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Thermostat - Is it really needed?

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  • Thermostat - Is it really needed?


  • #2
    The thermostat is needed,just not the bad one you have. I've had several in the last few years bad out of the box.Don't go with the cheap ones,pay the extra buck or 2 for better quality. Running without one can cause poor performance from running too cold,or overheating from too much flow through the radiator,which doesn't give the coolant enough time to cool on it's way through.

    63VY4 Leakin' Lena Hagerstown MD

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    • #3
      I don't know what a '63 OHV 6 cyl. engine requires, but I would consider using a 160 degree stat.
      Rog

      '59 Lark VI Regal Hardtop
      '59 Lark VI Regal Hardtop
      Smithtown,NY
      Recording Secretary, Long Island Studebaker Club

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      • #4

        Here's a previous thread that has a very good thermostat recommendation.
        http://www.studebakerdriversclub.com...rms=thermostat
        There are some good thermostat threads out there...
        Search word 'Thermostat' and search in 'subject only'.

        But.........

        An engine is designed to run in an optimal 'range'.
        The temperature is one of those 'ranges'.
        The thermostat helps keep the engine in that 'range' even if load and outside temperature should fluctuate.
        Do not remove it completely.
        Besides a very, very slow warm up, you might cause an overheating problem.
        Why?
        By removing the thermostat, you are also removing the restriction that the hole in the thermostat provides.
        This can cause the coolant to circulate too fast,
        and heat transfer to the coolant will not be complete.
        Hope the info helps.
        Jeff[8D]



        quote:Originally posted by tomnoller
        HTIH (Hope The Info Helps)

        Jeff


        Get your facts first, and then you can distort them as much as you please. Mark Twain



        Note: SDC# 070190 (and earlier...)

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        • #5
          On a related note, my Rockne always runs hot. It calls for a 135 degree thermostat. I haven't been able to find one and the suggestion was made that I drill a hole in the thermostat base to allow additional flow.

          Any thoughts on that?
          "All attempts to 'rise above the issue' are simply an excuse to avoid it profitably." --Dick Gregory

          Brad Johnson, SDC since 1975, ASC since 1990
          Pine Grove Mills, Pa.
          '33 Rockne 10,
          '51 Commander Starlight,
          '53 Commander Starlight "Désirée",
          '56 Sky Hawk

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          • #6
            Thanks guys, I'm off to Auto Zone tomorrow for an AutoRad. Good info, Jeff!

            Western Washington, USA

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            • #7
              On a old 38 Plymouth I had I cut a piece of metal the same diameter of the thermostat and drilled a 1/2" hole in the middle and didn't have a problem. It might work on the Rockne.
              quote:Originally posted by rockne10

              On a related note, my Rockne always runs hot. It calls for a 135 degree thermostat. I haven't been able to find one and the suggestion was made that I drill a hole in the thermostat base to allow additional flow.

              Any thoughts on that?

              7G-Q1 49 2R12 10G-F5 56B-D4 56B-F2
              As soon as you find a product you like they will stop making it.

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              • #8
                Put that thermostat and the next one you buy in a pot on your stove, bring the water up to a boil to make sure the new one opens up before putting back in the vehicle.

                That way you SEE that it works.

                My tip of the day.

                Chop Stu
                61 Lark

                sigpic

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                • #9
                  One thing I like about the 195 degree thermostats is that they heat up the oil enough on short trips to cook out any moisture that may condense inside of the crankcase. Moisture condensation can become a real problem on engines using a road draft tube. Take apart an engine with a ton of sludge inside the valve covers and valley, and chances are it was a short trip car or one with a low temp thermostat or no thermostat at all.

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                  • #10
                    Tom-It is not unusual for a new rebuilt engine to run on the hot side for some miles....Now what's hot ? I'd say around 200 degrees. How many miles ? I'd say take it out every day and drive around town varying speeds to help the rings seat. I'm guessing you have a nice, tight engine. Did you have any problems with the rebuild ? Was the engine hard to turn by hand and again hard to turn over and crank ? Or was it hard by hand and then no problems with your good starter ? I'd avoid highway speeds above 50 for a week or so (maybe too conservative), but do accelerate/decelerate frequently...I'll bet your temps go down in a week or so. You MUST use a thermostat or risk ruining your engine.....(ask me how I know)

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                    • #11
                      <<was it hard by hand and then no problems with your good starter?>>
                      Yes, Jack! I'm sure you're right. My 55 V8 did the same thing after a rebuild.
                      Got that MotoRad Failsafe thermostat today and it worked poifectly! Thanks!

                      Western Washington, USA

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