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Heat duct under 61 Hawk

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  • Heat duct under 61 Hawk

    The large heat duct that runs from under the car to the blower motor. Anyone know how it is routed? I ran it out and around the fire wall brace. I looks like it's mighty close to the exhaust pipe. I could not see it tucked behind the firewall brace to frame part as it would have crushed it, I could be wrong.

    Studebakers forever!
    Studebakers forever!

  • #2
    Took Pictures a while back for someone else. This is how its routed on the 1957 Silverhawk. Hope this helps.
    http://s122.photobucket.com/albums/o...Hawk%20Heater/

    Mabel 1949 Champion
    1957 Silverhawk
    1955 Champion 4Dr.Regal
    Gus 1958 Transtar
    1955 President State
    Fresno,Ca
    Mabel 1949 Champion
    Hawk 1957 Silverhawk
    Gus 1958 Transtar
    The Prez 1955 President State
    Blu 1957 Golden Hawk
    Daisy 1954 Regal Commander Starlight Coupe
    Fresno,Ca

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    • #3
      Thanks Anne, it is more logical to run it behind the fire wall brace, I see it would not crush it,where it's at now I think the pipe would roast it, great shots, I guess I got work to do tomorrow

      Studebakers forever!
      Studebakers forever!

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      • #4

        Installing that heater ducting is like a college initiation...... You may not like it, but you'll never forget it...

        Bob Johnstone

        http://www.studebaker-info.org
        55 President State Sedan
        64 GT Hawk
        70 Avanti (R3)
        64 GT Hawk (K7)
        1970 Avanti (R3)

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        • #5
          I've always been amazed at what a poorly engineered design this is[xx(] Just one of many in my quirky but lovable Studes... I'd have to think these types of things were as big a factor in their demise as anything else[|)]



          Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
          Parish, central NY 13131

          "Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

          "With your Lark you're on your own, free as a bird, alive as a Lark. You've suddenly discovered that happiness is a thing called Larking!"



          Comment


          • #6
            Bob
            I agree that the underseat heater, while it was an innovative idea, is poorly designed, even potentially dangerous, due to the risk of carbon monoxide poisoning. In fact, the loss of brain cells due to frequent exposure to low levels of carbon monoxide in our cars may explain a lot about us Studebaker enthusiasts[]
            That said, I feel the need to challenge your sweeping generalization that the heater is "Just one of many (engineering mistakes) in my quirky but lovable Studes... I'd have to think these types of things were as big a factor in their demise as anything else."
            On the contrary, I think that Studebaker engineering was generally pretty good and often innovative. Sure they made mistakes, but nothing on the order of the Corvair, Pinto, etc. There were a lot of reasons that Studebaker lost out to the competition, but I would put engineering deficiencies pretty far down the list of causes, not at the top.

            1950 Champion 4 Dr.
            Holdrege NE
            John
            1950 Champion
            W-3 4 Dr. Sedan
            Holdrege NE

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            • #7
              The under the seat technology I think is very good. In 1941 my Champion has great heat and it supplies both the front and back with great comfort, I think the problem came when they tried to use it with the vent system. if the blower was undernath with the heater core it would be fine, making it come from the bottom to the side and then in was a stretch. I have to make it work or my dear wife will not ride in it in the cool weather. The innovation is there as the defroster and the heater are separate. This is good thinking on Studes part.

              Studebakers forever!
              Studebakers forever!

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              • #8
                A benefits of the underseat heater were that in cold weather areas like western Pa was that the rear seat floor also get heat. With the cowl moiunted heaters common on most other the 1950s cars the rear seat passengers did not get any direct heat. The older cars did not have the ducts like the newer cars to direct heat to the rear seat with ducts on or near the drivshaft hump. Also remember older cars did not have the 200+ degree engine temps that are now common to aid the heater in keeping a car warm inside,

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                • #9
                  quote:Originally posted by Lothar

                  Bob
                  That said, I feel the need to challenge your sweeping generalization that the heater is "Just one of many (engineering mistakes) in my quirky but lovable Studes... I'd have to think these types of things were as big a factor in their demise as anything else."
                  On the contrary, I think that Studebaker engineering was generally pretty good and often innovative. Sure they made mistakes, but nothing on the order of the Corvair, Pinto, etc. There were a lot of reasons that Studebaker lost out to the competition, but I would put engineering deficiencies pretty far down the list of causes, not at the top.
                  Hi Lothar-

