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Measuring Chamber Volume - How To

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  • Measuring Chamber Volume - How To

    I needed to cc a pair of heads and thought I'd take some pics along the way in case some one had need of it.

    The supplies I used were a jar of Vaseline, bottle of alcohol, a large syringe, a piece of clear plastic (a CD case would work)


    Using the Vaseline, seal around the valves and a bead around the chamber.


    Place the clear plastic panel over the chamber with a small hole near the top edge. Push down on the plastic to squeee the vaseline into an air tight seal. Begin introducing the alcohol through the hole in the plastic, keeping track of how much is used.


    When the alcohol fills the chamber to the hole with no air add up the CC's used in the syringe. That is the volume of your chamber.


    Intake and exhaust runners can be measured the same way. I use alcohol because water always leaves little bubbles that throw the volume off. There are several compression ratio calculators on the net. You will need your chamber volume, head gasket thickness and bore diameter, as well as the bore and stroke of your engine, deck to piston distance and any dish, dome, or valve reliefs.

    My chambers measured 61.5 cc's and with my head gasket and pistons calculates to 9.6 to 1

    This is an important thing to do when doing head work to make sure the chambers are consistent from cylinder to cylinder as well as knowing what fuel you need to be using for best performance.

    I hope you get some use from this, even if it's a better understanding of what you pay for when you have head work done.

    Jim

    _________1966 Avanti II RQA 0088______________________1963 Avanti R2 63R3152_______________Rabid Snail Racing
    Jim
    Often in error, never in doubt
    http://rabidsnailracing.blogspot.com/

    ____1966 Avanti II RQA 0088_______________1963 Avanti R2 63R3152____________http://rabidsnailracing.blogspot.com/

  • #2
    Interesting. I often wondered if there was an easier way to do it. Always seen it done with long pipette, and what looked like a chemistry set.

    Comment


    • #3
      I've always heard that you should use kerosene or diesel fuel instead of alcohol.

      Comment


      • #4
        I always use Jack Daniels. Pretty relaxed after the 8th shot, I mean
        cylinder.

        Tom

        '63 Avanti, zinc plated drilled & slotted 03 Mustang Cobra 13" front disc/98 GT rear brakes, 03 Cobra 17" wheels, GM alt, 97 Z28 leather seats, soon: TKO 5-spd, Ported heads w/SST full flow valves, 'R3' 276 cam, Edelbrock AFB Carb, GM HEI distributor, 8.8mm plug wires
        '63 Avanti R1, '03 Mustang Cobra 13" front disc/98 GT rear brakes, 03 Cobra 17" wheels, GM alt, 97 Z28 leather seats, TKO 5-spd, Ported heads w/SST full flow valves.
        Check out my disc brake adapters to install 1994-2004 Mustang disc brakes on your Studebaker!!
        http://forum.studebakerdriversclub.c...bracket-update
        I have also written many TECH how to articles, do a search for my Forum name to find them

        Comment


        • #5
          I used to have the burette, stand and plexiglass, but over the years they were "retasked", so I made do with I could scrounge around the house. The advantage of alcohol is it makes smaller droplets when you get to that drop by drop stage, plus no oily residue for cleanup.

          Jim

          _________1966 Avanti II RQA 0088______________________1963 Avanti R2 63R3152_______________Rabid Snail Racing
          Jim
          Often in error, never in doubt
          http://rabidsnailracing.blogspot.com/

          ____1966 Avanti II RQA 0088_______________1963 Avanti R2 63R3152____________http://rabidsnailracing.blogspot.com/

          Comment


          • #6
            Great pictures, and good text, what valves are you using?

            Comment


            • #7
              I like to use a dark grease so I can tell if any gets squeezed into the chamber. I air check the valves by shooting air into the ports and spraying wd40 onto the valve. Shouldn't be any bubbles at all. So I don't seal the valves with anything because that would throw off the reading. I like to use transmission fluid because the red color shows up right away if any should drip or leak. I can never find the stuff I used the last time to cc, so I just go to Rite-Aid for a large syringe and break up some window glass until I find a piece with a curve that will form a little trough to feed the trans fluid thru.

              Comment


              • #8
                quote:what valves are you using?
                Answering for Jim....I do believe they are from Ted Harbit/Fairborn Studebaker.
                The R3 version.

                Mike

                P.s - I still use the old burrete, alcohol, Vaseline method.
                Sometimes I'll put a drop of trans. fluid in for color...normally not though..
                No matter what...that last single little bubble is a pain to get out!

                Comment


                • #9
                  Nice photos. My 5 cents: What everyone else said plus if your chambers aren't equal, die grind the 7 smaller ones (around the the chamber "wall" closest to the valve) to equal the largest chamber, and then if necessary surface the heads to drop the cc where you want it. A time-consuming process. Oh, and keep your valves assigned to the same cylinder that they were cc'd with.

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