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  • Clutch / Torque Converter: Clutch worn out ??

    How do you know if your clutch is worn needing replacement ? I have a diaphragm-type clutch ? The "action" on this is so fast , I can hardly keep from stalling out of 1st gear...

  • #2
    Originally posted by jackb View Post
    How do you know if your clutch is worn needing replacement ? I have a diaphragm-type clutch ? The "action" on this is so fast , I can hardly keep from stalling out of 1st gear...
    Fast action might mean to some the clutch is grabbing.

    Most CASOs drive 'em til the clutch slips under hard acceleration or chatters.

    The only way to know for certain is disassembly. The good news is a new clutch disc, pressure plate, throwout bearing and surfacing the flywheel is still not too expensive. Of course, it's a slippery slope, as the U-joints may need replacing, the transmission mount is probably soft and the transmission and shifter arm rubber bushings should be renewed while one is down there.

    BTW - what model is yours and who changed it to diaphragm pressure plate?

    jack vines
    PackardV8

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    • #3
      Originally posted by jackb View Post
      How do you know if your clutch is worn needing replacement ? I have a diaphragm-type clutch ? The "action" on this is so fast , I can hardly keep from stalling out of 1st gear...
      Fast action might mean to some the clutch is grabbing.

      Most CASOs drive 'em til the clutch slips under hard acceleration or chatters.

      The only way to know for certain is disassembly. The good news is a new clutch disc, pressure plate, throwout bearing and surfacing the flywheel is still not too expensive. Of course, it's a slippery slope, as the U-joints may need replacing, the transmission mount is probably soft and the transmission and shifter arm rubber bushings should be renewed while one is down there.

      jack vines
      PackardV8

      Comment


      • #4
        the truck is a 53' 2R6, the Commander 6. I see in the manual a diaphragm clutch for the R16 & 17, and the 3-fingered , I guess for the Champ ? I was surprised to see it when I installed the new tranny a few months ago.

        I just took the truck for a spin and if I feather pump the clutch (not double clutching), I can just get it moving in 1st gear. It did stall the first attempt. I've been driving this truck for 5 years now and am not new to standard shifting....

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        • #5
          It sounds like the clutch is grabbing, whereas a worn out clutch is more likely to slip.

          The one in my 50 Commander grabbed until I replaced the driven disk and clutch cover/pressure plate. I don't know if the driven disk was oil contaminated, or the pressure plate was not engaging properly or what. I was lucky enough to find an old stock rebuilt clutch set for it at a swap meet. This was years before eBay.
          RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

          17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
          10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
          10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
          4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
          5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
          56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
          60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

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          • #6
            I knew my clutch was "done with" when the car quit accelerating at 60 mph but the engine kept revving up.
            sigpic

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            • #7
              The actually improves as I drive, but a thought came to me that I might have a tired 65 year old return spring ? There is a short bit of grinding as the pedal is fully depressed. I'll have a look .....

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              • #8
                Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
                Fast action might mean to some the clutch is grabbing.

                Most CASOs drive 'em til the clutch slips under hard acceleration or chatters.

                The only way to know for certain is disassembly. The good news is a new clutch disc, pressure plate, throwout bearing and surfacing the flywheel is still not too expensive. Of course, it's a slippery slope, as the U-joints may need replacing, the transmission mount is probably soft and the transmission and shifter arm rubber bushings should be renewed while one is down there.

                BTW - what model is yours and who changed it to diaphragm pressure plate?

                jack vines
                Jack five years ago I put a complete clutch in my Avanti......with a favor from a trusted "wrench turner" out the door cost me $1,200.00 This included replacing the "ring gear" which somehow got chewed up by the Bendix....I watched him use a torch to remove the ring, and heat up the new one for installation...yes he could have turned the ring around to expose all good teeth, but I had already purchased an entire new ring, so I put it in.

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                • #9
                  just thought I'd bump this thread up to double down on now that my coil issues are resolved, I'm on to the clutch......I need to pick up an engine hoist Saturday for picking a 289 out of a Fairlane Ranchero, then its back in the garage to examine the clutch upon removal..... more later.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Hawklover View Post
                    Jack five years ago I put a complete clutch in my Avanti......with a favor from a trusted "wrench turner" out the door cost me $1,200.00 This included replacing the "ring gear" which somehow got chewed up by the Bendix....I watched him use a torch to remove the ring, and heat up the new one for installation...yes he could have turned the ring around to expose all good teeth, but I had already purchased an entire new ring, so I put it in.
                    I don't know about Studebakers, but the few ring gears I've replaced are "sided", that is, there's a chamfer on one side of the teeth. Turning one of those "over" might work, and might not.

                    Mostly ring gears aren't terribly expensive. And, as you noticed, replacing one is easy once the flywheel is off the car.

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                    • #11
                      And not mention the CASO fix? Mostly, six-cylinders engines come to a stop at one of three positions and eight-cylinders at one of four positions. Any good CASO will mark the worn positions on the flywheel and just flip over his ring gear and rotate it so when reinstalled, unworn positions are at the marks.

                      jack vines
                      Last edited by PackardV8; 06-06-2019, 08:31 PM.
                      PackardV8

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                      • #12
                        On a Flight-o-matic, the really CASO fix for a trashed ring gear is to remove the flex plate bolts, rotate the torque converter, and reinstall the bolts.
                        Now you have 3 or 4 new "stopping points", and did not even have to drop the transmission.

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                        • #13
                          seems to have morphed into a ring gear discussion at this point...I'll begin a new thread when things are opened up..........

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by skyway View Post
                            On a Flight-o-matic, the really CASO fix for a trashed ring gear is to remove the flex plate bolts, rotate the torque converter, and reinstall the bolts.
                            Now you have 3 or 4 new "stopping points", and did not even have to drop the transmission.
                            I've always thought (there I go, thinking again) the engine determined where the flywheel or flexplate stopped, not the transmission.
                            Jerry Forrester
                            Forrester's Chrome
                            Douglasville, Georgia

                            See all of Buttercup's pictures at https://imgur.com/a/tBjGzTk

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Jerry Forrester View Post
                              I've always thought (there I go, thinking again) the engine determined where the flywheel or flexplate stopped, not the transmission.
                              Agree, Jerry, but the torque converter outer housing, flexplate and ring gear bolt to the engine and not the transmission.

                              jack vines
                              PackardV8

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