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  • Kill switch ideas

    Gang - I'm seeing light at the end of the project tunnel for my '63 Daytona hardtop and I'd like to mount a hidden switch to disable ignition. I know this wouldn't deter someone bent on taking the car, but it might stop an amateur for five minutes.
    I'd appreciate any suggestion(s) on what wire to ground, snip or otherwise interrupt. Or, would a [u]fuel</u> switch be better than electrical?
    Who has done what to their satisfaction?
    Thanks mucho!

    Western Washington, USA

  • #2
    How about a 1951 style starter switch below the clutch? Leave the keys in the car, and still no one under the age of 50 will be able to start it!

    Las Vegas, NV - Stop by, coffee's on!
    '51 Champion Business Coupe G899965 10G-Q4-1434

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    • #3
      Option for consideration -- my '99 Toyota has a kill switch installed by the factory which disables the ignition switch. I assume it cuts the hot wire from the battery to the ignition. It is a round lock with round key like are on soft drink machines. Being a current car part, it might be inexpensive and the parts people can verify which wire it breaks.

      '50 Champion, 1 family owner

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      • #4
        OH, I forgot. Vegas Paul, I resemble that remark!! But true, no one knows how to start my car.

        '50 Champion, 1 family owner

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        • #5
          I had a kill switch on a Honda that a privious owner had installed. Would he auto stores have any?

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          • #6
            If you have an electric fuel pump, a simple switch in an out of the way place will work. I have seen a few where if the pump was off there was enough fuel to provide a getaway but only until the thief was on the street. At that point the car runs like its fuel starved(which it is), but in a panicked getaway this new ride has got problems that just cropped out of nowhere....

            There's nothing to it, just a simple switch in line with the circuit will do.

            Personally, I'd go with and/either/or. Just remember the switch is still off once you return to the vehicle, and that the switch is well hidden and out of sight......

            [img=left]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/My%201950%202r5%20Studebaker%20Pickup%20with%20turbocharger/P1000137-1.jpg[/img=left][img=right]http://i158.photobucket.com/albums/t102/PlainBrownR2/DSC00005.jpg?t=1171153370[/img=right]
            1964 Studebaker Commander R2 clone
            1963 Studebaker Daytona Hardtop with no engine or transmission
            1950 Studebaker 2R5 w/170 six cylinder and 3spd OD
            1955 Studebaker Commander Hardtop w/289 and 3spd OD and Megasquirt port fuel injection(among other things)

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            • #7
              I just ran my battery cable to an NHRA accepted master cut-off switch. This presumes the battery isn't easy to get to or to be able to run another wire from. All power except the radio is cut.

              In my wagon, the switch is mounted so that when I get out of the car, I can flip the switch handle without being obvious. Getting in is a little more obvious but for the most part who cares...I'm outa there anyway!.
              One of those..."hidden in plain sight" switches!

              A long time ago, a friend had a row of 5 toggle switches in a small panel in his dashboard. This was a combination lock for the power to the ignition.
              If...all the switches were not in the right combination of up & down...the car would crank but wouldn't start.

              Mike

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              • #8
                Ground the - side of the coil using the cigar lighter.

                [img=left]http://i52.photobucket.com/albums/g27/Rosstude/OldWorld2005002.jpg[/img=left]
                Ross.
                Riverside, Ca.
                1957 Provincial X2
                1958 Transtar
                sigpic
                Ross.
                Riverside, Ca.
                1957 Provincial X2
                1958 Transtar

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                • #9
                  That cigar lighter trick works very well.Dad had an Avanti set up that way when he bought it,neat and deters smoking in the car.Pull the lighter and put it in your pocket for even more protection.Steve
                  sigpic

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                  • #10
                    quote:Originally posted by Mike Van Veghten

                    I just ran my battery cable to an NHRA accepted master cut-off switch...the switch is mounted so that when I get out of the car, I can flip the switch handle without being obvious.
                    I did the same on my '54. Made it easy to work on the electrical system also since the battery was under a panel in the trunk.

                    If it is TRULY NHRA accepted, however, it would need to be external and easily seen and identified. Not a good anti-theft idea that way. [:0]


                    I like the cigar lighter idea. [^]


                    Dick Steinkamp
                    Bellingham, WA

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                    • #11
                      Is the idea to divert the negative coil wire thru the lighter? I like the idea of simply taking the lighter out to prevent starting.

                      Western Washington, USA

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                      • #12
                        Lighter trick is too obvious.
                        Had an acquaintance many moons ago told me the "tricks" NOT to use! That was one of them.
                        Too old...too well known!

                        One my dad used to do...replace the coil wire with a piece of properly sized rubber hose with the boots on it.
                        NO secondary coil power!
                        Works well with the Studes locking hoods...just more time for the thief to have to spend trying to figure it out.

                        Mike

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                        • #13
                          Back in "the day" my Grandfather had a '55 Plymouth and the glove compartment on that car was located in the center of the dash. The ignition switch was originally located slightly to the left of the glove box. He mounted the ignition switch inside of the glove box, then (being a plumber by trade, and using what he had laying around) inserted a smooth chrome disc from a sink where the ignition switch would have been. Anyone getting into the car wouldn't see the switch anywhere on the dash. I guess it worked because no one ever stole the car but I don't know if it was very convenient to open the glove box every time you wanted to start up.

                          Dave Bonn
                          Valencia, PA
                          '54 Champion Starliner

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                          • #14
                            I have a console in my Daytona. I've been looking to run the cutoff switch into the ashtry at the front of the console. Wires hidden, and with some small amount of 'debris' over the toggle switch, no one will find it.

                            ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                            Tom - Mulberry, FL

                            1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2125.60)

                            Tom - Bradenton, FL

                            1964 Studebaker Daytona - 289 4V, 4-Speed (Cost To Date: $2514.10)
                            1964 Studebaker Commander - 170 1V, 3-Speed w/OD

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                            • #15
                              A friend of mine drives Toyotas, as do his parents and siblings. Toyotas used to be VERY high on the theft rate list because the ignition lock were easily defeated.

                              He made an interlock with a normally-open push-button switch mounted in a bracket behind the ashtray. This was wired into the lead that runs from the ignition switch to the starter solenoid. Unless the ashtray is pushed right in, the switch is open, and the engine will not crank.

                              Parking, he'd simply pull the ashtray out about half an inch, enough to open the switch. In fact, you can do that well before you park, so onlookers at the parking site don't see it done. If a thief breaks into the car, he will almost invariably open the ashtray to look for keys, since lots of folk "hide" a spare set there. Equally invariably, the thief will leave the ashtray pulled pulled out. (He's a thief, which means he's too lazy to work, right?) So he defeats the ignition lock, and finds he cannot start the car. Given enough time and ingenuity, he could jump the starter at the solenoid, and get the car going. But he never knows how much time he has, and he's lazy, and probably also none too bright. He's going to move on to greener pastures.

                              Incidentally, I'm talking about older, daily-driver type Toyotas being stolen by teenagers for joyrides, either off the street or out of convenience store parking lots.

                              This should also work well to protect a Studebaker from the joyrider type of thief. There's really nothing you can do to deter a professional thief who REALLY wants your car. The good news is, there's relatively few of those types around, and fewer still who have buyers waiting for stolen Studebakers.

                              Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands
                              Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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