Announcement

Collapse

Get more Tips, Specs and Technical Data!

Did you know... this Forum is a service of the Studebaker Drivers Club? For more technical tips, specifications, history and tech data, visit the Tech Tips page at the SDC Homepage: www.studebakerdriversclub.com/tips.asp
See more
See less

Sliding Truck Seat - any advantage?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Sliding Truck Seat - any advantage?

    My truck has the standard seat - mounts on pegs on the bottom, and the top of the seat back is hinged to the back wall of the cab. No way to utilize the space behind the seat (my short legs require moving the seat all the way forward, so there is some space behind that I wish I could use).

    Now, for those who have the optional sliding seats, would you say it would be worthwhile for me to obtain one (or just the frame, to which I can attach my seat back and bottom) so that I could actually store stuff behind the seat? Would it seem worthwhile if it were you?

    Thanks

    [img=left]http://rocketdillo.com/studebaker/misc/images/Current_Avacar.gif[/img=left] - DilloCrafter

    1955 1/2 Ton Pickup
    The Red-Headed Amazon
    Deep in the heart of Texas

    Paul Simpson
    "DilloCrafter"

    1955 1/2 Ton Pickup
    The Red-Headed Amazon
    Deep in the heart of Texas

  • #2
    Paul,

    Personally if I had a slider available, I would go with it. Much easier to adjust and you could potentilly get something behine the seat.

    Gary


    Guido Salvage - "Where rust is beautiful"

    Studebaker horse drawn buggy; 1946 M-16 fire truck; 1948 M-16 grain truck; 1949 2R16A grain truck; 1949 2R17A fire truck; 1950 2R5 pickup; 1952 2R17A grain truck; 1952 Packard 200 4 door; 1955 E-38 grain truck; 1957 3E-40 flatbed; 1961 6E-28 grain truck; 1962 7E-13D 4x4 rack truck; 1962 7E-7 Champ pickup; 1962 GT Hawk 4 speed; 1963 8E-28 flatbed; 1964 Avanti R2 4 speed; 1964 Cruiser and various other "treasures".

    Hiding and preserving Studebakers in Richmond, Goochland & Louisa, Va.
    Join me in removing narcissists, trolls, self annoited "experts" and general idiots via the Ignore button.

    The official SDC Forum heel nipper ���

    �Middle age is when your broad mind and narrow waist begin to change places.� E. Joseph Cossman

    For every mile of road, there are 2 miles of ditch. ���

    "All lies matter - fight the kleptocracy"

    Comment


    • #3
      Much more comfortable seat, although you will probably still wish the seat back folded forward. Back in the '70s I had a '58 that someone had cut and hinged the tube frame.
      There is a service bulletin with instructions for replacing the peg seat with the slider. Not really a drilling template, because that's pretty obvious. It does stress that you should slide the two rails all the way forward and position the back rest all the way back before drilling any holes. Then drill just the center hole on each side and test seat operation. Elongate holes if needed for final positioning, then drill all the other holes. A total of ten holes.

      [img] http://home.comcast.net/~jdwain/53C.jpg [/img]
      Dwain G.

      Comment


      • #4
        Well, only ever having had the slider seat setup, I can't see that it's any great advantage. Unless you're a pipsqueak, you're gonna shove the seat back as far as it will go. Then what?

        BTW, I've still got an optional "Lever-vent" lower cushion if anyone wants it.

        Miscreant adrift in
        the BerStuda Triangle!!

        1957 Transtar 1/2ton
        1960 Larkvertible V8
        1958 Provincial wagon
        1953 Commander coupe
        No deceptive flags to prove I'm patriotic - no biblical BS to impress - just ME and Studebakers - as it should be.

        Comment


        • #5
          Yes, seat cushion and back rest are different from the peg seat. Also, after about 1957 the seats were foam rubber padded.

          [img] http://home.comcast.net/~jdwain/53C.jpg [/img]
          Dwain G.

          Comment


          • #6
            quote:Originally posted by Mr.Biggs

            Well, only ever having had the slider seat setup, I can't see that it's any great advantage. Unless you're a pipsqueak, you're gonna shove the seat back as far as it will go. Then what?

            BTW, I've still got an optional "Lever-vent" lower cushion if anyone wants it.
            Well thanks, Bob, I guess I'm a pipsqueak then! Or maybe as someone said, I'm just the right size for a C-cab, since guys were generally not as tall in 1948 when the thing was designed. But I do have my seat all the way forward on that peg.

            And Dwain, thanks for that service bulletin info. That will come in handy if I get around to this change.

