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  • StudeMann
    replied
    Rich,

    I was aware that my post was not directly relevant to the discussion except to clarify that the fuel pumps for both 6 and 8 were AC in 51 since Grandpa Stude was talking about a 51 pickup. N8N had suggested the V8 pumps were Carter pumps and I was trying to clarify that in 51 they were both AC pumps.

    It's not often that I have something to add to the forum other than another request for help so I was happy to throw in my 2 cents worth. With the exchange on the dollar I guess it's worth about 1.8 cents right now.

    "Ahh, a bear in his natural habitat...a Studebaker!"
    Fozzie Bear in 'The Muppet Movie'

    51 Land Cruiser (Elsie)
    Jim Mann
    Victoria, B.C.
    Canada

    Leave a comment:


  • Johnnywiffer
    replied
    BIIIIIG Oops!

    John

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  • StudeRich
    replied
    Jim Mann and Johnnywiffer; you two guys do know that your situation differs completely (apples/oranges) RIGHT?

    We were talking 6 cyl. currently it's '55-'64 V-8, but you guys have '51-'54 completely different, and no noted problems with those top mounted pumps, only their poor location for vapor locking.

    StudeRich
    Studebakers Northwest
    Ferndale, WA

    Leave a comment:


  • Johnnywiffer
    replied
    When I installed the pump in the blue LC in the July TW (Cars In My Driveway) that had sat for 13 years, I used a pump I had bought MAAAANY years ago at a swap meet.

    Once I had corrected MY faux pas (the glass bowl), it worked perfectly. Frankly, I HAD a hard time believing it. I thot the diaphragm or valves or SOMETHING would not have worked. But it did--and DOES! But R&R-ing that sucker was more fun(!) than I want to have again for a VERRRY long time.

    John

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  • rkapteyn
    replied
    There was a long discussion on Studebaker"V8" fuelpumps on ALT Autos


    http://groups.google.com/group/alt.a...c20a9c8fd96e0c

    Leave a comment:


  • rkapteyn
    replied
    The problem with the V8 replacement fuel pumps you get from various vendors is that they are Chrysler 318 pumps.
    They work on Studebaker V8's sometimes but do not pump enough gas for hard driving.
    If the pump you have has a straight arm out with one bend near the end you have a Chrysler 318 pump.
    Depending on manufacturing tolerances it may pump enough fuel for normal driving.
    The problem is that the Studebaker "V8" actuating cam on the camshaft does not make the pump work a complete stroke.
    These pumps are made by Master or Airtex and are not designed for the Stude "V8".
    These pumps are also a problem because their crankcase seal leaks and oil leaks from the vent hole and the actuating level pin works it way out after a short time.
    The original Carter pumps had a bend arm ("S" shaped?") and have "CARTER" on them.

    Rebuilt kits are available but are very difficult to install due to the redesigned vertical shaft seal.
    The kits have diaphragms that are resistant to the new fuel additives that eat up the rubber parts in your fuel system.
    I believe in 1956 Studebaker also used AC Delco pumps on their "V8" with a "S" shaped arm. Not sure.
    Bob Kapteyn

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  • TMAN0950
    replied
    I replaced the fuel pump on my 1959 V8 because I didn't know how old it was. I got the new one at a good auto parts store and installed, it would not pump a drop of gas, I reinstalled the old one and it is still working fine.

    Leave a comment:


  • StudeMann
    replied
    [quote]Originally posted by N8N

    AC is factory for a six, I believe. V-8s got Carter pumps.

    nate

    Nate,

    In 51 both the 6 and V8 used the AC pump. However, the lever was different because the 6 ran on the cam and the V8 was actuated by a rod in the oil filler tower off the top of the cam. Also, the pump cover was mounted at a different angle relative to the body because they were mounted on different sides of the engines. I used to have a 51 Champion Starlite Coupe and now I have a 51 Land Cruiser so I've seen both. I have the 51 Passenger Car Shop Manual as well.

    Maybe the trucks are different however.
    .

    "Ahh, a bear in his natural habitat...a Studebaker!"
    Fozzie Bear in 'The Muppet Movie'

    51 Land Cruiser (Elsie)
    Jim Mann
    Victoria, B.C.
    Canada

    Leave a comment:


  • BobGlasscock
    replied
    Ok, I just had a thought about a bench test. With the pump off the block, measure the minimum and maximum distance from the surface of the block to the surface of the cam shaft through one entire rotation of the cam. Then position the lever from the face of the pump to the far edge of the lever at the maximum distance and move it to the minimum distance and see what the vacuum does for moving a volume of liquid.

    '50 Champion, 1 family owner

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  • BobGlasscock
    replied
    I tried to refrain, but I can't help myself. I am very unsure of being able to find the right words to describe what I see easily in my head and have read warnings about concerning mechanical fuel pumps.

    If the levers are not at the engineered angle when applied to the engine block, which is a result of installing the pump in which the lever is pivoted, the pump diaphram will not operate properly. Try to picture this. Lever A rides the cam and its stroke is from (referencing clock numbers on the face of a clock) 1 to 3 and back. The diaphram is moved less than the necessary billow to move X amount of gas. Lever B rides the cam and its stroke is from 12:30 to 1:30 and the result is still the same, too little vacuum to move the required amount of gas. The proper factory lever moves from 1 to 4 and moves the correct amount of gas.

    A vacuum test proves nothing about if the movement range of the lever moves the diaphram the correct distance to produce the correct vacuum to move the gas. It just proves the amount of vacuum in a bench, manual test. And all of the examples ya'll have given all state that the levers are different, therefore the vacuum production has to be different if different levers are applied to the same cam and held at the same angle by the same engine block.



    '50 Champion, 1 family owner

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  • glen
    replied
    Could be......but then I'm not the mechanic in the family.

    glen
    Nowhere, AZ
    "Freedom Through Vigilance"

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  • showbizkid
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by glen

    Clark, I looked at 1 of last years posts....I called it a pressure
    test....the term that was used was: "vacuum test"....still for the
    life of me, I can't remember how they had set it up in the shop.
    Could it be as simple as hooking up a vacuum gauge to the inlet and actuating the arm?


    [img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

    Clark in San Diego
    '63 F2/Lark Standard
    http://studeblogger.blogspot.com
    www.studebakersandiego.com

    Leave a comment:


  • showbizkid
    replied
    quote:Originally posted by 55Prez

    Did you get my email?
    Just did, and a reply is on its way back.


    [img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

    Clark in San Diego
    '63 F2/Lark Standard
    http://studeblogger.blogspot.com
    www.studebakersandiego.com

    Leave a comment:


  • glen
    replied
    Clark, I looked at 1 of last years posts....I called it a pressure
    test....the term that was used was: "vacuum test"....still for the
    life of me, I can't remember how they had set it up in the shop.



    glen
    Nowhere, AZ
    "Freedom Through Vigilance"

    Leave a comment:


  • 64V-K7
    replied

    Attn: showbizkid
    Did you get my email?

    Bob Johnstone

    http://www.studebaker-info.org
    55 President State Sedan
    64 GT Hawk
    70 Avanti (R3)

    Leave a comment:

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