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Some Inconvenient Trim

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  • Some Inconvenient Trim

    Went to the Niftee 50ees car show saturday. Hadn't rained out there in about a month. Naturally, it poured after I showed up. Had quite a bit of water coming out from the dash area.

    I know that it is not the wipers because I have replaced the gaskets and nuts on the wipers. I think it is from the chrome strip that runs underneath the windshield. So, I crawled under the dash, and tried to reach up to the area where this trim is. After electrocuting myself, then I became aware that one should unhook the battery before going up there. I tried to reach this trim and cannot get to it. Without pulling the dash, is there any way to get to these three trim pieces? The car is a 62 GT, with airconditioning.
    Thanks in advance.

  • #2
    Find a skinny kid with long arms. [)]

    It's tough to remove with the dash in place. I don't want to think about it with AC, too. [xx(]

    Matthew Burnette
    Hazlehurst, GA


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    • #3
      Looks like my daughter will be pressed into service. I doubt that she will be too thrilled about this, maybe she can consider this an early Father's Day present.

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      • #4
        I've done that with my son




        [img=left]http://members.cox.net/clarknovak/lark.gif[/img=left]

        Clark in San Diego
        '63 F2/Lark Standard
        http://studeblogger.blogspot.com
        www.studebakersandiego.com

        Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

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        • #5
          My personel method for working under the dash is to remove the seat. Thus allowing laying down with the neck not bent also blood not going to head a lot more comfortable than with seat holding up legs and bending back ( on personel note old necks and backs due not bend and flex well). If you can see and be comfortable or as comfortable as possible looking for problem is a lot more enjoyable. Removing the seat not that big of a job and to avoid the neck discomfort worth the trade off in my opion .

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          • #6
            There is supposed to be a foamy-rubber gasket around the Cowl Belt Molding attaching studs. This often deteriorates, and often isn't replaced. I use a foam called Armaflex, but you can use weatherseal for sealing home doors and windows (sticky tape on one side)It's also used to seal truck camper-shells to the bed. Attach it to the molding- not the paint on the car. It will take (2) layers

            On a GT, there is (1) post very close to the wiper stands that hold the (2) corner pieces of molding. You usually have to "park" the wipers in a VERTICLE position, to provide more access to the special deep PAL-NUT on the Stud (you will need a SHORT 3/8" open end wrench). I do this by turning the key and wiper-switch on, and touching the ground wire back to the battery until the wipers stand straight up.

            Once the (2) Pal-Nuts are removed, there are tiny phillips SCREWS on the end of each molding INSIDE the door jamb. Sometimes you must move the weatherstrip out of the way to see it.

            The CENTER portion of the belt molding SHOULD be pushed through large "BARREL-NUTS". However, I have seen cars where they have replaced the barrel-nits with regular nuts/washers. This is OK to do- if done correctly. You MUST be SURE that there are barrel nuts.... before you go trying to lift the molding off. I usually try to PUSH the studs back through from underneath a bit- then tape off the molding edges, get under it with a large flat screwdriver, and pull up at each stud a little at a time (have someone hold the molding while you PULL up.. do NOT pry against the body/paint.

            Here are the hole locations for the belt moldings:


            Good luck...
            Ray


            Specializing in Studebaker Restoration
            Ray

            www.raylinrestoration.com
            Specializing in Studebaker Restoration

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            • #7
              Thanks Ray,

              I figured out about the wipers. I do not have to save the old trim. It is in pretty bad shape anyway (A PO had attached the trim with screws thru the trim). Looking at the new trim, the center section seems to have 4 studs and nuts. A barrel-nut would be great. Are the studs pushed thru the barrel-nuts? I have found a substitute for the foam washers.... comode tank washers fit great. Readily available from Home Depot or such.

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              • #8
                At some point they must have changed how these attach. My '53 had "C" shaped retainers under the dash along with nuts and lockwashers! The studs in the trim went through the holes as shown with the foam rubber washers squished between. Then the C shaped parts went on over the studs under the dash and held tight with the nuts and lock washers. I pulled the center trim off a '61 hawk to use on my '53 and it had those barrel nuts as mentioned. Trim itself and the studs were the same as the '53. I HAVE seen warped trim from where the nuts were overtightened and pulled the trim down to the body so tight it pulled dents in it! The C shaped things were even bent down too. Maybe that is the reason Studebaker stopped doing it that way as well as labor savings to install. I think the barrel nuts go on the studs off the car and then the trim snaps down from the outside. That was a suprise to me taking it off that '61 as I was expecting the C's, nuts, and washers under the dash so I pulled the dash loose in the expectations of getting working room and then find I could have carefully pried it off with a putty knife(s) from outside the car [B)]

                On mine I cut up some old ESD (static proof) electronics work bench mats I dug out of the dumpster at work to make the seals for the studs. They are a closed cell foam with a rubber outer layer. Worked great.


                Jeff in ND

                '53 Champion Hardtop

                Jeff in ND

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                • #9
                  You could pressurize the inside of the car,and squirt soapy water on suspected leaks from the outside[under hood]. Open a vent window,stuff a few rags around the edge.Wiggle a blow gun attached to an air hose through the rags and blow.

                  Oglesby,Il.
                  "Studebaker? It must be hard to find parts for those!"
                  Oglesby,Il.

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