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63 -64 LARK R2 rims ????

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  • Wheels: 63 -64 LARK R2 rims ????

    In ordering a LARK R-2 from the factory,what size rims would come either with the complete package or separated H.D. equipment, ?Some show a 6 in.wide rim, others a 5 1/2 in wheel. Any info out there on this?

  • #2
    Bob, the earliest (Press Preview) Super Package 1963 Larks are shown as having been equipped with 5.5" wide Avanti wheels. However, they were not used on regular production R2 Larks and Hawks, Super Package or otherwise. Those cars got the 4.5" wide "regular" wheels, just like any other Lark or Hawk.

    All Avantis had 5" wide wheels, however, regardless of engine.

    To the best of my knowledge, Studebaker did not offer a 6.0" wide wheel on anything during that time. BP
    Last edited by BobPalma; 07-27-2019, 12:42 PM. Reason: corrected Avanti wheel width; it was indeed only 5"!
    We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

    Ayn Rand:
    "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

    G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

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    • #3
      Don’t forget about the double hump wheels used on ‘63 disc brake cars.
      Eric DeRosa

      \'49 2R-5 (original Survivor)
      \'63 R2 Lark (the money-pit-mobile)
      \'60 Lark Convertible (project in waiting)

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      • #4
        But, not all Disc Brake equipped Cars had the "Double Hump" Kelsey Hayes Wheels.
        Most if not all USA, '64 Larks, Hawks and Avantis did.

        Many earlier Disc equipped Cars used very standard looking Budd Wheels with only very slight Caliper and crossover tube clearance. These "LOOK" Like but are not identical to, every drum brake Car Wheel back to 1959.

        As Bob said, all were 4 1/2 Inches wide, except Avantis and Late 1966 Models.

        Hmm, I always understood that the Avanti Wheels were 5 Inches, but unlike the Standard Wheels in the '59-'64 Chassis Parts Catalog, the Jet Thrust listings and the Avanti Catalog do not give the width.
        StudeRich
        Second Generation Stude Driver,
        Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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        • #5
          1963 & 64 Avanti rims were 5 inches wide. The Hallibrand magnesium wheels were 5.5 in. wide, but these were so rare that the only ones I ever saw back in the day were the ones in car mags. I think Studebaker should have equipped all Avanti-powered 1963-4 Larks & Hawks with 5" wheels, but they didn't.
          -Dwight

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          • #6
            Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
            But, not all Disc Brake equipped Cars had the "Double Hump" Kelsey Hayes Wheels.
            Most if not all USA, '64 Larks, Hawks and Avantis did.

            Many earlier Disc equipped Cars used very standard looking Budd Wheels with only very slight Caliper and crossover tube clearance. These "LOOK" Like but are not identical to, every drum brake Car Wheel back to 1959.

            As Bob said, all were 4 1/2 Inches wide, except Avantis and Late 1966 Models.

            Hmm, I always understood that the Avanti Wheels were 5 Inches, but unlike the Standard Wheels in the '59-'64 Chassis Parts Catalog, the Jet Thrust listings and the Avanti Catalog do not give the width.
            That's right, Rich. I corrected my original post. BP
            We've got to quit saying, "How stupid can you be?" Too many people are taking it as a challenge.

            Ayn Rand:
            "You can avoid reality, but you cannot avoid the consequences of avoiding reality."

            G. K. Chesterton: This triangle of truisms, of father, mother, and child, cannot be destroyed; it can only destroy those civilizations which disregard it.

            Comment

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