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  • TWChamp
    replied
    Originally posted by Trikebldr View Post
    I decided to put 235/75-R15 on it. Comparing theoretical sizes, the 225 gives a 2mph less actual speed than the 7.60-15, and the 235 gives a 2mph greater actual speed. Since this car has the automatic, but no overdrive, I decided on the bigger tire. The two rears that were on it, and rotten, were 235s.
    Good choice, and I wish I had gone with the 235 instead of the 225.

    A windshield installer told me years ago that silicone against steel promotes rust, and if you notice all the rust around windshields where someone thought it was a good idea to seal the old windshield rubber with silicone, you will see what he said is true. Better to use the correct urethane to seal the glass.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mrs K Corbin
    replied
    yeah, your money is better spent on the restoration, as in 5 years time any new tire will be pretty much history. I generally get about 8 years out of mine, then have to toss them.

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  • Edsel G. Tattooer
    replied
    I would poder coat those rims and that should fix the pitting nicely.

    Leave a comment:


  • Trikebldr
    replied
    Originally posted by RadioRoy View Post
    What size are the new tires?
    I decided to put 235/75-R15 on it. Comparing theoretical sizes, the 225 gives a 2mph less actual speed than the 7.60-15, and the 235 gives a 2mph greater actual speed. Since this car has the automatic, but no overdrive, I decided on the bigger tire. The two rears that were on it, and rotten, were 235s.

    Leave a comment:


  • RadioRoy
    replied
    What size are the new tires?

    Leave a comment:


  • Trikebldr
    replied
    Originally posted by tsenecal View Post
    Yes, nothing like the look of new tires. When I was a kid, I drove around the local area in a 52 Ford pickup. I was in grade school,( 13 years old) and had zero money for tires, so I got very good at changing flats, and repairing them. At times, older gentlemen would give me the well worn take offs from their daily drivers, so I would have some "new" ones. Sorry for the rambling on. Just some thoughts from when I was younger. Happy to see your new ride rolling around.
    I love hearing the stories about how others spent their youth accumulating those experiences that teach us so much.

    Well, it's been a full 30 hours since mounting these tires on these wheels, and so far, no pound of pressure lost. They said that the stuff they use to lube the bead for mounting is also a sealer based on "Slime" and would help fil in those tiny pits in the rims. It starts out water-soluble, so it washed right off the outside after mounting. It was a white, foamy substance and did solidify before I got a chance to wash it off. A little Simple Green and a soft bristled brush took it right off the sidewalls. I'll recheck pressures in one week. I did do a soapy solution test as I was washing the wheels. No bubbles that I could see in five to ten seconds.

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  • thunderations
    replied
    They actually make a product for this that all tire mounting shops should have on hand or you can buy it at NAPA. It's name is: "Bead Sealer". Works better than silicone since it's made for the purpose. Silicone sealer often causes more problems than it cures. Age causes it to separate from surfaces instead of sticking to them. A second problem is then caused because nothing wants to stick to the area that the silicone touched.

    Originally posted by TWChamp View Post
    I've been using Vaseline on the beads and stem for a better seal. It sure helps, especially if you have an older rim with any rust pits.
    If the pits are more than very slight, then the silicone rubber sure would make a better seal.

    Leave a comment:


  • TWChamp
    replied
    Originally posted by jnormanh View Post
    A dab of black silicone rubber on the valve stem before you pull it in, and they'll not leak.
    I've been using Vaseline on the beads and stem for a better seal. It sure helps, especially if you have an older rim with any rust pits.
    If the pits are more than very slight, then the silicone rubber sure would make a better seal.

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  • jnormanh
    replied
    A dab of black silicone rubber on the valve stem before you pull it in, and they'll not leak.

    Leave a comment:


  • tsenecal
    replied
    Yes, nothing like the look of new tires. When I was a kid, I drove around the local area in a 52 Ford pickup. I was in grade school,( 13 years old) and had zero money for tires, so I got very good at changing flats, and repairing them. At times, older gentlemen would give me the well worn take offs from their daily drivers, so I would have some "new" ones. Sorry for the rambling on. Just some thoughts from when I was younger. Happy to see your new ride rolling around.

    Leave a comment:


  • Trikebldr
    replied
    Follow-up:
    Decided to just get some new, cheap tires on this car for now so I can roll it off my trailer and around for working on it. Until I find out how well it will run I didn't want to shell out a grand just in nicer tires. These are Provider Entrada tires Click image for larger version

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ID:	1728316and cost $63/each. Yeah, I had never heard of them, either, but they seem pretty nice, but then don't all tires when they are new? I do like the siping for rain displacement. If the car turns out to be a good runner, then I can invest more in some Toyos with wide whites.
    The dealer (Discount Tire) looked at my wheels and said no problem. Pretty much what Thunderations said! So, it now sits on four new tires and ready to be rolled off the trailer.

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  • TWChamp
    replied
    Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
    The correct way to install a Tubeless Tire, is to compress the center of the Tread with a Air Pressure powered expanding "Rope" used by professionals to expand the Bead.
    Yep, I have one and tried it, and tried the ratchet strap.
    I've never seen tires with the beads to tight to each other.
    I bought an air tank blaster off ebay, but it turned out to be a scam.
    I've used starting fluid in the past, and was ready to do it again, but opted for the inner tubes.

    Leave a comment:


  • 64V-K7
    replied
    Originally posted by Trikebldr View Post
    Some guys like the starter-fluid/Bic-lighter method, too! Always a good show,...….as a spectator way off to the side.

    A Harbor Freight tire rig and some lighter fluid are pretty effective

    Leave a comment:


  • Trikebldr
    replied
    Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
    The correct way to install a Tubeless Tire, is to compress the center of the Tread with a Air Pressure powered expanding "Rope" used by professionals to expand the Bead.
    Totally the professional way to go!

    Then there's the air-blaster method, if you have one available.

    Nowadays I just use a little $2 one inch wide ratchet strap. But, more often I pay the $7 that Discount Tires charges to mount or dismount a tire on a rim using their no-touch machines. Then, THEY use their little pneumatic strap, and it saves me scratching up my wheels.

    Some guys like the starter-fluid/Bic-lighter method, too! Always a good show,...….as a spectator way off to the side.

    Leave a comment:


  • StudeRich
    replied
    The correct way to install a Tubeless Tire, is to compress the center of the Tread with a Air Pressure powered expanding "Rope" used by professionals to expand the Bead.

    Leave a comment:

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