Mike say. The following are just one computer simulation. Your opinions and results will vary.

          Your ideal cam for best torque might be a solid roller in the range of 268-intake and 280-exhaust on 110 LCA with .525" lift.
          The max horsepower cam would be a solid roller too wild for the street, 280-intake and 292-exhaust on 116 LCA with .550" lift

          It's just time and money to make that happen. As suggested, a custom roller cam, roller lifters, custom pushrods, custom valve springs and valves would be about $2500.

          Then, to get the maximum benefit from all that, a custom intake and carburetor with professional porting of intake and heads is another $2500.

          For the $5000 investment, it would produce an additional 100 horsepower, est 400hp, over the readily available R2 or R2+ cam, R3 intake valves, good springs on OEM heads and intake which turbocharged would make about 300hp.

          jack vines
          PackardV8

          Comment


          • #6
            In order to get the most from any Studebaker V8 rebuild, you need to carefully check the condition of your valve springs.
            On the subject of valve springs, here is a short video of what I have found is a good way to check valve springs.
            Generic, yes. But hopefully informative.


            HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

            Jeff


            Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



            Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

            Comment


            • #7
              Thanks Jeff.
              Super cool rig you mustered up there.
              I get that any performance seeker should have good components.
              But specifically have you found valve float due to RPM increase over stock,
              or is it the way boosted intake (pressurized) charge can hang up the intake valve?

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Maxeffort View Post
                <snip>
                But specifically have you found valve float due to RPM increase over stock,
                or is it the way boosted intake (pressurized) charge can hang up the intake valve?
                (opinion)
                Boost or no boost. Studebaker springs are rpm limited due to the weight of all the components.
                New springs are a must if you intend on running higher rpm.



                HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

                Jeff


                Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



                Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

                Comment


                • #9
                  The Stude blower is not putting out enough pressure to overcome a springs load, not even remotely close.
                  It's all dependent on the current quality (pressure) of the spring.

                  In order of spring pressure (in lbs.). Highest load to lowest load.
                  1 - New, R3 type spring.
                  2 - Used, R3 type spring.
                  3 - New, standard spring.
                  4 - Used, standard spring.

                  Note that numbers 2 and 3 are most probably fairly close in pressure.
                  Number 4 is normally good for only about 4000 to maybe 4500 rpm.

                  Mike

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Only slightly off topic, but we no longer use the Studebaker springs unless someone absolutely is adamant about it. We've had custom valves and springs made up and the result is higher quality valve springs and R3 size intake valves at the same cost as the reproduction Studebaker valves and springs.

                    jack vines
                    PackardV8

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Not too many issues of Turning Wheels ago a member had high praise for Roy Chambers, RC Automotive Machine Shop in Capitol Heights, MD. 301.350.8408
                      Roy used to grind cams for racers of all kind, including NASCAR back when they still ran (couldn't help it, had a competition license too many years, no clue what they're up to now.)
                      He manufactured crankshafts too. One wall of the shop is covered with cam profiles.
                      It may take some effort to actually talk with him, his son usually answers the phone and he can be...prickly.

                      Comment

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