                  As I've learned more about Studes I keep coming across these substandard ideas: Heater core in the inner fender where the cold and snow off the turning tire detract from efficiency, going into a flexible paper tube into the passenger compartment- or even crazier, under the floor, susceptible to everything on the road; poorly designed fenders and body seemingly designed to encourage rust, rather than fight against it, and no inner fenders; those awful screws instead of normal bolts in the door hinges; the OHV 6 head prone to cracking; and my favorite, bellhousings that have to be dialed in, or you'll have clutch/flex plate failure[}] And that's just to name a few!

                  Make no mistake- these things don't deter me today; in fact, they make me want to protect the old mutts even more! But in their day, they had to be turning off more and more people as these things came to light... as I've said, when I was a kid and Studes were still current as used cars, they were lucky if they were made fun of; mostly they were outright hated!

                  My father would choke on his Tiparillo if he saw me dragging home all these Studes[:I]



                  Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
                  Parish, central NY 13131

                  "Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

                  "With your Lark you're on your own, free as a bird, alive as a Lark. You've suddenly discovered that happiness is a thing called Larking!"



                  Comment


                  • #10
                    That duct is not paper.

                    Most bellhousings need to be dialed in (for manual transmissions). That is not a Studebaker issue.

                    Sixes don't belong in Studebakers (only joking).

                    Studebaker did a lot with a limited budget.

                    They did have problems with rust but so did almost everyone else.

                    David L
                    David L

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                    • #11
                      I shouldn't have said "paper", but it's not far off. And a far cry from the molded plastic ducts most other cars used.

                      In all the years of working on Big 3 brands, up to and including 800+ HP Big Block Chevies, I've never had to, or even heard of, dialing in bellhousings... never had a problem. Just be sure the mounting surfaces are clean, and bolt 'em on...

                      To me, part of what won me over was the story of how hard they tried to hang on with limited funds and a lot of ingenuity. But I can see what some of the effects of that was



                      Robert (Bob) Andrews Owner- Studebakeracres- on the IoMT (Island of Misfit Toys!)
                      Parish, central NY 13131

                      "Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311

                      "With your Lark you're on your own, free as a bird, alive as a Lark. You've suddenly discovered that happiness is a thing called Larking!"



                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I never dialed in a bellhousing until about ten years ago--never even THOUGHT about and never had any sort of nasty failure as a result--this is with lots of Brit Ford stuff (I was a Cortina freak for a long, LONG time) and American V8s. I only started doing it because of what I learned from Studebaker people. I mean, what the hell--it takes about an hour or two if you have the engine on the stand. The hardest part for me is drill the the block/bellhousing oversize--it really freaks me out thinking it has to be PERFECT. Next time I'm getting one of those adj. hand reamers mentioned in another thread! It might take ten times longer, but it will be a lot less nervewracking!

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                        • #13
                          Some transmissions will work fine with the bellhousing being a little off. However some others such as Tremec TKO's will not. Although many people have gotten away without dialing in their bellhousings on non Studebaker engines some have had problems.

                          Check out some of the threads for Mustangs and others that have used T5's,TKO's etc.

                          You can get away without dialing in your Studebaker bellhousing also, most of the time! But spend the extra time and you won't have wasted your time.

                          David L
                          David L

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                          • #14
                            quote:Originally posted by bams50

                            I shouldn't have said "paper", but it's not far off. And a far cry from the molded plastic ducts most other cars used.

                            Parish, central NY 13131

                            "Some people live for the rules, I live for exceptions"- 311
                            [/brown]
                            "With your Lark you're on your own, free as a bird, alive as a Lark. You've suddenly discovered that happiness is a thing called Larking!"



                            The new ducts as sold by SI are of a great material, it's very easy to work with and looks and feels durable.When I removed the old stuff many months ago I could not belive that it was used on a car, to it's defense it was very old and weather worn

                            Studebakers forever!
                            Studebakers forever!

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                            • #15
                              We just used aluminum dryer vent hose on mine.

                              Lee

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