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  • Brakes: Brake booster vacuum hose

    First Studebaker with a power brake setup (1963). Wondering if anyone can tell me where the vacuum line hooks up to the engine? A picture would be helpful.

    Thanks

  • #2
    There's a pipe plug in the intake manifold runner right over/near Cylinder #5. This is the accepted port to tap manifold vacuum. Be sure you have a check valve on the line serving the booster.
    64 GT Hawk (K7)
    1970 Avanti (R3)

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    • #3
      Power Drum Brakes were available on Studebaker Cars since 1955 and Trucks much earlier.

      What you MAY have, is the First Front DISC BRAKE Power assisted equipped Year of U.S. Car, 1963.

      Yes, Intake Manifold.

      CAUTION! The proper Pedal Arm and Master Cyl. push Rod is also required for the changeover from non-power, if that is what you are doing.

      The 1959-64 Studebaker Chassis Parts Catalog will be a big help in sorting out the correct Parts.
      StudeRich
      Second Generation Stude Driver,
      Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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      • #4
        Originally posted by StudeRich View Post
        CAUTION! The proper Pedal Arm and Master Cyl. push Rod is also required for the changeover from non-power, if that is what you are doing.
        I would hope that you'd agree that the "correct" pedal and rod for a Hydrovac are great for authenticity but not worth a nickel if your booster fails. The standard pedal with a Hydrovac is the better means to assure some redundancy.
        64 GT Hawk (K7)
        1970 Avanti (R3)

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        • #5
          So you are trying to say that the taller pedal is better if and when the Power Boost fails in order to have more pedal travel for manual braking?

          That probably depends on whether we are talking about a Lark Type with Power Drum Brakes, a Lark Type with Power Disc brakes, a Hawk with Power Drum Brakes or a Hawk with Power Disc Brakes.

          I always figure that the Engineers at Bendix Brake, Wagner Lockheed, and Studebaker, knew a bit more than I or most of us here.
          StudeRich
          Second Generation Stude Driver,
          Proud '54 Starliner Owner

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          • #6
            In addition to the height of the pedal, there is different mechanical advantage, or leverage if you will, to each pedal assembly. If you combine a Hydra-vac with a standard pedal assembly, the brakes will be too touchy/sensitive.
            RadioRoy, specializing in AM/FM conversions with auxiliary inputs for iPod/satellite/CD player. In the old car radio business since 1985.

            17A-S2 - 50 Commander convertible
            10G-C1 - 51 Champion starlight coupe
            10G-Q4 - 51 Champion business coupe
            4H-K5 - 53 Commander starliner hardtop
            5H-D5 - 54 Commander Conestoga wagon
            56B-D4 - 56 Commander station wagon
            60V-L6 - 60 Lark convertible

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            • #7
              Disc brake 63 Wagonaire that had a modified Ford master cylinder on it when I purchased the car. We had a 64 four door that we unfortunately lost in a fire. The master cylinder, brake booster, and pedal assembly were all taken off that car and installed on my wagon.

              That car burnt when I was 8 so I did not remember where the vacuum line hook up was.

              Thanks for the help guys.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by RadioRoy View Post
                If you combine a Hydra-vac with a standard pedal assembly, the brakes will be too touchy/sensitive.
                Really think so? .... then you've never driven one with that configuration...
                64 GT Hawk (K7)
                1970 Avanti (R3)

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