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  • Fuel System: Fuel pump recommendation

    One of our chapter members stopped by the house today and we decided to visit another member a few miles from here. I was driving my 52 pickup and he was driving his Lark. Before he got 100 yards from my house his car quit. I had to tow him back to the house. We have an extra Studebaker for a few days.
    He said the electric fuel pump feeding his SBC had quit and this has happened several times since he has owned the car. The pump is mounted at the back next to the pump where it should be, but this is an ongoing problem. He has tried more than one brand and the last two were made in USA. The longest any pump has lasted is 1 year, but some only a few days.
    Can anyone recommend a reliable pump that will last? I know some of you have been running one for a long time. His car does not have room for a mechanical pump with the engine swap.
    Attached Files
    "In the heart of Arkansas."
    Searcy, Arkansas
    1952 Commander 2 door. Really fine 259.
    1952 2R pickup

  • #2
    Well, the car is gone. The owner came back and was going to switch pumps. When he rapped on the one on the car it started working. I hope he made it home.
    "In the heart of Arkansas."
    Searcy, Arkansas
    1952 Commander 2 door. Really fine 259.
    1952 2R pickup

    Comment


    • #3
      Apparently that works nearly every time for a temporary fix. I had a tow truck driver tell me that when they go to pick up a fuel pump failure car they can almost every time thump on the bottom of the gas tank and it will start and run long enough to get it back to the garage for the replacement pump installation.

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      • #4
        He needs a reliable replacement. Surely one exists.
        "In the heart of Arkansas."
        Searcy, Arkansas
        1952 Commander 2 door. Really fine 259.
        1952 2R pickup

        Comment


        • #5
          I would try to determine what causes these failures, and the very FIRST place I would look, is in the Gas Tank for contamination.
          StudeRich
          Second Generation Stude Driver,
          Proud '54 Starliner Owner

          Comment


          • #6
            When I first switched to electric fuel pumps in the late 1980s, I began with a cylindrical pump of some type which I have forgotten. It lasted a few months then failed. I next tried a cube type FACET pump, and since then have used them exclusively, over half a million miles, and only had two fail. I prefer part #40185 for Studebaker and Packard V8. I have had EFI on the two Stude 289s for several years now, but recently replaced the FACET pump in the 56J last year. WARNING: stay away from the Chinese knockoffs, which can be had for $10-$20, they are junk. Here is a link to the guy I bought the last one from, last year: https://www.googleadservices.com/pag...RoCz5MQAvD_BwE
            Last edited by JoeHall; 07-20-2019, 09:08 PM.

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            • #7
              I followed Joe's advice for fuel pumps and so far so good. I installed a fuel filter that I call my 'chunky' filter between the fuel tank and pump, and then installed a 'fine' filter right before the carb. From what I've read, failure to replace the rubber fuel line with new fuel line that is compatible with today's fuel, and not installing a filter before the fuel pump (especially the rotary style of pumps) are the main reasons that fuel pumps don't last that long. Also like Joe says, don't buy a junk pump because you are CASO...pay for one that has a quality reputation. Another pitfall of hot rodders is they buy way too much pump for what the engine actually needs...super high pressure and/or volume pumps are not required for daily driver engines. I spent a lot of time reading reviews on fuel pumps and for low pressure pumps the Facet cube pump and Bosch inline rotary pumps (can't remember the model #, but it was a popular one that only puts out 4 psi) seemed to have good reputations. cheers, Junior
              sigpic
              1954 C5 Hamilton car.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by JoeHall View Post
                When I first switched to electric fuel pumps in the late 1980s, I began with a cylindrical pump of some type which I have forgotten. It lasted a few months then failed. I next tried a cube type FACET pump, and since then have used them exclusively, over half a million miles, and only had two fail. I prefer part #40185 for Studebaker and Packard V8. I have had EFI on the two Stude 289s for several years now, but recently replaced the FACET pump in the 56J last year. WARNING: stay away from the Chinese knockoffs, which can be had for $10-$20, they are junk. Here is a link to the guy I bought the last one from, last year: https://www.googleadservices.com/pag...RoCz5MQAvD_BwE
                The one he was dealing with yesterday was a Facet pump. He tried the Chinese knock-offs originally with bad results. The current pump says made in USA. I don't know any details about the wiring and such. I would have liked to have checked for correct voltage and ground as well as the actual plumbing, but I wasn't invited to.
                "In the heart of Arkansas."
                Searcy, Arkansas
                1952 Commander 2 door. Really fine 259.
                1952 2R pickup

