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  • Low Oil Pressure (1962 Hawk)

    Hi All,

    Our club president recently purchased a 1962 Hawk which has low oil pressure. He told me last night the seller said he restored it a "couple of years ago" [)] and when he contacted him again he said it was restored in '91 (couple of years - yeah right).

    In any case, what suggestions do you have as to possible causes to avoid them having to pull the engine. Trevor isn't a Computer person and I can pass on the details to him.

    Thanx in anticipation.

    PS I can't be specific I just know the pressure is low.

    John Clements
    Avantilover, your South Australian Studebaker lover!!!
    Secretary Studebaker Car Club of SA (as of 3/19/08)
    Lockleys South Australia
    John Clements
    Christchurch, New Zealand

  • #2
    Rod bearings are the first thing to come to mind. Can be done without pulling the engine, but if those are bad, there might be other things that are bad. If the PO had done a fast and nasty rebuild, he might not have replaced the cam bearings, and this is adding to the problem. I would try the rod bearings, and if that doesn't help, than pull the engine. By the way, how low is the oil pressure? I have seen them run at 15 lbs. and live a good long life.

    Comment


    • #3
      I'd check the pressure with another non-electric type gage.

      Comment


      • #4
        First things first....
        Service the pressure relief valve.
        (Everyone should do this... It is routine maintenance).
        Then verify oil pressure is correct with another gauge.
        Jeff[8D]


        http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock
        HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

        Jeff


        Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



        Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

        Comment


        • #5
          That is a good point Mike...
          We all take for granted that new cam bearings assures good cam to bearing clearances.
          But, all of our cams are aging, and wearing.
          Oversized cam bearings for a Stude are non existant.
          Jerry Forrester found this out during his last rebuild.
          One other area that is not looked at very often (if ever) is the rod side clearance.
          If your engine is on it's third freshen up, this clearance can be quite large and a lot of oil can get slung out there.
          But..
          I still say that the diagnosis should be a methdical, and step by step process.
          Tearing it all apart could be as confusing as finding the source of the low oil pressure.
          I haven't heard anything about 'how', or 'what' was done (or wasn't done) on the rebuild.
          Was the pump rebuilt/serviced/replaced?
          Lot's of questions.
          And all worthy comments.
          Jeff[8D]


          quote:Originally posted by hotwheels63r2

          I hate to say it, but the first thing to go on an engine that has sat around is cam bearings. The engine will run run fine right up until oil pressure goes away. They are also the most overlooked or improperly installed items. (check everything else first)
          MIKE
          http://community.webshots.com/user/deepnhock
          HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

          Jeff


          Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



          Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

          Comment


          • #6
            OK, how about this on a full-flow 289: Great oil pressure (50-60 lbs @ 2000 rpm) when cold. Still very good (25-45 lbs) when hot at anything above about 1000 rpm, but at slow (600/700 rpm)idle hot it drops to around 3-5 lbs. I'm thinking (hoping) this might indicate an oil pump rather than a bearing problem, but I'm not sure. Ideas?


            Steve Hudson
            The Dalles, Oregon
            1949 "GMOBaker" 1-T Dually (workhorse)
            1953 Commander Convertible (show & go)
            1953 Champion Starliner (custom/rod project)
            1954 Champion Coupe (daily driver)
            1960 Hawk (future project?)

            Steve Hudson
            The Dalles, Oregon
            1949 \"GMOBaker\" 1-T Dually (workhorse)
            1953 Commander Convertible (show & go)
            1953 "Studacudallac" (project)

            Comment


            • #7
              This was years ago in one of the Stude publications...Turning Wheels Q&A, Avanti Magazine, one of the now defunct Stude newsletters, but I remember a similar question came up regarding "R" engines. Essentially, the answer was that at long as it held 40 psi or so at 2000 rpms (at normal operating temperature) it was fine. The author of the reply (whomever that was), also said Studebaker V8 engines thrived pretty well at low oil pressure at idle.

              I can't vouch for the accuracy of the statement, but that's what I remember.




              Poet...Mystic...Soldier of Fortune. As always...self-absorbed, adversarial, cocky and in general a malcontent.
              Poet...Mystic...Soldier of Fortune. As always...self-absorbed, adversarial, cocky and in general a malcontent.

