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1958 HAWK Transmission Pan Leak

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  • 1958 HAWK Transmission Pan Leak

    1958 Studebaker Silver Hawk. Having a problem with the seal from the transmission pan to the automatic transmission.

    No matter what is used: a cork gasket, a rubber gasket, a fiber gasket, or automotive silicone....NONE WORKS! After the car runs then shut off and sits for a couple of hours, the leak accurs on the driverside rear corner. Both the pan and tranny surfaced are smooth, flat as a tabletop.

    Frustration is begining to set in.
    CAN ANYONE HEPL!!!

    Pat

  • #2
    Frustrated; these Trans. oil pan leaks are usually due to the pan being overfilled. When it is parked and leaking you could get an idea how bad it is by just leaving the engine off and checking the fluid, is it a LOT overfilled or just a little?

    This can sometimes be caused by Trans. bushings being very worn in the front pump, front case bushing etc. many Trans. shops cannot find some of the bushings and do not replace them all, if you allow air to enter the Torque Converter it will drain more than normal and overfill the pan.

    Also do you have the correct cap and dipstick Assy. that is checked inside of the car? With the engine and Trans. warmed up in DRIVE (wheels chocked) idling at 650 RPM does it show on the Full mark and NOT over?

    And be sure it is not coming from the Governor inspection hole cover gasket on the tailshaft or a Trans. gasket other than the pan.

    StudeRich
    Studebakers Northwest
    Ferndale, WA
    StudeRich
    Second Generation Stude Driver,
    Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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    • #3
      What Rich said, plus, the shift-shaft seals will also give that same indication. Looks like a pan leak, but it ain't. As you stated, this occurs after its been run and then shut off for a while. The converter drains down back into the pan, filling it up to the level of the shift shaft...then the leak starts. Replacement of those seals requires removeal of the pan and valve body as well as the left side exhaust pipe. Not too difficult.....if you pay close attention on how everything comes apart. The shop manual does come in handy. Hope this helps.

      Dan Miller
      Atlanta, GA

      [img=left]http://static.flickr.com/57/228744729_7aff5f0118_m.jpg[/img=left]
      Road Racers turn left AND right.

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      • #4
        Thanks guys! It was a combination of the shift shaft seal and the correct adhesive put on the tranny pan gasket.

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