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  • #16
    In my working career we used a lot of AN fittings. Of course they are a 37 degree fitting versus a 45 degree fitting that is common in the auto industry. Every test system I built I always used "flare savers" or as we called them,"nose seals" on the fittings. They were available in copper, stainless steel, nickle, and teflon coated stainless. As I recall, one company named Airdrome Parts supplied most of our nose seals.

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    • #17
      I replaced all the brake and fuel lines with Cunifer material in my Avanti.......beautiful to work with and zero problems!
      Originally posted by gordr View Post
      Jim, I believe the Cunifer line is as corrosion-resistant as stainless steel. Just not as pretty, but sure easy to work with. I won't use anything else, now, if I am doing an entire brake system. Might use the old plain steel line if simply replacing a single piece on a driver car.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Mark Plucenik View Post
        I do like and I am using Dot 5 fluid and I agree it is much more prone to leak. I have eliminated , I hope all the leaks. Backing off and retightening the fittings. I also always coat all the fittings and lines with brake fluid before I start to assemble. I guess I'm just crying now, figure at least 10 flares per car I've done lately at least 10 cars for free, friends and family, 100 flares, and not one leak! I do my own and have problems. Not fair.
        I did try to locate those Flare savers/gaskets. No luck, One hydraulic shop said they could order the 3/16 ", package of 100, for about $70. They never heard of them until I gave them the Parker part number.
        Can you please share the Parker Number for the 3/16 "Savers".
        Thanks
        John

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        • #19
          Here is one source:
          https://www.grainger.com/product/PAR...e-Gasket-5WRW0
          Bez Auto Alchemy
          573-318-8948
          http://bezautoalchemy.com


          "Don't believe every internet quote" Abe Lincoln

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          • #20
            Originally posted by doofus View Post
            Mike the key to a leak free double flare is to chamfer the end of the line real good before flaring. some times even that wont work,so just make up a new line or snip the flare off and try again.i just completed a re-plumb on a 60 lark, only leaker was the left front,the short one from junction block to brake hose. took 3 tries. still have line left.i really am out of practice!!! Luck Doofus PS used Ni Cop line, much easier to work with.
            Question: I'm just about to finally learn how to make my brake and fuel lines for my Hawk; (have the Cunifer tubing and fittings already). I've got the Mastercool (ie: really high quality) tool as a gift, and just purchased a RIGID tubing cutter, that said it came with a built in reamer. I was surprised the "reamer" is nothing more than a pocket-knife-like fold out triangle of steel, dull even, that only slightly reams the interior of your tubing cut. I can see where it is good enough to remove burrs, but with all the talk about chamgering the ends, I expected something more like the "battery-terminal cleaner" where you can clean up both inside and outside of the cut. Is the deburring of the RIGID tool going to be sufficient; should ideally leave a square cut with no burrs inside or out. Or do I need to "put some muscle" into the reamer and get a little angle/chamfer on the ID of the tube? Nothing I can do on the exterior except run a file lightly around it I suppose, but that would be "uneven", so a very gentle whisp around to remove a sharp edge only.... ?? Thanks!

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            • #21
              Like doofus said, I chamfer the OD with a fine file and use the reamer to clean the ID out. It will also help to use brake fluid as a lube when flaring.

              The best way to start is to just try several flares and get the feel for doing them. After a couple that look good you'll be an expert.

              Here's some illustrations on how I do mine.

              https://www.fordification.com/tech/doubleflare.htm

              Bob

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              • #22
                Home Depot offers an Imperial tubing reamer/de-burrring tool that will do a good job of prepping your tubing. It will handle tubing sizes from 3/16' up to 1-1/2". They list it at about $19.00.

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                • #23
                  Thanks Bob, printed it out as an extra reference. Always nice to read how to do something from different sources when you are doing it the first time (and with PHOTOS). And thanks Lark55; found it on Amazon and threw it in the cart; easier and more consistent (for a novice hand) than the file. I'm using DOT 5 silicone too, so anything I can do to improve my flares, the better. :-)

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                  • #24
                    the Parker number is 2GF-3, I just saw them on e bay, a pack of 10 for around $8.00. My local guy had to order them in packs of 100 for the 3/16".

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Mark Plucenik View Post
                      the Parker number is 2GF-3, I just saw them on e bay, a pack of 10 for around $8.00. My local guy had to order them in packs of 100 for the 3/16".
                      Those tiny things are pricey, I found prices from $0.44 to $1.53 each for them. Then you have to add shipping too. At the best price ten of them, with shipping, cost as much as 25 feet of 3/16" steel brake line tube and 15 fittings with shipping. You can make a lot of mistakes with the tube and still save money at that rate. Or just spend the seven extra bucks and get the cupro-nickel tube.
                      sigpic

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                      • #26
                        I found, thru my work experience, that using those seals on the fittings served two purposes. First off, the copper would deform of course to make a better seal but they also protected the sealing surface of the fitting if there were any defects in the flare. Most of the test systems that used AN fittings were required to have those seals installed.

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                        • #27
                          Sorry, I'm not reading all the advice you've gotten. I'll simply say this is WAY to important to mess-around with. Just do as was done originally... no substitutions, period. You do NOT wish to wreck with a flair just because your took a short-cut with a flare.

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