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  • building a 202cu. engine

    I have a 224 crank and a 232 block i won't to build into a 202 engine,I an told i will need 224 pistons.the piston pin height will change can i use a longer rod and a 232 piston?

  • #2
    It's all simple math.
    Do your homework on the dimensions of these parts to verify how they may fit...or not.

    No offense..but if you need to ask a stranger these questions...you're in for a long, expensive trek.

    Mike

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    • #3
      You'll need custom pistons made with the 224 pin location and 232 bore size. I assume you must be building a engine to make some race bracket cut off size ?

      JDP/Maryland
      JDP Maryland

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      • #4
        Hi, DE-STROKE,

        quote:can i use a longer rod and a 232 piston?
        No.

        1. The last thing in the world a Stude V8 with a 224" crank needs or wants is a longer rod. The OEM Studebaker 6.625" rod is already 2.35 times as long as the 2.8125" stroke. Most serious race engines are in the rod/stroke range of 1.6 - 2.0.
        2. DE-STROKE hasn't told us where this is going, but as JDP says the only likely reason anyone might be building a 202" V8 is for some Bonneville class. The OEM cast 232" pistons are too heavy and too weak for serious racing. Custom forged pistons are a good investment at around $800 a set.

        Give us some more details of what your intended application and budget is like for this project and the suggestions will be closer to your goals.

        PackardV8
        PackardV8

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        • #5
          202 is not a good number for a class break at Bonneville. E class is 184 to 260.99 inches cubed. I would agree that the idea of a longer rod is not too appealing you need to trade off the weight of the piston verses rod weight and consider the RPM that you will be running.

          So what is the purpose of this engine?

          You should be able to get pistons for between $600 and $800. Rods will cost between $1600 and $3000 depending on who makes them. If this engine is not going to run at high rpm (above 6000 rpm)then stick with the stock rods. This assumes that you are not going to run something like 40 lbs of boost.

          David L
          David L

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          • #6
            E class sounds like a winner for big bore Studebaker with the 224 crank, or just a 259.

            JDP/Maryland
            JDP Maryland

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            • #7
              That is why I am using a destroked overbored 259 for my Bonneville Avanti.

              You can see some info on it at www.Avanti4DavidJr.com



              David L
              David L

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              • #8
                NO offense taken,I know the question seems lane, but as you already guess i an new to studebakers. I bought a truckload of miscellanies parts, heads ,cranks,engines ,T-10,after running all the numbers,i now have the making too build a small bore engine.
                The motor will be installed in my triumph TR3 frame The goal is to build under 3.5 liters so that why i an attempting this project. the motor is going to be N/A very high compression and need to turn high rpm's with out breaking .I have been building and racing small engines for 25 years (toyotas,rotaries,b.o.p 215's,ect) I an a survivor of three brain strokes(hence the name DE-STROKE )So now you know i must be craze. So i will gladly take advise from anyone who will offer it .Has any one used foreign sourced parts in these engine's? Maybe rods and pistons from Japanese or German engines? Sorry if i offend all purist,but i have been running american products on japanese engine's for years, Makes then go faster; MIKE DALTON

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                • #9
                  I'll probably get some flack for saying this but if you're putting this in a TR-3 you might be disappointed with the weight of a Stude V-8. I'd actually be thinking something along the lines of a Buick/Olds/Rover aluminum V-8 - it's already small, and a heck of a lot lighter than a Stude engine, and also keeps with the British theme as it was used in lots of British cars after Buick sold it to Rover. It must be at least reasonably stout as at least TVR sold it in turbocharged form (and don't forget that Olds had a turbo version back in the day) and also was used in Range Rovers.

                  nate

                  --
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                  http://members.cox.net/njnagel
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                  55 Commander Starlight
                  http://members.cox.net/njnagel

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                  • #10
                    Thanks for the concerns ,but my frame has a 8 inch ford rearend and a tubular wishbone front end .I just pulled the BOP215 out ,witch was turning about 300 h.p at the crank. Sold it to a young guy(30) to put in his sand rail. before the bop engine i ran a f-head willy's now thats heavy. thanks mike dalton

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                    • #11
                      If that's the case, forget using the parts you already have and start over. NOS 259 cranks are under a $100, late blocks are cheap or free. Used late 259 V8's can be had for under $500.

                      JDP/Maryland
                      JDP Maryland

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                      • #12
                        Still need too stay under 3.5 liters ,any idea's on rod and piston combo's,by using the 232 block i can always bore out . mike dalton

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                        • #13
                          Mike, Not wanting to discourage a new Stude nut but in your case since I have a number of MG's. I would go with a 3.4 L. Chev. V6. That Stude V8 is a hunk of Iron.

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                          • #14
                            Nothing about Studebakers makes any sense in the abstract. If DE-STROKE wants to put the tallest-widest-world's-heaviest-per-cubic-inch 202" V8 in his project car, more power to him. Here are a few suggestions to make the insanity affordable. Would these work?

                            1. Order custom forged pistons. Today's custom pistons are sufficiently light in weight so that, combined with the 2.8125" stroke of the 224" crank, the Stude rods can be made to live at high RPMs and save the cost of the aftermarket rods.
                            2. Have ARP bolts installed in re-sized Stude rods. Eliminate the pinch bolt and have the small ends sized for press-in pins. Less weight on the recip end is the key to making the Stude rods live.
                            3. A custom front balance damper and an aluminum flywheel are key parts for a high RPM Stude V8.
                            4. Since the 224" crank has the keyway advanced, the cam timing will have to be adjusted to get the high-RPM power wanted.
                            5. An R3 intake, one of the modified Mopar single plane intakes, or even the Smoljan intake would be necessary, as the OEM Stude dual-planes are definitely not high-RPM pieces.

                            Let's applaud this thinking outside the box. Yes, it is an irrational build, but in the best sense of the irrational concept there even existing a Studebaker Driver's Club.

                            thnx, jack vines


                            PackardV8
                            PackardV8

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                            • #15
                              There is no difference in stroke between the 232 crank and the 259 crank. The 259 crank is available in a long and a short snout, that is the only difference.

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