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51 Studebaker 232 V8 won't start after tune up.

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  • Engine: 51 Studebaker 232 V8 won't start after tune up.

    It was misfiring with the old points and when I replaced them with new points, it won't start now. Maybe I'm doing something wrong? I don't know.

    According to this chart, I set the point gap with .016 http://www.tpocr.com/studebaker.html

    A picture of the old points.



    And a picture of the new points. It may not look it in the photo but it is a nice snug fit with the gauge between it.

    sigpic
    51 Studebaker Commander Land Cruiser

  • #2
    If all you did is change the points, that pretty much has to be the problem. Check your wire connections and that the points are not shorted. Of course if they were, and they're modern made, their plastic would melt down. (ask how I know) As long as the points open at the high point of the distributor cam, it should run whether the dwell is correct or not as long as the gap is not massive. If the points do not open it will not run.
    Last edited by bensherb; 06-15-2019, 10:02 PM.
    sigpic

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    • #3
      Can you see if the spade connector on the red wire is touching the case or the base plate, either at the top or at the bottom, as it appears in this picture?

      I don't like the look of that corroded nut on the super flexible grounding cable. All the dirt and corrosion in the rest of the distributor doesn't look good either.

      Did you do anything besides just changing the points and condenser?
      RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

      17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
      10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
      10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
      4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
      5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
      56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
      60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

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      • #4
        I would agree that it certainly looks possible that the lug on the red condenser wire is touching the breaker plate. And, yes, that distributor looks a little crusty inside.
        Gord Richmond, within Weasel range of the Alberta Badlands

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        • #5
          Originally posted by bensherb View Post
          If all you did is change the points, that pretty much has to be the problem. Check your wire connections and that the points are not shorted. Of course if they were, and they're modern made, their plastic would melt down. (ask how I know) As long as the points open at the high point of the distributor cam, it should run whether the dwell is correct or not as long as the gap is not massive. If the points do not open it will not run.
          Spark plugs, wires, cap and rotor was also replaced.
          sigpic
          51 Studebaker Commander Land Cruiser

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by RadioRoy View Post
            Can you see if the spade connector on the red wire is touching the case or the base plate, either at the top or at the bottom, as it appears in this picture?

            I don't like the look of that corroded nut on the super flexible grounding cable. All the dirt and corrosion in the rest of the distributor doesn't look good either.

            Did you do anything besides just changing the points and condenser?
            That's how it looked and I have no record on when the last time it had a tune up. I'll clean that up and see what happens.

            - - - Updated - - -

            Originally posted by gordr View Post
            I would agree that it certainly looks possible that the lug on the red condenser wire is touching the breaker plate. And, yes, that distributor looks a little crusty inside.
            I don't think it's touching but I'll have a look at it sometime today.
            sigpic
            51 Studebaker Commander Land Cruiser

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            • #7
              This type of frustration is usually caused by some little item that got missed. look carefully for bare spots on wires, loose screws/nuts, a wire that fell off without being noticed. It has happened to anyone who has done this many times.
              sigpic

              "In the heart of Arkansas."
              Searcy, Arkansas
              1952 Commander 2 door. Really fine 259.
              1952 2R pickup

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              • #8
                Did you leave it sit a while ? It looks like moisture could be a problem ? If you don't find an obvious problem, quick, use alcohol to dry out good and blow out. Replace condenser. They will saturate under certain conditions and cause you to go crazy.

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                • #9
                  When I worked at the GM dealership I had new in the sealed box points once in a while that didn't transfer current across the contacts. I just returned them to the parts guy and got another set. They must have had oil or a human touched the contacts at the factory.

                  From the looks of the rust on the top of the distributor shaft, I'd say someone didn't keep the felt oiled.

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                  • #10
                    I agree, check to see if the points arm is insulated from the fix contact.
                    Bez Auto Alchemy
                    573-318-8948
                    http://bezautoalchemy.com


                    "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by 52-fan View Post
                      This type of frustration is usually caused by some little item that got missed. look carefully for bare spots on wires, loose screws/nuts, a wire that fell off without being noticed. It has happened to anyone who has done this many times.
                      I noticed that the screw that held the condenser down, wasn't tight (even though I thought I did tightened it). I was like "Oh good! It should start now!" *try's it* Nope.. So I put the old points back in and still no start. So I walked away from it to cool down. I should have never messed with it.
                      sigpic
                      51 Studebaker Commander Land Cruiser

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                      • #12
                        One thing I used to do after installing a new set of points was to spread the contacts open enough to allow a match book cover to slide between them. Let the contacts close and pull the cover out, essentially wiping the contacts clean. You'd be surprised how often oil and dirt can get in there even after the best efforts to avoid it.
                        64 GT Hawk (K7)
                        1970 Avanti (R3)

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                        • #13
                          Does that engine have the carbon rod rotor? If it does, put an ohmmeter across it to check for continuity. I broke a brand new one when I dropped it. It looked right but it had no continuity.

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                          • #14
                            Actually i would take a multimeter and check for both continuity when you need it and resistance when you need that.

                            Essentially when the points are closed, you should have continuity from the + or - terminal of the coil to ground (with the Key OFF). Next you should have NO-Continuity with the points open.
                            Easy way to check for a grounded condition or open condition.

                            I've also had a new condensor fail out of the box.

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                            • #15
                              This will sound dumb, but I have seen it happen. Be sure you don't forget to turn on the ignition switch. With a stock starter switch, it is possible to get in a hurry and crank the engine without the ignition on.
                              Secondly, when the switch is on, check for power at the terminal on the outside of the distributor and then at the points. Make sure the power is actually getting where you want it. A meter is the best way to test, but a 6 volt test light will work.
                              Basically, work from the ignition switch outward until you locate the problem. I had to do this on the side of the road once and it got me going.
                              By the way. You were smart to walk away when you got frustrated. A bit of rest and some time thinking about the problem sometimes presents a solution....and can prevent broken things.
                              sigpic

                              "In the heart of Arkansas."
                              Searcy, Arkansas
                              1952 Commander 2 door. Really fine 259.
                              1952 2R pickup

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