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Installing T-5; Need Bell Housing

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  • Installing T-5; Need Bell Housing

    Hello Everybody,
    I am installing a T-5 Transmission into my 1962 Hawk. I have the T-5 (sitting in my living room) and Dan Giblin's adapter kit.
    So, I got kit and Transmission. Now I need a bellhousing from any late model studebaker v8 with the tall bolt pattern.
    -
    The motor still has the bell housing from the automatic attached.
    I looked at the mounts and it appears that the bell housing is mounted to the frame and to remove it I will need to support the motor with blocks of wood?
    -
    The fellow that built the transmission also had a Hurst shifter. Any have any advice on what shifter looks the most stock?
    -
    PS Anybody need a Stude 3 speed transmission?

    Tony in Austin

  • #2
    The bell-housing from the 3-speed should be the one you want....
    It's a common BH from ALMOST all V8 cars with 3-sp, 3/OD and 4-sp.
    No matter what BH you end up with- be SURE to dial-indicate it to the new motor...

    To remove the trans/BH, you need to support the engine as far back as possible. I never liked jacking up on a Stude oil-pan, so I made a "saddle" out of angle-iron and steel plate- that supports the oil-pan at the flange where it bolts to the block.

    Use the Hurst- but cut the handle just above the mount- Cut your factory handle just above the cast "slot". (see pic) Grind it down to match and weld that to the Hurst Mount... no one will ever know you have a Hurst...



    PS: Keep a very large long Craftsman Slotted Screwdriver with you... in case your weld fails
    BTDT.... LOL!!!! (but it took 7-years)


    Specializing in Studebaker Restoration
    Ray

    www.raylinrestoration.com
    Specializing in Studebaker Restoration

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    • #3
      tony_n_austin says:

      quote:I need a bellhousing from any late model studebaker v8 with the tall bolt pattern
      studeman says:
      quote:
      The bell-housing from the 3-speed should be the one you want....
      It's a common BH from ALMOST all V8 cars with 3-sp, 3/OD and 4-sp.
      FWIW, there are at least six different V8 bellhousings. The most common bell housing is probably the '51-56 V8 with a square bolt pattern for their T86s. The tall or Ford bolt pattern is post-56, used with the T85, T86 and T10. Unless, of course, it is a '61-early 62 with the Chevy pattern T10, or a truck V8 with a 4-speed or a 5-speed.

      PackardV8
      PackardV8

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      • #4
        tony,

        I ASSume you know that you will also need a flywheel, clutch, and clutch linkage as well... and something you may not have thought about, the longer flywheel bolts. You'll probably be better served pulling the engine/trans assembly, separating, and then working on the engine on a stand because you'll have to drop the pan to replace the flywheel bolts.

        nate

        --
        55 Commander Starlight
        http://members.cox.net/njnagel
        --
        55 Commander Starlight
        http://members.cox.net/njnagel

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        • #5
          Yes, exactly what Nate said. You'll be doing yourself a HUGE favor by having the engine on a bench or even on the floor to do all that is necessary to get this thing done right.
          ( or done at all, for that matter ) Trying to do this in the car will make you insane. I have all the parts you need, but I am in California. Shipping would be crazy. Look to your local Stude club members to gather the parts you need locally. You'll make contacts, friends, and will probably score some of the stuff for free in the process. The parts you are looking for are quite common and should not cost too much. Bellhousing $50,... flywheel $20,... flywheel bolts $10,... clutch and pressure plate buy new at your local auto parts store,... Don't go nuts on paying too much cuz it will take the fun and joy out of what should be a great project. Good luck.

          sals54
          sals54

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          • #6
            OR, you could make an engine cradle from three pieces of construction 2X12 cutoffs, screwed together with wallboard screws! It will also save crushing the oil pan.

            StudeRich
            Studebakers Northwest
            Ferndale, WA
            StudeRich
            Second Generation Stude Driver,
            Proud '54 Starliner Owner

            Comment


            • #7
              I can build a cradle. One of the Studebaker manuals has picture of one; I think they use to make/sell them.
              I really do not have the physical room to pull the motor. By itself the car fills up my garage. With over flow going up the stairs and into the dining room, out the living room, and into the second bedroom.
              I may have to find some place to have it towed to work on this part of the puzzle. If I pull the motor I may as well have a pro check it out for any rebuild or reseals that need to be done. And paint the block.

              Tony in Austin

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              • #8
                Replaced the automatic in my 58 Packard hawk with a T-86w OD from a 56 stude V8 in 1966. Purchased the P hawk as a basket case and fixed it to be a second car. I changed the flywheel bolts with the car in the driveway by removing the oil pan. Then put the pan back on with new gasket and rear seal. Also had to install a frame cross member to hold the carrier bearing for the two piece driveshaft. The task is doable with out pulling the engine. Since then I have seen an installation of a flywheel on a stude V8 using the short automatic transmission bolts by drilling a clearance space on each flywheel bolt hole with a large drill bit sharpened to have flat cutting edges and a guide point that fits the original holes.

                58LS Since 1966

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                • #9
                  Will counter boring the bolt holes large enough for the nuts not weaken the flywheel hub?


                  1952 Champion Starlight, 1962 Daytona, both w/overdrive.Searcy,Arkansas
                  "I may be lazy, but I'm not shiftless."
                  "In the heart of Arkansas."
                  Searcy, Arkansas
                  1952 Commander 2 door. Really fine 259.
                  1952 2R pickup

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                  • #10
                    I saw this done by a mechanic at a salvage yard shop about 25 years ago when a 289 engine from a salvage car was put in as replacement in a V8 Stude pickup. The pickup was used as a daily driver for several years after the installation. Don't know any other info.

                    58LS Since 1966

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                    • #11
                      Before I would consider boring the holes in the flywheel I would see if you could tap the holes in the crank flange for the next size larger cap screw and simply bolt the flywheel to the crank that way. It's still not the factory-approved method, but would make me less nervous.

                      nate

                      --
                      55 Commander Starlight
                      http://members.cox.net/njnagel
                      --
                      55 Commander Starlight
                      http://members.cox.net/njnagel

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