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1964 Studebaker Gran-Turismo Hawk Tech Help

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  • 1964 Studebaker Gran-Turismo Hawk Tech Help

    My name is Sean and I'm an auto mechanic in Palm Springs, CA. I have a 1964 Studebaker Gran-Turismo Hawk that I inhereted from my Godfather since 1987. The car itself is located in the L.A. area sitting in the backyard of my relative''s house. It hasn't been started and driven since 1992, but it was moved few times around the house. I have talked to other proud Studebaker owners and they told me some few proceedures, but never worked on their own car. I would like someone, who has worked on these kind of cars to give me an advice on the actual proceedures on getting this car started and running. I believe there is some lacking of specific instructions. Here is my questions to those instructions.

    1. What type of motor oil my 289 engine will use? Is there a specific brand for it?
    2. What type of tranny oil my auto transmission require?
    3. What type of battery the car uses?
    4. What type of spark plug wires and does any auto parts carries them?
    5. What are the proceedures on hooking up a battery
    6 What are the proceedures in engine timing afte installing new plugs and wires and distributor cap?
    7. Can someone show me a diagram for the vacuum hoses, if equipped?

    I will be in L.A. this coming Thanksgiving to look at the car's condition and will start the proceedures this coming Christmas. Thank you very much for your time and will be looking forward to hear from you. Email me at sean_rich@yahoo.com, if you have full details in the proceedures to get the 289 engine with an auto trans running.

    Sean


    Sean Rich D. Villariasa

  • #2
    Welcome, Sean; but your post doesn't make sense to me...?

    You say you're an auto mechanic; your questions posted are all very basic... if you're a mechanic, you certainly should know, or know how to easily find out, all these answers...

    Even a backyard mechanic with the slightest bit of automotive knowledge can, for example, put in a battery-

    1. Obtain battery
    2. Bring to car
    3. Put in battery tray
    4. Connect cables

    See what I mean? [)]

    Please elaborate on your post.

    Robert K. Andrews Owner- IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
    Parish, central NY 13131
    http://www.cardomain.com/ride/2358680/1

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    • #3
      What I'm trying to say is there any special proceedures in getting the 289 engine running and connecting the battery and what kind of battery does my 1964 GT hawk take?

      Sean Rich D. Villariasa

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      • #4
        Also this is the first time I'm fixing up a studebaker? Please shed me some light.

        Sean Rich D. Villariasa

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        • #5
          There is nothing unusual about a Studebaker, it is pretty much just like any other American built car of the era. If it hasn't been started in a long time, use the usual start up proceedure for an engine that has sat for a long time. Pull the spark plugs and squirt a light oil into each cylinder. While that is soaking in, drain the old oil out and fill with a light oil, say a 10w30. Pull the distributor and use a reverse turning drill with a blade to fit the oil pump to turn the oil pump until you show oil pressure on the gage. Use a big socket on the crankshaft bolt to turn the engine over a few complete turns (at least two complete revolutions, more if possible). Check all the wiring and replace what looks bad. Put the distributor back in and add the battery and give it a crank to see what happens. I assume you can check the coil and fuel supply and the fuel pump and carburetor, since you are a mechanic. Really, a Stude is just another car, don't be afraid of it. They are much simpler than the modern computer controlled versions. Once you get it running and up to temperature, shut it off and change the oil to 15w45 Diesel rated oil. A set of plug wires for a 318 Chrysler will fit, although there are others that will work as well.

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          • #6
            Welcome to the forum Sean,
            For starters, I'd recommend you purchase a 59' through 64' Stude shop manual and parts manual...you'll need them for refrence many times. Several of the vendors listed on the SDC web site sell these. You'll be able to read up on all the procedures you have questions on. Hope this helps
            Dan Miller

            [img=left]http://static.flickr.com/57/228744729_7aff5f0118_m.jpg[/img=left]
            Road Racers turn left AND right.

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            • #7
              My preferences:

              oil: 15W40 "fleet" oil such as Rotella or Delo. 5W40 synthetic version of same if it isn't a leaker (yeah, good luck with that.)

              ATF: current version of Dexron, or Type F if you like firm shifts.

              Battery: I think it's a Group 24, whichever version has the negative terminal to the rear of the car when the battery is installed so that the terminals are on the inside of the engine bay (top post)

              Spark Plug Wires: there are wires custom made for Studebakers by Scott Performance; JDP, Ray F, Dave T and others sell them. I've been told some MoPar wires are a close fit as well.

              Timing: just follow the shop manual, it's worth it to buy one

              Vacuum hoses: HAHAHAHA not much there. Ported vacuum to the distributor. If it's an R1 there are a few more hoses, if you have chrome valve covers and a normal-looking harmonic balancer post back and I'll go into more detail.

              Also I think somewhere on this site is a short guide to resurrecting a "barn car," might want to check that out.

              good luck,

              nate



              --
              55 Commander Starlight
              http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel
              --
              55 Commander Starlight
              http://members.cox.net/njnagel

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              • #8
                Glad to know there are others in Palm Springs too. Welcome.

