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cab mounting springs

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  • cab mounting springs

    The springs that the cab on my 55 truck sits on under the front corners are very rusty. I am removing the cab an putting it on another frame . I would like to replace the springs .They look like valve springs . I'm wondering if replacing them waith rubber cushions would work ok. Any advice wil be appreciated.Thanks


    thom
    thom

  • #2
    The later trucks used a rubber donut instead of the spring. If you have a later truck parts book, they may even still be available from SASCO.

    Skip Lackie
    Washington DC
    Skip Lackie

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    • #3
      After reading my own post I realized that I worded it wrong. I know that the cab doesn't sit on the springs. Actually the springs go under the head of the bolt, above the cab corner.The springs would be compressed when the cab were to raise up , not go down. Thanks.

      thom
      thom

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      • #4
        I used valve springs on my 49 C-Cab.


        7G-Q1 49 2R12 10G-F5 56B-D4 56B-F2
        As soon as you find a product you like they will stop making it.

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        • #5
          Actually, only ONE front mount point is sprung. The other side gets washers a spacer and a solid rubber spacer/washer ("solid" as in a Stude car body mount pad). Likewise - at the rear mounts - one bolt has a metal tubular spacer that effectively makes it a rigid mount while the other one relies on a tubular rubber mount. This arrangtement allows the frame to flex without it trying to rib the rather rigid cab assembly apart!

          And with T-cabs, you'll see folks try to incorporate the LARK body mounts to the frame (on the ersatz notion that they'll be better supporting the cab) since they seem so logically situated right over the frame rails. DON'T DO IT. Stude didn't and it was for a reason - not just to save money.[B)]

          1957 Transtar 1/2ton
          1960 Larkvertible V8
          1958 Provincial wagon
          1953 Commander coupe
          1957 President two door

          No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

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          • #6
            The early C-cab trucks used the same rear springs as the M5 trucks:
            6.5-7 coils, ~2" free height, O.D. = 1.223, wire diameter = 0.224, ends ground flat, ~2100 lbs/inch spring rate. The front spring (right side) was 3.5 coils, probably the same spring cut in half. On the M trucks, the left side was bolted down solid, but could rotate a little around the bolt head. A valve spring would be a good match if you can find something with the right spring rate, o.d, and length. The springs only need to have the bolts tightened to compress them about 1/4". The purpose of the springs was to keep from warping the cab when the frame flexed on a bump. Twisting the cab would cause the metal to fail and crack, so never bolt a cab or any other Studebaker body down solid.

            If you can find new rubber parts from later C-cabs, they may be OK. But, even NOS parts that are 40-50 years old are probably too hard and too prone to crackiong to use.

            [img=left]http://www.studegarage.com/images/gary_ash_m5_sm.jpg[/img=left] Gary Ash
            Dartmouth, Mass.
            '48 M5
            '65 Wagonaire Commander
            '63 Wagonaire Standard
            web site at http://www.studegarage.com
            Gary Ash
            Dartmouth, Mass.

            '32 Indy car replica (in progress)
            ’41 Commander Land Cruiser
            '48 M5
            '65 Wagonaire Commander
            '63 Wagonaire Standard
            web site at http://www.studegarage.com

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            • #7
              Concerning cab corner springs and spacers does anyone know the correct thickness for a M-5 pickup, all my spacers rotted away, what about the bed any spacers used there? While I`m here I`m looking for a clean tailgate and a set of hinges at a a fair price. Any help would be great. Thanks in advance for any help. michaelb

              Comment


              • #8
                quote:Originally posted by michaelb

                Concerning cab corner springs and spacers does anyone know the correct thickness for a M-5 pickup, all my spacers rotted away, what about the bed any spacers used there? While I`m here I`m looking for a clean tailgate and a set of hinges at a a fair price. Any help would be great. Thanks in advance for any help. michaelb
                The cab spacers came in a couple of thicknesses from 1/16 to 3/16". The parts book says "use as required" or something like that. The factory used different thicknesses to level the frame and allow some room for cab flexing. The ones I've seen were cut from tire sidewalls. I think the M series trucks used different rubber spacers than the later trucks, but SASCO still lists part number 311446X in a number of thicknesses for $1 apiece.

                Skip Lackie
                Washington DC
                Skip Lackie

                Comment

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