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How do you get spring bushings out?

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  • How do you get spring bushings out?

    I think this might have been discussed before, but I couldn't find it. Before installing the S-10 rear end in my 52 Commander, I was just going to replace the rear spring bushings. Well, I couldn't even get the bolts out. I didn't have time to keep trying so I just installed the rear, but at some point, I need to change those bushings. Is there an easy way?

    Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/

  • #2
    Leonard, check out this page:

    http://www.studebaker-info.org/rearbush.html

    It's devoted to nothing but removing those bushings! Just be patient


    [img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

    Clark in San Diego
    '63 F2/Lark Standard
    http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

    Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

    Comment


    • #3
      Thanks for the info, Clark, but I asked for an EASY way! Just kidding!

      Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/

      Comment


      • #4
        Harbor freight sell a tool to press out the old bushings and press in the new ones.It is of course "imported" but for the little you are likely to use it,it will be money well spent!

        '64 R2 back on da road again
        POCI,SCCA,SIMTA
        '64 R2 back on da road again

        Comment


        • #5
          quote:Originally posted by lstude

          Thanks for the info, Clark, but I asked for an EASY way! Just kidding!
          Leonard,
          You have asked the wrong question. There is NO easy way. I recently took two days (and five Sawz-All blades) just to change the lower rear bushings.

          [img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/64%20Daytona%20Convertible/Copy%20of%20DaytonaConvert7-20-06.JPG[/img=right]

          Paul Johnson
          '53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
          '64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
          '64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
          Museum R-4 engine
          Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
          '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

          Comment


          • #6
            I'll second the opinion that there is no easy way. I tried the "pull it out with threaded rod" technique - no go! You probably need to use an air chisel to split the bushing shells and drive them out - after you melt out the rubber with a propane torch. Of course, you need to remove the fuel tank to do this - and the rubber will burn, so have some water and a sponge handy! A previous post on the forum here suggested [u]tightening</u> the shackle bolts first to break the rust bond between the bolts and the inner sleeves. Even if you get the bolts and the rubber out, the outer sleeves are probably stuck by rust. You need to cut through the sleeve to release the pressure, then drive them out with the air chisel. Be prepared for hours of nasty work. Coat the new outer bushing shells with copper grease before you pull them in with the threaded rod technique.

            [img=left]http://www.studegarage.com/images/gary_ash_m5_sm.jpg[/img=left] Gary Ash
            Dartmouth, Mass.
            '48 M5
            '65 Wagonaire Commander
            '63 Wagonaire Standard
            web site at http://www.studegarage.com
            Gary Ash
            Dartmouth, Mass.

            '32 Indy car replica (in progress)
            ’41 Commander Land Cruiser
            '48 M5
            '65 Wagonaire Commander
            '63 Wagonaire Standard
            web site at http://www.studegarage.com

            Comment


            • #7
              I did the threaded rod, nuts, washers, sockets of various sizes and
              it was a real pain. The worst is the ones in the frame because the
              body gets in the way of the threaded rod. Putting the new ones in
              was a piece of cake.

              Just don't give up once you start.

              Comment


              • #8
                Thanks for all the help guys! At least I know what I am getting myself into!

                Leonard Shepherd, editor, The Commanding Leader, Central Virginia Chapter, http://centralvirginiachapter.org/

                Comment


                • #9
                  The upper ones in the frame have proven to be a real pain for me. I have used a quick release skewer from a bicycle along with various washers, and sockets, to pull the old ones out. The quick releases can be had pretty cheap, and exert a tremendous amount of force, abate only 1/8" at a time.

                  Ross.
                  Riverside, Ca.
                  1957 Provincial X2
                  1958 Transtar
                  1963 Lark. F.S.
                  sigpic
                  Ross.
                  Riverside, Ca.
                  1957 Provincial X2
                  1958 Transtar

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Some time back I bought a set of NOS HD rear springs for my Wagonaire. It had the original six-leaf HD springs (aka cop car springs) still on it, but with 130,000 miles and 43 years, I figured they were tired. A couple weeks ago I decided to tackle the replacement job. I put the car on stands, crawled under, put a couple wrenches on the frozen front bolt and decided "not for me"[:I]. So I took the car to a nearby spring shop (in business with the same family ownership since 1945). They changed them for me. I was suprised that the car didn't seem to sit any higher than before and I was surprised how good the old front bushings looked (the rears didn't look so good though.


                    A couple days ago I decided to put new bushings in the old springs so I could put them on my convertible. The original four-leaf springs were obviously sagging. I knid of knew what to expect in getting out the old bushings (from this and other threads and some Bob Johnstone advice). The big bushings weren't too bad. I drilled out the rubber with a 1/4" bit and knocked out the center parts. I then used my Sawzall to cut the outer shell almost to the spring. Then I used a cold chisel to peel them out. The smaller rears were another story. The centers came out easily because because there was little rubber in them. However, I had a heck of a time peeling out the outer shells. I even dulled my cold chisel and sometime I'll learn how to hold a hammer (strong language followed).