            By the way, does anyone know if my standard cushions will attach to a sliding seat frame, or do I need to buy an entire sliding seat, cushions and all?

            [img=left]http://rocketdillo.com/studebaker/misc/images/Current_Avacar.gif[/img=left] - DilloCrafter

            1955 1/2 Ton Pickup
            The Red-Headed Amazon
            Deep in the heart of Texas

            Paul Simpson
            "DilloCrafter"

            1955 1/2 Ton Pickup
            The Red-Headed Amazon
            Deep in the heart of Texas

            Comment


            • #7
              Dillo the slider seat back in my 5E13 and 8E28 have clips or hooks that hold the upper part of the back cushion to the seat frame. The bottom kinda wedges against the bottom seat cushion.

              3E38
              4E2
              4E28
              5E13
              7E7
              8E7
              8E12
              8E28
              4E2
              59 Lark
              etc

              Comment


              • #8
                A friend of mine with a pick up replaced the fixed seat in the truck with a front seat that folds forward from a 2 door sedan. That way, the space behind is accessible, and you are not fiddling with an entire sliding seat assembly. Apparently, it was a bolt-in, no new holes, job.

                Paul

                Comment


                • #9
                  FWIW, the Studebaker R-series truck was designed in the late 30s-early 40s when average men were 5'6" and under than today's 5'9' and taller.

                  My grandfather and my father were tall, as am I. The seats of our six or so Studebaker pickups have always been hard against the back of the cab and we have always wished for another few inches of leg and head room.

                  thnx, jv



                  PackardV8
                  PackardV8

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    quote:Originally posted by PackardV8

                    FWIW, the Studebaker R-series truck was designed in the late 30s-early 40s when average men were 5'6" and under than today's 5'9' and taller.

                    My grandfather and my father were tall, as am I. The seats of our six or so Studebaker pickups have always been hard against the back of the cab and we have always wished for another few inches of leg and head room.

                    thnx, jv

                    PackardV8


                    The R and 2R series trucks were designed by Bob Bourke in the late '40s (not, "late 30s - early '40s") and the 2R came out in 1948 as a 1949 model. Remember that trucks were used as work vehicles then and not as passenger cruisers as trucks are now used. I am 5'10" and have owned a few of these trucks and driven many. I do not have a problem with the space.

                    Some people, especially youth, now seem to like to drive with the seat far back. Just last weekend, we went to a place that had valet parking. I convinced the valet to not move my car to an off-site lot. He parked it a few car lengths away on the driveway. The valet was about the same height as I am. When I returned and got into my car, I could only reach the throttle with the tip of my toe. The seat had been moved back several inches. By pushing the memory button the seat returned to a location where my foot rested evenly on the throttle.





                    Gary L.
                    Wappinger, NY

                    1959 DeLuxe pickup (restomod)
                    Gary L.
                    Wappinger, NY

                    SDC member since 1968
                    Studebaker enthusiast much longer

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Well, PackardV8, I guess I appreciate your FWIW. But, as I've mentioned in this thread, I sit with the seat in its forwardmost position, because I am one of those 5'6" guys that this truck was designed for.

                      Soooooo, my goal is to make use of the space behind where my seat will be. Is it true, then, truck guys who are "in the know", that the seat top and bottom themselves are different between the standard type and the type that fit into the sliding frame? If they are the same, I should be able to obtain a sliding frame, and work out a few things to make my seat back and bottom fit into it, correct?

                      Or are they truly such different seat parts (between the standard seat and the optional sliding seat) that I will need an entire sliding seat assembly, frame, back and bottom?

                      I do appreciate all the answers so far.

                      [img=left]http://rocketdillo.com/studebaker/misc/images/Current_Avacar.gif[/img=left] - DilloCrafter

                      1955 1/2 Ton Pickup
                      The Red-Headed Amazon
                      Deep in the heart of Texas

                      Paul Simpson
                      "DilloCrafter"

                      1955 1/2 Ton Pickup
                      The Red-Headed Amazon
                      Deep in the heart of Texas

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hi, Studegary,

                        For clarification, I went back to read Bob Bourke's book again and he mentions several times his basic work on the '47 Studebaker car design was actually begun in '40-41. However, the chapter on the trucks has no quotes from Bourke, nothing about when design work was begun and shows no pre-production sketches. Had to be no later than early-to-mid 1940s to get it into production by mid-1948.

                        The incorrect reference I made was calling them "R-series." I remind myself the R-series design was never produced and the '49-53 trucks are correctly referred to as 2R-series.

                        thnx, jv.

                        PackardV8
                        PackardV8

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X