Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

thick or thin head gaskets?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • thick or thin head gaskets?

    I'm going to be doing a valve job on my 60 Hawk. The engine is stock as far as I know, except for a Pertronix kit. My questions are:
    1. How much do the thicker head gaskets change the compression ratio?
    2. Would the lower compression ratio be beneficial with today's 87 octane regular unleaded fuel?
    Thanks, Mike

  • #2


    1. About a half a point.

    2. Yes. But I'd use at least 89 anyway. BP
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

    Comment


    • #3
      1. Like Bob says...just under a half a point loss in compression.
      2. If it ran well on 89 octaine gas before, with the steel shim gasket, I would put that type back in.

      You'll be happier with the overall outcome....
      A little more (as original) compression - a good thing
      a little better gas - a good thing
      Fresh valve grind (clean, well sealed valves) - a good thing

      Mike

      Comment


      • #4
        Thanks for the input guys. Unfortunately, in my area (southeast So. Dak.), 89 octane is only available as a 10% ethanol blend and 92 octane is pretty much a thing of the past. Do those octane boosters work?
        Mike

        Comment


        • #5
          quote:Originally posted by Mr Mike

          Thanks for the input guys. Unfortunately, in my area (southeast So. Dak.), 89 octane is only available as a 10% ethanol blend and 92 octane is pretty much a thing of the past. Do those octane boosters work?
          Mike
          In many areas you can not get any gasoline that is not at least 10% alcohol. This is okay, as long as you have changed the rubber/neoprene parts of your fuel system to modern materials, which you should do anyway.

          Gary L.
          Wappinger, NY

          SDC member since 1968
          Studebaker enthusiast much longer
          Gary L.
          Wappinger, NY

          SDC member since 1968
          Studebaker enthusiast much longer

          Comment


          • #6

            FWIW, most Studebaker V8s other than R-series, had compression ratios in the 7.5-to-8.5 range and will run fine on anything out of the pump IF the ignition is properly set for initial and total advance.

            In the metro areas of Washington state, we have had 10% ethanol in our 87, 89 and 91-octane fuels for a long time now. I have run my completely stock '55 E12 with the 224" V8 for many years with no problems. The ethanol does not have as much energy as gasoline, so it reduces fuel mileage by about 5%.


            thnx, jack vines

            PackardV8
            PackardV8

            Comment


            • #7
              Like Gary and Jack note...and again...the thin gasket and 89 oct. gas.
              10% ethanol....most people don't even notice...neither will your engine.

              Mike

              P.s. - the more ethanol...the more compression that's required to make up for the lost power in the fuel.

              Note - an alcohol burning, supercharged, 500 inch Hemi runs in the 13 to 1 range for compression.
              By comparison, the same engine on race gas...will need to run in the 6 or 7 to 1 compression ratio.

              Comment


              • #8
                I bought a car which had thin gaskets.
                It leaked water into one of the cylinders.
                It ruined an otherwise low mileage engine.
                If you are going that route be careful to seal it well.

                Comment


                • #9
                  quote:Originally posted by pszikszai

                  I bought a car which had thin gaskets.
                  It leaked water into one of the cylinders.
                  It ruined an otherwise low mileage engine.
                  If you are going that route be careful to seal it well.
                  Maybe the gaskets had been installed without using a gasket sealer (like copper). My dad used to just use ordinary paint as a head gasket sealer.


                  Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia
                  '53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
                  '64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
                  '64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
                  Museum R-4 engine
                  1962 Gravely Model L (Studebaker-Packard serial plate)
                  1972 Gravely Model 430 (Studebaker name plate, Studebaker Onan engine)
                  Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
                  '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X