                    To install the new bushings I painted the inside of the spring with never-seize then used a combination of 1/2"-drive sockets and a large carpentry clamp to squeeze the bushing in place. For the rears I used a combination of a long carriage bolt, a couple more 1/2" drive sockets and a 9/16" wrench and/or socket.



                    Here are the completed springs.




                    [img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/R-4.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64L.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64P.jpg[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/53K.jpg[/img=right]Paul Johnson
                    '53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
                    '64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
                    '64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
                    Museum R-4 engine
                    Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
                    '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I used the burn out methor on a few of my rigs but I have had to drill the bushings out in the frame and once you do that stock will not fit but then I did not use stock instead I had nylon bushings made so I will not have to ever replace them again.

                      If you car is ugly then it better be fast.....

                      65 2dr sedan
                      64 2dr sedan (Pinkie)
                      61 V8 Tcab
                      61 Tcab 20R powered
                      55 Commander Wagon
                      54 Champion Wagon
                      46 Gibson Model A
                      50 JD MC
                      If you car is ugly then it better be fast.....

                      65 2dr sedan
                      64 2dr sedan (Pinkie)
                      61 V8 Tcab
                      63 Tcab 20R powered
                      55 Commander Wagon
                      54 Champion Wagon
                      46 Gibson Model A
                      50 JD MC
                      45 Agricat
                      67 Triumph T100
                      66 Bultaco Matadore

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Studebaker had a tool to do this, I used on on the frame busings on my 52 ragtop, I did have the rear fenders off when I did it, but with the tool, it was easy. I borrowed the tool but, don't remember who from &lt;G&gt;

                        Jim
                        "We can't all be Heroes, Some us just need to stand on the curb and clap as they go by" Will Rogers

                        We will provide the curb for you to stand on and clap!


                        Indy Honor Flight www.IndyHonorFlight.org

                        As of Veterans Day 2017, IHF has flown 2,450 WWII, Korean, and Vietnam Veterans to Washington DC at NO charge! to see
                        their Memorials!

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                        • #13
                          I have decided that I REALLY hate spring bushings. A few days ago I decided to go ahead and install the six-leaf springs on my convertible. Surprisingly, all the bolts on the old springs came out with no problem. Earlier I had to cut off the bolts on the lower rear bushings when I replaced them, but I guess the others were more protected (plus it was a California car most of its life). Flushed with success I decided to replace the upper rear bushings- BIG MISTAKE. I have decided that you can't get them out without (1) removing the rear fender, or (2) removing the gas tank, or (3) removing both. On the left I burned out the rubber and got the center out ok. I couldn't get a saw in the inside of the outer shell so I tried an air chisel- no joy, just chewed up the entire area because I just couldn't get a straight shot at it. I tried a cold chisel- same result. I bought a new die grinder a real Dremel (my Harbor Freight special started spitting pieces out the vents the third time I used it). I wanted to use router bits to notch the shell so I could peel it out. I just broke my bits. Then I tried pulling it from the inside using a 16 mm socket as the driver and a 1/2" bolt as the puller. I turned the nut with a breaker bar and found why they call them breaker bars- the 1/2" bolt sheared. So, the car is sitting down in my barn on jack stands. I don't have time to drop the tank before this weekend when I am leading a Fall Tour, so I guess I'll be driving the Brand "A"[V][V].

                          [img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/R-4.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64L.JPG[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/64P.jpg[/img=right][img=right]http://www.frontiernet.net/~thejohnsons/Forum%20signature%20pix/53K.jpg[/img=right]Paul Johnson
                          '53 Commander Starliner (since 1966)
                          '64 Daytona Wagonaire (original owner)
                          '64 Daytona Convertible (2006)
                          Museum R-4 engine
                          Paul Johnson, Wild and Wonderful West Virginia.
                          '64 Daytona Wagonaire, '64 Avanti R-1, Museum R-4 engine, '72 Gravely Model 430 with Onan engine

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I guess I should feel fortunate! After my Hawk sat in a Montana wheat field for 35 years I had mine changed out in an easy afternoon using the directions supplied by studebakerparts.com.

                            Wayen K.
                            Libby, MT
                            61 Hawk (Project)
                            48 Diamond T 306H (Waiting)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              With the smaller bushings, I'm wondering what would happen if you ran a coarse-thread tap through the bushing, a tap whose major diameter was JUST less than the O.D. of the bushing?

                              If you were able to cut a thread in the bushing shell, you could either screw in a bolt of the right size and use that to pull the bushing, or else simply grab an end, and peel it out spiral fashion. It's something I will have to try when I get home.

                              Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
                              Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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