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Low 289 Oil Pressure om '62 Hawk

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  • #16
    I didn't think about it before, but Jack is right. I've run into two engines that had the wrong size bearings installed causing low oil pressure and some engine noise. Fortunately on one engine the owner caught the problem before the engine was destroyed, but the other engine didn't fare so well as it was operated for several hours before the engine self destructed. I also had an engine come in that had a fresh rebuild, but still developed low oil pressure after running for a few miles. It turned out that the engine builder neglected to clean out the oil holes in the crankshaft and didn't do a good job of cleaning out the block before assembly and the rubbish pumped through the bearings destroyed the rod bearings and the crankshaft. Chet, you will probably find that who ever built the engine did a sloppy job which is now causing your problems. Bud

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    • #17
      As an added note I had to rebuild a 350 Chevy engine that was originally done by another rebuilder that didn't check that the cam was free in the cam bearings, used a mallet to drive in the cam pushing out one of the cam bearings which allowed the engine to run but with about 10 lbs of oil pressure when the engine warmed up. By the time I got the engine it was already trashed and needed another rebuild. Bud

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      • #18
        This reminds me of a neighbor's engine rebuild that I got involved in. He bought the car new and put well over 100K miles on it. He decided to rebuild it and freshen it up. He had a machine shop/engine rebuilder do the bearings and some other things. When the neighbor started the car and went down the street, he immediately turned around and came back. He came over and told me that there wasn't any oil pressure. He said that the machine shop told him that they mic'd. the journals, etc. He pulled the pan. I looked at the crank and saw that it was marked as a factory undersized as new in the car. With the proper bearings, the engine and car were good until the car rusted to the point of breaking in half. I figured that the machine shop just assumed that since the engine had never been apart that the mains were standard size. I guess that they didn't know about the undersized marking and didn't make the measurements that they said that they did.
        Gary L.
        Wappinger, NY

        SDC member since 1968
        Studebaker enthusiast much longer

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        • #19
          Thanks to all of you for the extra input. A couple of things that I didn't mention earlier, I verified my oil pressure with a second mechanical gauge, and the pressure relief valve was replaced with a new one. I'm anxious to get it out, and have a look inside. Hopefully the trash from the rocker shafts has not done damage. Another thing to note, is that it was broken in with amsoil 30w break in oil, then changed to amsoil 10w40 Z rod. Perhaps I should try some straight 30w, but with all clearances tight on a new rebuild, 10w40 should be adequate. Will let you all know what I find, and good luck, Chet with your engine project.

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          • #20
            Most informative posts, thanks to all. I will rebuild the engine and come back with a full report regarding what I find. Discouraging yes but is the process of learning to do things correctly. I have suspicion the rebuild by whoever did it was not careful.

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            • #21
              Jack Vines,

              Since this thread seems to be coming to an end, and since it still may have the attention of the expert here, I have a question regarding testing process that you noted. Is the procedure, that you indicated, applicable to an early straight eight?

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Hallabutt View Post
                Jack Vines,

                Since this thread seems to be coming to an end, and since it still may have the attention of the expert here, I have a question regarding testing process that you noted. Is the procedure, that you indicated, applicable to an early straight eight?
                Yes, in theory it is applicable to any engine having an oil pump and pressure oiling. Having never done the leakage test on an early straight eight, we need someone to verify there exists a threaded port available into the oiling passages for the pressure feed line to be connected. Oil pressure gauge, oil filter, even where the rifle drill bit making the passages entered the block, all are possibilities.

                jack vines
                PackardV8

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                • #23
                  chet445
                  I have had 2 Studebaker 289's that developed low oil pressure similar to yours. Both had been rebuilt with all bearings replaced. The first one started losing pressure after 2 years of driving. The second one after about a year.
                  On both engines the front cam bearing had worked its way out of the block. The first engine it was completely out and just riding on the camshaft. The second one the bearing had worked back just far enough to uncover the oil hole for the bearing. Just another possibility.
                  Steve
                  Studebaker driver since 1971
                  59 Lark
                  59 4X4
                  62 E45
                  64 E15
                  64 E35

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                  • #24
                    I was told by a friend who also had a low oil pressure condition in his 259. When he had the distributor rebuilt he forgot to install the round gasket between the block and distributor base. This caused the distributor shaft to push down on the oil pump gear and wear into the oil pump plate. Make sure that gasket is there.

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