                Comment


                • #9
                  It also helps to have a filter on the suction side. Seems this beauty would be perfect to see if debris is being ingested by the pump.

                  https://www.pegasusautoracing.com/pr...sp?RecID=29751



                  Sounds like rapping on the pump fixing it, could have be caused by debris and the jolt freed the kidney stone to pass.

                  Also, most pumps are not good suckers.. The higher the pump is to the level of fuel in the tank, or above the tank, then sucking fuel to the pressure side becomes a chore.

                  Modern cars place the pump in the tank for that reason. Mounting the pump in the rear at the tank outlet level is optimal. Most Stude carbs dislike pressure above 4.5 psi. I'd mount a 6 to 10 psi by the tank and use a regulator right by the inlet of the carb. This way you can overcome the friction of the fuel line and its length from the tank to the Carb.

                  This Facet pump seems the best, 3/8 inlet 7psi and claims "..60" dry lift rating," which says it can be mounted 60" above the fuel level.
                  https://www.pegasusautoracing.com/pr...asp?RecID=9807


                  I find This location is is pretty convenient. The fuel lie goes up and over the axel hump, so once fuel is on the other side, its more of a siphon effect.



                  The pump in this picture is a more performance pump and not recommended for normal application..


                  The final issue in the fuel system here is the "Vent." The fuel that the pump sucks out of the tank has to be replaced by air. If the vent is "plugged" at some point the pump can not overcome the "vacuum" in the tank.

                  Just somethings to think about.. Its easy to add components, but a better understanding of how the whole system works and the understanding of the "Cause and Effect" of your modification certainly helps in doing it right and avoiding intermittent issues.

                  Click image for larger version

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                  Last edited by SScopelli; 07-21-2019, 11:52 AM.

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                  • #10
                    The reason I prefer the Facet #40185 is because it has sufficient volume to push plenty of bleed off fuel back to the tank, via the return line. I run a metal filter near the carb, that has a 1/4" fuel return spigot, which pops open at around 3-4 PSI, and bleeds off excess fuel from the pump, and returns it to the tank.

                    If not using a return line, the Facet #40160 is better suited. I ran those for many years, before installing return lines in all Studes. They will not quite keep up with the return line though.

                    I only use CUBE type Facet pumps. Don't know anything about their other types.
                    Last edited by JoeHall; 07-22-2019, 09:14 AM.

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                    • #11
                      The one he showed me did not look like the cube version. I now know what to look for if I buy one though.
                      "In the heart of Arkansas."
                      Searcy, Arkansas
                      1952 Commander 2 door. Really fine 259.
                      1952 2R pickup

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I run a 12 volt Holley rotary vane pump on my 1950 6 volt Champion. I also use a 1 ohm 50 watt resistor to control the voltage and lower the pressure to a couple PSI.
                        As mentioned, be sure to use a filter before the pump intake.

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                        • #13
                          Larry Claypool wrote a wonderful article in the March, 2011 issue of TW named "Pumping With Volts". In it he suggests several different types and brands, depending upon application, whether a mechanical pump is retained, whether pull-through is needed, and what PSI is required. Three pages, excellent reading, and if you can't get your hands on the actual issue, a PDF archive is available from the SDC store. Highly recommended!

                          Clark in San Diego | '63 Standard (F2) "Barney" | http://studeblogger.blogspot.com

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                          • #14
                            Howard, a bad ground will do that, BTDT numerous times with 56 wagon project. the longest lasting pump i have used is the carter street/strip pump on the 62. but it is noisy. hope to see you this weekend. Luck Doofus

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                            • #15
                              Do you still run the mechanical pump along with the electrical pump?? Joehall and Junior
                              Love my Lark

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