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Any NOS ones out there?

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  • Wheels: Any NOS ones out there?

    All five wheels on my '50 Commander had rust, so I had them sandblasted, and they are now painted with baked Rustoleum. They look good, EXCEPT,...…! There are some patches of rust pits that concern me. Not from a strength point of view, but from a slow leak possibility. Especially the ones surrounding the valve stem holes.
    On some wheels those holes are placed with enough "meat" be able to put screw-together type stems in them, and even be able to use some sealant around them, but these stock wheels have those holes right up against the perpendicular surface next to the hole. So, a standard pop-in stem will not be able to tighten up to seal into the small rust pits.
    Does anybody know of any original wheels available for this car. They would need the original hub cap retaining clip slots. That seems to be my stumbling block on finding replacements. Lots of suitable wheels otherwise.

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  • #2
    Well there IS hope, because these wheels should be quite available in good used condition SOMEWHERE due to the fact that they were used on a LOT newer, and Large number of extant 1/2 Ton Stude. Trucks.

    Not so much NOS ones though.
    The last NOS pair I bought was at Frost and French Studebaker in Los Angeles in 1970, and they may still be on the Champ I sold that now lives with Forum Member "Oregon Rose" in Oregon.
    Last edited by StudeRich; 06-05-2019, 10:41 AM.
    StudeRich
    Second Generation Stude Driver,
    Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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    • #3
      I don't think you will have a problem with the valve stem leaking. I've seen a lot worse rims with no air leaks. You could always put some bead sealer on the valve stem before installing for insurance.
      sigpic1966 Daytona (The First One)
      1950 Champion Convertible
      1950 Champion 4Dr
      1955 President 2 Dr Hardtop
      1957 Thunderbird

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      • #4
        When I installed new radials on my 1950 Land Cruiser, I couldn't get the beads to spread and take air, so I finally just installed radial tubes.
        Tubes hold air much better anyway.

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        • #5
          The correct way to install a Tubeless Tire, is to compress the center of the Tread with a Air Pressure powered expanding "Rope" used by professionals to expand the Bead.
          StudeRich
          Second Generation Stude Driver,
          Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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          • #6
            Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
            The correct way to install a Tubeless Tire, is to compress the center of the Tread with a Air Pressure powered expanding "Rope" used by professionals to expand the Bead.
            Totally the professional way to go!

            Then there's the air-blaster method, if you have one available.

            Nowadays I just use a little $2 one inch wide ratchet strap. But, more often I pay the $7 that Discount Tires charges to mount or dismount a tire on a rim using their no-touch machines. Then, THEY use their little pneumatic strap, and it saves me scratching up my wheels.

            Some guys like the starter-fluid/Bic-lighter method, too! Always a good show,...….as a spectator way off to the side.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Trikebldr View Post
              Some guys like the starter-fluid/Bic-lighter method, too! Always a good show,...….as a spectator way off to the side.

              A Harbor Freight tire rig and some lighter fluid are pretty effective
              64 GT Hawk (K7)
              1970 Avanti (R3)

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              • #8
                Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
                The correct way to install a Tubeless Tire, is to compress the center of the Tread with a Air Pressure powered expanding "Rope" used by professionals to expand the Bead.
                Yep, I have one and tried it, and tried the ratchet strap.
                I've never seen tires with the beads to tight to each other.
                I bought an air tank blaster off ebay, but it turned out to be a scam.
                I've used starting fluid in the past, and was ready to do it again, but opted for the inner tubes.

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                • #9
                  Follow-up:
                  Decided to just get some new, cheap tires on this car for now so I can roll it off my trailer and around for working on it. Until I find out how well it will run I didn't want to shell out a grand just in nicer tires. These are Provider Entrada tires Click image for larger version

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ID:	1728316and cost $63/each. Yeah, I had never heard of them, either, but they seem pretty nice, but then don't all tires when they are new? I do like the siping for rain displacement. If the car turns out to be a good runner, then I can invest more in some Toyos with wide whites.
                  The dealer (Discount Tire) looked at my wheels and said no problem. Pretty much what Thunderations said! So, it now sits on four new tires and ready to be rolled off the trailer.

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                  • #10
                    Yes, nothing like the look of new tires. When I was a kid, I drove around the local area in a 52 Ford pickup. I was in grade school,( 13 years old) and had zero money for tires, so I got very good at changing flats, and repairing them. At times, older gentlemen would give me the well worn take offs from their daily drivers, so I would have some "new" ones. Sorry for the rambling on. Just some thoughts from when I was younger. Happy to see your new ride rolling around.

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                    • #11
                      A dab of black silicone rubber on the valve stem before you pull it in, and they'll not leak.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by jnormanh View Post
                        A dab of black silicone rubber on the valve stem before you pull it in, and they'll not leak.
                        I've been using Vaseline on the beads and stem for a better seal. It sure helps, especially if you have an older rim with any rust pits.
                        If the pits are more than very slight, then the silicone rubber sure would make a better seal.

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                        • #13
                          They actually make a product for this that all tire mounting shops should have on hand or you can buy it at NAPA. It's name is: "Bead Sealer". Works better than silicone since it's made for the purpose. Silicone sealer often causes more problems than it cures. Age causes it to separate from surfaces instead of sticking to them. A second problem is then caused because nothing wants to stick to the area that the silicone touched.

                          Originally posted by TWChamp View Post
                          I've been using Vaseline on the beads and stem for a better seal. It sure helps, especially if you have an older rim with any rust pits.
                          If the pits are more than very slight, then the silicone rubber sure would make a better seal.
                          sigpic1966 Daytona (The First One)
                          1950 Champion Convertible
                          1950 Champion 4Dr
                          1955 President 2 Dr Hardtop
                          1957 Thunderbird

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by tsenecal View Post
                            Yes, nothing like the look of new tires. When I was a kid, I drove around the local area in a 52 Ford pickup. I was in grade school,( 13 years old) and had zero money for tires, so I got very good at changing flats, and repairing them. At times, older gentlemen would give me the well worn take offs from their daily drivers, so I would have some "new" ones. Sorry for the rambling on. Just some thoughts from when I was younger. Happy to see your new ride rolling around.
                            I love hearing the stories about how others spent their youth accumulating those experiences that teach us so much.

                            Well, it's been a full 30 hours since mounting these tires on these wheels, and so far, no pound of pressure lost. They said that the stuff they use to lube the bead for mounting is also a sealer based on "Slime" and would help fil in those tiny pits in the rims. It starts out water-soluble, so it washed right off the outside after mounting. It was a white, foamy substance and did solidify before I got a chance to wash it off. A little Simple Green and a soft bristled brush took it right off the sidewalls. I'll recheck pressures in one week. I did do a soapy solution test as I was washing the wheels. No bubbles that I could see in five to ten seconds.

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                            • #15
                              What size are the new tires?
                              RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

                              17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
                              10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
                              10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
                              4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
                              5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
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