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Too rich gas mixture?

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  • plee4139
    replied
    I've been informed by a carb specialist that a rebuild @ $315 is called for. Unfortunately, it's not in the budget right now and also it was adjusted, but not rebuit. when the engine was redone. it was rebuilt, however, when I got the car some eleven years ago. I don't want to drive it less as it's one of my favorite activities. Maybe I'll just sell the Sky Hawk and but a used motor boat. What could possibly go wrong with one of those?

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  • irish
    replied
    Originally posted by plee4139 View Post
    Fuel pump was replaced. I notice stains on the driver's side of the carb and paint is stained or melted away on the manifold. I tightened the screws and wiped it clean to see if those stains reappear. Could it just be a worn gasket? There is no ethanol-free gas here on long Island.
    Yes it could be as simple as a worn gasket. I had a 1962 Lark with a 4 barrel and the carb would have to be primed if it set for just a few days and it had a faint smell of raw gas when you opened the hood. New carb gaskets solved the problem.

    Hope this helps.
    Joe

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  • plee4139
    replied
    Fuel pump was replaced. I notice stains on the driver's side of the carb and paint is stained or melted away on the manifold. I tightened the screws and wiped it clean to see if those stains reappear. Could it just be a worn gasket? There is no ethanol-free gas here on long Island.

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  • Buzzard
    replied
    As Jeffry stated, using electric pumps can push the pressure way over ideal levels for our old style needle and seats. I use a cheap fuel regulator and dial them way back as our cars were intended to be used at very low (by today's' standards) settings.
    Luck,
    Bill

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  • Jeffry Cassel
    replied
    So far no one has mentioned fuel pressure and float adjustment. Lotsa people use electric fuel pumps and you need to be sure pressure does not go over 5 psi. If float is leaking or now adjusted correctly car can run terribly rich--if it runs at all. And gas can leak out between cover and body. Usually fixes are fairly simple (for others---not necessarily for me!)

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  • jclary
    replied
    Originally posted by plee4139 View Post
    I saw some gas stains on the side of the carb and wiped them clean and am keeping an eye one them. I also tightened some screws on the top. In the meantime I checked the tire pressures and they were very low, about twenty pounds! I refilled them all up to 35 (they're radials, of course) and i should see the mileage go back up to its normal 15mpg. These are easy fixes for people like me who love old cars but are strictly from the "Wash 'n Wax" school of maintenance.
    Nothing wrong with your "school of maintenance" 'Cept unless you become curious enough to obtain the manuals, study them, and get familiar with the information and mechanical procedures...you will be forever subject to the mercy of any mechanic who claims he knows what he's doing regardless of his actual skill and knowledge.

    Originally posted by PackardV8 View Post
    I turned screws on carburetors for fifty years before I got my first Air-Fuel ratio meter and a wide-band O2 sensor. Then, I learned how much I didn't know about what was going on in there...jack vines
    Jack, I hope I am not overstating your importance to the forum and the information you provide by putting you on a pedestal and giving you more credit than you deserve, but I do hold your postings in high regard. As far as I know, we have never met but my impression is that you have earned your living wrenching and in many ways that takes a special skill and knowledge base very similar to that of a surgeon to get it right. So for that, you have my respect.

    That said...I would like your opinion regarding the possibility of misadjusted valves on our engines??? So many of our "mechanics" today work on mostly hydraulic valve engines and are familiar with the quietness of their operation. I wonder how tempting it is to attempt to achieve the same quietness of hydraulic valved engines by "tweaking" the lifter adjusters "just a little more," and causing the symptoms Peter Lee is describing with his engine? It seems to me that a solid lifter type engine with the valves not closing long enough to burn clean will always emit a lingering fuel odor from poorly burned fuel dumped into the exhaust?

    Coming from me, it's like Gomer Pyle discussing physics...but I would like to know your experience regarding the possibility that this could be the issue with Peter's engine?

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  • plee4139
    replied
    I saw some gas stains on the side of the carb and wiped them clean and am keeping an eye one them. I also tightened some screws on the top. In the meantime I checked the tire pressures and they were very low, about twenty pounds! I refilled them all up to 35 (they're radials, of course) and i should see the mileage go back up to its normal 15mpg. These are easy fixes for people like me who love old cars but are strictly from the "Wash 'n Wax" school of maintenance.

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  • swvalcon
    replied
    Also keep in mind these old cars vented to tank to the outside air and if in a tight space you will sometimes notice a slight gas smell from that.

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  • Green 53
    replied
    Smell could be coming from leaking gasket at fuel sender.

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  • Dick Steinkamp
    replied
    Originally posted by 345 DeSoto View Post
    My money is on fuel boil off. Ethanol is the culprit. I run ethanol free gasoline and it has eliminated all sorts of fuel related problems...
    I run E10 in all my collector cars. All are carburetored No gas smell. I don't think ethanol is the culprit.

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  • 345 DeSoto
    replied
    My money is on fuel boil off. Ethanol is the culprit. I run ethanol free gasoline and it has eliminated all sorts of fuel related problems...

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  • abkco
    replied
    Could also be a leak in the fuel sending gasket. They don't last forever. Of course, that would only affect mileage through loss.

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  • PackardV8
    replied
    I turned screws on carburetors for fifty years before I got my first Air-Fuel ratio meter and a wide-band O2 sensor. Then, I learned how much I didn't know about what was going on in there.

    Setting idle A/F is easy. Setting cruise A/F ratio is easy. Wide Open Throttle A/F is easy. What is really difficult and expensive to get correct are the deceleration, all the transitions from idle to cruise, from cruise to WOT.

    Just getting all four butterflies to return to exactly the same position every time is difficult; the necessary spring is too strong for comfortable cruise foot pressure.

    jack vines

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  • Hallabutt
    replied
    Today's fuels just react differently then fuels of the past. If you take your car out for a run, bring it home, drive it into the garage and shut it down, you are as likely as not going to experience the smell of unburned fuel. This is because unlike the fuels of the past, today's fuels will tend to boil off quickly (evaporate) and leave a lingering smell in the air. It doesn't mean that your car is not running right, it's just a fact of life. In and of itself it doesn't mean that the car is't running right, but that doesn't preclude the possibility of other problems.

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  • Dick Steinkamp
    replied
    Originally posted by plee4139 View Post
    I'm afraid if i take it to my mechanic he'll make it too lean and it'll stumble and stall dangerously. Suggestions?
    There really is no way a mechanic can make it run leaner unless he changes jets...and that probably isn't going to happen. You can make the IDLE leaner with the air bleed screws, but that isn't going to affect fuel mileage or fuel smell. If it is running rich the choke is probably not adjusted correctly or is sticking, or the float level is too high. I agree that the fuel smell is likely a leak.

    Unfortunately it is getting tougher and tougher to find a mechanic that is competent with these older cars. If you can't (or don't want to) work on it yourself, it may not be the right hobby for you.

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