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Studebakers for Towing?

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  • mmagic
    replied
    Got my drivers license on a Wednesday and we left Friday from Ohio to Florida towing a 14' travel trailer. I remember doing most all the driving. I don't recall any issues.

    The setup was a '55 President with an axle attached equalizer hitch. Dad pulled many miles with that setup first on a '51 Land Cruiser, then the '55 President and then a '61 Lark... all Automatic V8's. He didn't pull in the Rockies but all through the Smokies and Appalachians. The worst grade I remember him complaining about was on a country road outside of Somerset, PA.

    I don't know if you can find an axle hitch anymore but that made for a sweet setup that didn't tear up or rely on the car suspension or beat up the passengers.

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  • Green53
    replied
    By all means use an equilizer hitch and then get a controller for the electric brakes on the trailer. Much safer.

    Denny L

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  • Dick Steinkamp
    replied
    Originally posted by Dads Baby View Post
    Dick, I understand, but I was responding to #23 and #25 where they addressed Lori. Although all the info is very informative!
    Got it. I missed those two.

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  • Dads Baby
    replied
    Dick, I understand, but I was responding to #23 and #25 where they addressed Lori. Although all the info is very informative!

    Leave a comment:


  • Dick Steinkamp
    replied
    Originally posted by Dads Baby View Post
    I am sure Lori has figured out what to tow her trailer with by now. Her post was from 6 years ago!
    Probably, but I think the responses of recent are to #20 which was posted yesterday.

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  • Dads Baby
    replied
    I am sure Lori has figured out what to tow her trailer with by now. Her post was from 6 years ago!

    Leave a comment:


  • K-Hawk
    replied
    My experience with towing has taught me it is always easier to get moving than to stop. Just make sure your tow vehicle is in good shape, excellent cooling and excellent brakes and you should be fine, good luck and enjoy that air stream.

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  • SilverHawkDan
    replied
    Lori,
    I currently tow the Avanti (over 5000 lbs.) on a two axle all steel trailer (1500 lbs.) with the Stude camper. 289, 3 speed with OD, 4.88 axle. I am planning to switch to a 4.30 axle soon. It tows fine until I get to high altitude. One recommendation, supercharger or turbo. You don't need much, maybe 3 or 4 lbs boost but at high altitude it will really help. That is my plan when I switch axles. By the way a late model GM truck class 3 hitch is the same width as a Stude truck frame. I can post pics of the installation if you need them. It's a bolt in set up at the frame.


    Dan

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  • candbstudebakers
    replied
    Back in the early 70" We made a trip from California to Minnesota, we towed a 21 foot Shasta trailer With my 60 1/2 ton and had a slide in camper on the truck, along with were my wife and the 4 kids and one dog, in the closet was 35 case of Coors beer for my brother you could not get it in Minnesota back then, the truck was a fresh R-1 with Air, heavy duty T85 with overdrive and a TT 427 rear end and the hitch set up was an equalizer type with spring bars and anti sway set up, ran like a top all the way there across the high desert in 2nd over at 2500 rpm and the brakes were changed to 11' Fin drums, when I got back from the trip I changed the engine as I wanted to save the R-1 so I installed a 413 Chrysler with the push button tork flight and Chrysler 330 rear end never had a problem pulling the trailer or any thing else with that set up, so yes Studebakers can be used for towing.

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  • brian6373
    replied
    Hey lotsalarks, are you shure about the weight on that trailer? I have a 20' Nomad from the late 70's, and the plaque on it gives the weight as 5000. You can take the trailer to a public scale and have it weighed if there isn't a weight given on the plaque. That said, if the trailer has electric brakes then the modern controlers that you install in the tow vehicle are amaizing. Like in a previous post said " you won't know the trailer is there". I'd also agree that just about any of your Studes should not have a problem towing even a 5000 lbs. trailer.

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  • Dick Steinkamp
    replied
    Originally posted by t walgamuth View Post

    anybody have a prediction for fuel economy with this setup towing or non towing?
    Others may have success with a stock R1 engine in a daily driver, but I haven't. The compression ratio is 10.25/1. IMHO, today's premium fuel is not high enough in octane to run this motor without severely knocking the timing back. At the timing required to avoid detonation, you have lost a lot of power. Again, others may have found the secret to run this motor, but I never have.

    For a stock 289, 4 speed, 3.31, I would expect 11-13 around town and 15-18 highway. Less when towing. I'd also be careful with the weight you tow. The car would have enough power to pull a race car on a trailer, but without 4 wheel trailer brakes, it would have a difficult time stopping that load.

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  • Warren Webb
    replied
    The 3:31 will be a bit "doggy" off the line & you might go through clutches sooner than most but should be fine on the highway. Wagonaire's have heavier springs to start. You could always install a pair of 70's Camaro air shocks to level it.

    Leave a comment:


  • t walgamuth
    replied
    A buddy has a 64 wagonaire with an R-1 engine and four speed. It has disc brakes and AC. I am thinking of buying it and using it to pull my race car and other things. The drivetrain came out of a 35K mile vehicle. I am thinking it would not be hard to beef up the rear springs if it is too soft.

    It has the 3.31 TT rear end.

    anybody have a prediction for fuel economy with this setup towing or non towing?

    Leave a comment:


  • sbca96
    replied
    My brother used his '64 Lark Daytona to tow a small 4x6 trailer across
    country from California to Michigan in the mid 90s. We upgraded it to
    disc brakes and the trailer hitch from our '63 Lark Wagonaire.

    My dad hauled my moms '59 Chevy Impala convertible all the way from
    Michigan to California with his 1963 Lark Daytona 4spd/4:56 rear end.

    So I bought a 1995 Impala SS, added a class III hitch, and plan to tow
    my '63 Avanti to shows with it. I figure its only fair.[)]



    Of course, chances are I will want to DRIVE the Avanti instead.

    Tom

    '63 Avanti, zinc plated drilled & slotted 03 Mustang Cobra 13" front disc/98 GT rear brakes, 03 Cobra 17" wheels, GM alt, 97 Z28 leather seats, soon: 97 Z28 T-56 6-spd, Ported heads w/SST full flow valves, 'R3' 276 cam, Edelbrock AFB Carb, GM HEI distributor, 8.8mm plug wires

    Leave a comment:


  • studeclunker
    replied
    LOL Hey Jerry, I know what you mean about brakes! My '62 Champ stops way better pulling the horse trailer than solo!(LOL)

    By the by, Mr Biggs; Pete went through a transformation like the butterfly emerging from the dead caterpillar's crysalis. He looks like one of mine in that picture. Now Pete is truely a thing of beauty. Gives me hope for mine.


    Home of the incredible Mr. Ed!
    Lotsa Larks!
    K.I.S.S. Keep It Simple Studebaker!
    Ron Smith
    Where the heck is Lewiston, CA?

    Leave a comment:

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