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  • Missing?

    My 64 Cruiser runs very well until I get it up to 60 mph and then it seems to start to missing. Can this be a problem of the timing being a little off or maybe the carb needing a little work? If I back the speed down to just under 60 the missing stops. Any ideas?


  • #2
    Most likely ignition related.

    JDP/Maryland
    JDP Maryland

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    • #3
      I say fuel feed. Either restricted flow to carb or dirty carb. I however would eval the points, point setting , timing and card adjustment first, my opinion.

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      • #4
        I think that you have a restricted fuel flow. This can be in a filter, line or tank or the pump may be weak.

        Gary L.
        Wappinger, NY

        SDC member since 1968
        Studebaker enthusiast much longer
        Gary L.
        Wappinger, NY

        SDC member since 1968
        Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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        • #5
          Make sure you check the vent tube on the fuel filler neck. Follow it up, across, and down through the trunk floor in the left rear corner. Outside, under the car is where a "dirt-dobber" (mud wasp) can build a nest inside the tube. The gas cap is NOT vented. Also check the ignition points. It should take a pretty good bit of force to move the contact point arm. If it's real easy to move, the "spring hoop" that belongs under the copper strip out to the terminal screw, could be broken or missing. Those have been known to be missing from inside the box the points came in, or the "installer" did not know how it was to be installed.[B)] Hope this helps. Your shop manual is your friend.[)]

          Dan Miller
          Atlanta, GA

          [img=left]http://static.flickr.com/57/228744729_7aff5f0118_m.jpg[/img=left]
          Road Racers turn left AND right.

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          • #6
            High rpm miss regardless of throttle I would first check ignition points for wide gap or corrosion .

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            • #7
              I had one like that. If I kept pushing it so that it barely missed; eventually it would start running smoothly. It was a bad plug.

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              • #8
                Those original fuel pumps have a paper filter inside the sheetmetal bowl. Regards ignition, don't over look a bad coil.

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                • #9
                  I vote for bad points, or bad point gap. Could be caused by bad coil, burning the points.

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                  • #10
                    Check the lead that feeds the power to the points it moves when vacuum advance operates and can have some broken strands had it happen on a few cars over the years

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                    • #11
                      Ignition and timing is number 1, air second and, fuel third... Me Dad taught me that. Go for a good, clean distributor, harness, and plugs, first. Time it correctly and then move on.

                      I agree, you've got an advance problem.

                      Steve

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                      • #12
                        quote:Originally posted by studecruiser

                        My 64 Cruiser runs very well until I get it up to 60 mph and then it seems to start to missing. Can this be a problem of the timing being a little off or maybe the carb needing a little work? If I back the speed down to just under 60 the missing stops. Any ideas?
                        The higher the speed, Larry, the more demand is placed on the ignition system. If all the normal things check out, consider the pink resistance wire supplying dropped voltage to the coil when the car is running; i.e, not in the START/CRANK mode. That resistance wire can (will) deteriorate and offer too much resistance as it gets old, causing a gradually-increasing miss that can be hard to find.

                        You can jumper across that pink wire (if often looks like kind of a dirty orange by now, due to age) and supply a full 12 volts to the coil for a test run. If a full 12 volts to the coil cures the problem, you'll know it right away. If that proves to be true, install a ballast resistor in the run circuit. Disable (bypass) the original pink ignition wire run circuit.

                        Don't continue running the car on a full 12 volts, though, as it will soon burn up the points. It's designed to start on 12 volts but run on a little over 6. BP
                        We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

                        Ayn Rand:
                        "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

                        G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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                        • #13
                          I removed the distrbutor cap and checked the contact point arm and I can move it very easily - almost no resistance at all. I'll go get a new set of points today and replace it and see if that helps. Thanks all.

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                          • #14
                            BINGO!!!!! Make sure when you get the new points, open the box and make see if the spring tension arm (chrome looking) is in there before you leave the store. It may be installed on the points, then again, mabe not. Hopefully there is instructions, either in the box, or on the box. Hope this helps.

                            Dan Miller
                            Atlanta, GA

                            [img=left]http://static.flickr.com/57/228744729_7aff5f0118_m.jpg[/img=left]
                            Road Racers turn left AND right.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              incorrect voltage will fry the points a lot quicker than that. Look at the pits in the burnt points. If the metal is building up on the stationary point then the voltage is too high, and if it's building on the arm, voltage is too low. But I don't think it's the points. Not that I'm always right. Lord Knows! One time I thought I was wrong, but turned out I was right, so I was wrong then for sure.... I bet two dollars it's a plug.

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