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Hold down clamp and bolt

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  • Ignition: Hold down clamp and bolt

    I'm changing the bolt on the distributor to a socket head cap screw. Then use a ball end Allen wrench to get at it. This is coming from a retired
    Machine tool repair tech. Where everything is held together with socket head cap screws
    Best idea I had today
    Mark Riesch
    New Bern, NC

  • #2
    Good tip! I've been a machinist for 40 years and never thought of that. You must be smarter than me.

    JT

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    • #3
      Not to burst anyone's proverbial bubble, I did the same thing back in the 70's. Normal Allans, flat heads, button heads, all of'em.
      Nowadays, I'm using a bit of a mixture. I use studs with nuts as much as possible, then about a 50% mixture of standard cap screws (everyone calls.."bolts"), and Allan (proper name) screws.

      Mike

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      • #4
        Works fine until you Strip the inside of one.... BTDT. I think it might be ok on a Distributor, if you don't overtorque it.

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        • #5
          Socket head screw is a good idea and you very seldom strip the inside out if you use a quality wrench , Bondhus was our favorite at the plant , And I don't know if they still make them but they have wrenches specially made for distributor hold down bolts . I see them at swap meets , Ed

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          • #6
            See your friendly snap on man. He has them or at least did 2 years ago when I got mine.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by jts359 View Post
              Socket head screw is a good idea and you very seldom strip the inside out if you use a quality wrench , Bondhus was our favorite at the plant , And I don't know if they still make them but they have wrenches specially made for distributor hold down bolts . I see them at swap meets , Ed
              I have one in 1/2in. and one 9/16in.
              Oglesby,Il.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Mike Van Veghten View Post
                Not to burst anyone's proverbial bubble, I did the same thing back in the 70's. Normal Allans, flat heads, button heads, all of'em.
                Nowadays, I'm using a bit of a mixture. I use studs with nuts as much as possible, then about a 50% mixture of standard cap screws (everyone calls.."bolts"), and Allan (proper name) screws.

                Mike
                No bubble burst here, it just sounded like a good idea to share
                Mark Riesch
                New Bern, NC

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                • #9
                  Don't have a distributor wrench??

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                  • #10
                    And a distributor wrench will work on every Studebaker you have (plus other makes to with the same size head), where as you will need to change the bolt, using your distributor wrench, on every Studebaker you work on...... Correct tool easier.

                    Then there are crows foot sockets....
                    Frank DuVal

                    50 Commander 4 door

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                    • #11
                      The thing you have to be careful with using Allan tools is that there are metric and imperial, you can strip out a socket if using the wrong tool. As far as using the standard hex bolt there are distributor tools available at most tool stores that are standard 1/2 and 9/16 in one unit. They come apart for easy storage. Additionally once a distributor is set in place you should never have to move it for the rest of its life. Replacing points can be done in the car however it may be easier to remove the distributor. With all the cars I have owned I have never replaced the points, I have installed new points when the engine was out and disassembled, once installed I have never replaced a set, only minor adjustments.

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