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks Guys I'll print out the topic and see what happens, as I think I stated, it's not my car and low oil pressure (details unstated) is all I know. You've given us lots to consider many thanks.

                John Clements
                Avantilover, your South Australian Studebaker lover!!!
                Secretary Studebaker Car Club of SA (as of 3/19/08)
                Lockleys South Australia
                John Clements
                Christchurch, New Zealand

                Comment


                • #9
                  The other side of the coin is: if the majority of us driving our late full-flow V-8's and many early ones always have a 60 MPH & above cruise pressure of 60-70 PSI and a hot idle of 35-40 PSI, why should Steve or anyone else drive around with less, waiting for the time bomb to explode?

                  Any weakness in the Main, Rod or Cam Bearings eventually WILL cause a major breakdown, whereas worn lifter bores, rocker arm shafts, excess rod side clearance etc. may go a very long time or forever on a tough engine like a Stude. V-8...or NOT! Either way, low oil press. is very normal in some engines, but NOT a Stude. V-8! [:0]

                  quote:Originally posted by Gunslinger

                  /Cut/ Essentially, the answer was that at long as it held 40 psi or so at 2000 rpms (at normal operating temperature) it was fine.
                  StudeRich
                  Studebakers Northwest
                  Ferndale, WA
                  StudeRich
                  Second Generation Stude Driver,
                  Proud '54 Starliner Owner

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    When I got my 54 Commander Starliner, it had what turned out to be 12 thou clearance on #5 rod bearing. I couldn't afford to fix it right away, so I drove it like that for about a year and a half. Lots of STP and 40 weight oil! Oil pressure hot idling was an indicated zero on the dash gauge. At 50 mph - which was when the rod rattle showed up - the gauge read 10 pounds. I drove it everywhere and didn't baby it. It never quit and that is one of the reasons I still have it.

                    Terry Godkin
                    Surrey, British Columbia
                    27 Dictator Custom Sedan
                    54 Commander Starliner

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      quote:Originally posted by StudeRich

                      The other side of the coin is: if the majority of us driving our late full-flow V-8's and many early ones always have a 60 MPH & above cruise pressure of 60-70 PSI and a hot idle of 35-40 PSI, why should Steve or anyone else drive around with less, waiting for the time bomb to explode?

                      Any weakness in the Main, Rod or Cam Bearings eventually WILL cause a major breakdown, whereas worn lifter bores, rocker arm shafts, excess rod side clearance etc. may go a very long time or forever on a tough engine like a Stude. V-8...or NOT! Either way, low oil press. is very normal in some engines, but NOT a Stude. V-8! [:0]

                      "the majority of us driving our late full-flow V-8's and many early ones always have a 60 MPH & above cruise pressure of 60-70 PSI and a hot idle of 35-40 PSI,"

                      Seriously? The majority?

                      Dick Steinkamp
                      Bellingham, WA



                      Dick Steinkamp
                      Bellingham, WA

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I find myself wondering about whether some one from Australia may refer to a rebuilt engine as being 'restored'. That coupled with the other sketchy information and lack of specifics leads me to bring up the plug for the oil galley that is in the distributor silo, since no one else has mentioned it yet. If this were left out during the 'restoration' the oil pressure would be critically low.

                        Tim K.
                        '64 R2 GT Hawk
                        Tim K.
                        \'64 R2 GT Hawk

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Hu guys,

                          This may be a stupid question but I'm an engine newbee how do the rod Bearings and cam Bearing affect the oil preassure if they're worn?

                          Thanks

                          Steve

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Steve -

                            When any bearing wears, there is more clearance between the crank / cam and their respective bearings. The oil pump is constantly trying to fill that extra gap. What happens when that extra gap has a rotating member (crank and cam), not only does the extra gap need to be filled, but it's also running OUT faster than the pump can keep the gap filled....the oil that IS trying to lube the bearings is running out of that area "faster" than it should.....so there is no way a stock oil pump can keep up with all of the additional "leaks" in the system.

                            The exact same thing happens at the cam and its bearings, the lifters and the block, the rods (width) and the crank.

                            The more "leaks" that can be plugged, and still keep the proper bearing clearances, the higher the oil pressure will be.
                            But as an engine is used, and its pieces wear, these leaks grow...oil pressure is lost.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Mike,

                              Thanks for the info.

                              Steve

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