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                • #9
                  OPPS, we all make them you know! I think Nate mean't to say Negative (-) terminal FORWARD when posts are "to" engine and Positive (+) Post to rear of car. The other way around and you would have a 24F (Ford Batt.)

                  quote:Originally posted by N8N

                  Battery: I think it's a Group 24, whichever version has the negative terminal to the rear of the car when the battery is installed so that the terminals are on the inside of the engine bay (top post)
                  http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel
                  StudeRich
                  Studebakers Northwest
                  Ferndale, WA
                  StudeRich
                  Second Generation Stude Driver,
                  Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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                  • #10
                    You are right Rich, the way you describe it is the way it's supposed to be. If the battery cables are missing it actually looks like the other way makes more sense, but the positive terminal can hit the hood if you have a thick clamp and that's bad. I was trying to describe it the right way and got mixed up somewhere.

                    nate

                    --
                    55 Commander Starlight
                    http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel
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                    55 Commander Starlight
                    http://members.cox.net/njnagel

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                    • #11
                      In defense of 64stud, if he's young (compared to many of us), he can be a very competent mechanic but not know any more about a car built 20 years before he was born than some of us might know about a multi-port fuel injected, varible cam timing, real time computer controlled car build 50 years after we were born. In fact, there's a better chance he knows less through no fault of his own. How many of us would know how to start up a steam locomotive that had been setting in the back yard for a few years?

                      Well 64stud, your car is 12 volt negative ground like the new ones are. As mentioned, remove the plugs, squirt a little oil in the cylinders (maybe a teaspoon, too much and you'll have the plugs fouled), crank it over and replace with new plugs. I'd sure change the engine oil, any modern oil will be fine for the time being, clean the points (file and drag paper through them) or better yet put on new ones and gap them .016-.020 with a CLEAN feeler gauge (no oil at all) and to save some possible work, pour a little gas into the carb (1-2 ounces) and crank it over. The carb may be gunked up and need to be cleaned but then again, Studes have been know to set around for ages and fire up and run fine. Oh yes, the suggestion of spinning the oil pump is very sound advice. If the car has power brakes, there'll be a big ugly cylindrical object on the left firewall. There'll be a vacuum hose going to it and brake lines to the master cylinder that is located on the frame rail under the floor (power brake or not). You'll have to pull back the carpet to get to the access hole and a 1 1/8" (I think) socket to remove the cap. Use the common old style non-silicone based brake fluid.

                      Regardless of what has been said, don't be afraid to ask questions regarding this old car. Besides, some of us may have to ask you a question about something a little more modern some day.

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                      • #12
                        John, I could be wrong on this, buuuuut... Isn't the MC on a 64 Hawk on the firewall? In fact, wasn't that the standard (suspended pedals) after '62? That's what the Shop Manual says, at least?

                        This is one of the changes that one can expect Sean. '64 was the last year of production for the Hawk. It's a beautiful car and at the height of it's development. I hope your friends/relatives have taken care of it.

                        VERY IMPORTANT! You really need those manuals. There are some things that are unique to Studebakers you need to know. Keep in mind, these are considerably simpler engines than what is put out now. Much fewer electronics, actually... none. The vaccum system is simpler as well. It's not a Ford or Chevy, don't treat it like one. Keep all that in mind, and I think you'll really like this car. Studebakers are fun to tinker with, and a Hawk was top of the line.



                        Lotsa Larks!
                        K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                        Ron Smith
                        Home of the famous Mr. Ed!
                        K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
                        Ron Smith
                        Where the heck is Fawn Lodge, CA?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          I have to respectfully disagree with studeclunker saying C&K pedals were suspended after 62, they always remained through the floor until the end of production.
                          Frank van Doorn
                          Omaha, Ne.
                          1962 GT Hawk 289 4 speed
                          1941 Champion streetrod, R-2 Powered, GM 200-4R trans.
                          1952 V-8 232 Commander State "Starliner" hardtop OD

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                          • #14
                            quote:Originally posted by 41 Frank

                            I have to respectfully disagree with studeclunker saying C&K pedals were suspended after 62, they always remained through the floor until the end of production.
                            Lark models went to suspended pedals in 1961 and used them until the end. Avantis also always used the suspended pedal setup. 8E Champs went to suspended pedals ('63 and '64). Hawks continued using the '30s version under floor master cylinder.

                            [img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/64%20Daytona%20Convertible/Copy%20of%20DaytonaConvert7-20-06.JPG[/img=right]

                            Paul Johnson
                            '53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
                            '64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
                            '64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
                            Museum R-4 engine
                            Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
                            '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

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                            • #15
                              And the under floor MC always gave better pedal feel esp. on manual brake models.

                              nate

                              (partial to Porsches with bottom-swung pedals as well)

                              --
                              55 Commander Starlight
                              http://home.comcast.net/~njnagel
                              --
                              55 Commander Starlight
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